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Events
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • Exquisite Beauty is the first retrospective and publication to document the eye-dazzling ceramics created by Ralph Bacerra (1938–2008), a Los Angeles–based artist known for his innovative approach to surface embellishment. Curated by Jo Lauria, the exhibition features more than ninety of the artist’s finest pieces—dramatic, highly decorated vessels and sculptures that have never before been the focus of a major exhibition or publication.

  • Opening Reception for Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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Digital Media

Thesis Preparation

Students are given the time to work on their senior projects. Storytelling, storyboarding, and other issues are discussed in relationship to students’ personal or group projects. Critiques are a vital part of this process and assist the students in understanding their own creative processes, as well as those of others.

Perspectives in Entertainment & Technology

This course is a lecture series exploring all aspects of entertainment and technology development and its impact on the visual and visceral arts. Different sections are offered each semester, dealing with film, visual effects, type design, or other special topics.

Visual Effects I/II

Learn the methods for traditional visual effects. Morphing, resolution and resolution matching, working with layers, and wire removal are covered in the first semester. In the second semester, students use compositing techniques and effects to weave synthetic objects and characters into digital scenes.

 

Advanced Visual Effects

DGMD331    3 credits

This class will cover the 3D interface in Nuke, some effects animation, 3D Camera Projection in Maya, and the creation of Stereoscopy.

 

Advanced 3D Animation

Bringing a character to life implies more than simply making an object move. Expression, gesture, appearance, and reaction/response are all determined by personality and psychology. This course examines the traditional skills 2D animators have long used to create life-like characters, and reveals the computer-generated techniques that are available today.

3D Modeling and Animation

Having learned the basics, students now explore methods that give life to the models they create or adapt from the College’s extensive library. Animators and modelers learn about the uses and constraints applicable to 3D in films, television, and video games.

Media in Motion III/IV

The art and design of motion graphics is investigated in depth. Students explore the world of broadcast design, and the use of motion graphics for a variety of purposes.

Sophomore Studio Electives

 

Students select 2 units in the Fall Semester and 2 units in the Spring Semester.

 

Students may select from a wide range of studio elective courses listed below:

 

Drawing Fantastic: The Creative Figure

DGMD 230    2 credits

Los Angeles’ top models are presented in dynamic poses. The sessions are theme oriented with an emphasis on story and action

 

Drawing the Fantastic for Films and Video

DGMD231    2 credits

Concept Development & Creativity

Students learn to apply research, critical analysis, brainstorming and improvisational techniques in order to create ideas for effective storytelling and communication, through motion graphics and animation.

Type and Design Fundamentals

Students learn to use typography effectively as a design element and how to control the details of its use, both hallmarks of good designers. Design principles learned in the foundation year are reviewed as knowledge and experience in this area is extended.

This course may be susbstituted with Drawing the Fantastic for Films & TV (DGMD230)

Drawing the Fantastic for Films & TV

Los Angeles’ top models are presented in dynamic poses. The sessions are theme oriented with an emphasis on story and action.

This course may be substituted with Type and Design Fundamentals (DGMD340)

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