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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Judithe Hernandez

Norman ZammittNorman ZammittNorman Zammitt


As one of the pioneering artists in the vanguard of the Chicano Art and Los Angeles Mural Movement of the 1960's and 70's, ('74) Judithe Hernandez is regarded as one of the important visual artists of the period. During a time when Latinas were discouraged from seeking careers in the visual arts, she was one of a handful of women who shared equal footing with her male contemporaries and was the only female member of the seminal and influential artist collective "Los Four". The group also included the late well-known California painter, Carlos Almaraz, whom she met when they both attended graduate school at Otis Art Institute.

Her numerous works of public art and exhibitions have helped pave the way for the new generations of Latina artists that have followed. She has exhibited extensively in the United States, Europe, and Mexico, including the ground-breaking first exhibition of contemporary Chicano Art in Europe: Le démon des Anges. Her public works include the Los Angeles Bicentennial Mural (1981). Selected by competition from among the leading visual artists in Los Angeles, hers was the only mural commissioned by the Los Angeles Bicentennial Committee to officially commemorate the 200th anniversary of the city's founding in 1781. From its site within the El Pueblo State Historical Park on Spring Street, the 3-story mural, Recuredos de Ayer, Sueños de Mañana, overlooked the downtown area of Los Angeles for nearly 20 years. In contrast to her mural work, her studio work has always been pastel on paper. The lush color and haunting imagery of the work prompted one art critic to compare it to two legendary artists, saying it was a unique and beautiful "blend of Rivera and Rousseau".

Committed to the education of the next generation of Latinos, she spent 30 years teaching, lecturing, and in college administration at several major universities in California and Illinois, including: California State University of Long Beach where she was an Assistant Professor in the Chicano Studies Department; the University of California at Santa Barbara, Occidental College; the University of Illinois at Chicago; Triton College; Rush University; and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Born and raised in East Los Angeles, she now resides with her husband, graphic designer Morton Neikrug, and their daughter Ariel in Chicago. She maintains a studio and is currently working on a new series drawings and pastels for exhibition.