Otis College of Art and Design logo
Events
  • You are invited to a Movies that Matter Special Screening of the powerful new film shaping the debate about rape on college campuses, The Hunting Ground, on Tuesday, September 15 at 7:15 PM in the Otis Forum.  The Hunting Ground is a startling exposé of sexual assaults on U.S. colleges, institutional cover-ups and the brutal social toll on the victims and their families from the Academy Award-nominated filmmaking team of Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering.
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by 

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • Exquisite Beauty is the first retrospective and publication to document the eye-dazzling ceramics created by Ralph Bacerra (1938–2008), a Los Angeles–based artist known for his innovative approach to surface embellishment. Curated by Jo Lauria, the exhibition features more than ninety of the artist’s finest pieces—dramatic, highly decorated vessels and sculptures that have never before been the focus of a major exhibition or publication.

  • Opening Reception for Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty

  • Sunday, September 27, 2pm, Free
    Symposium: Centered on Clay

    Keynote speaker: Kathy Butterly
    East Los Angeles College | Rosco C Ingalls Auditorium | 1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez, Monterey Park, CA 91754 | 323.265.8650


    A symposium in conjunction with the exhibition Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty
    September 26 – December 6, 2015

O-Tube

Ysamur Flores-Pena: 2004-05 Faculty Development Grant Report


Report: Discovering the Dominican Republic

The Dominican republic occupies two thirds of the island of La Hispaniola. The other one third of the island is Haiti. This past Summer, thanks to the Otis College of Art and Design Faculty Improvement Grant, I traveled to the Dominican Republic to research issues of African folk religions and issues of identity. Haiti and the Dominican Republic have a history of political and cultural tensions dating back to the nineteenth century. After its emancipation from France, Haiti invaded the Dominican Republic and stayed from 1849 to 1850. This invasion not only brought two countries with two distinct colonial histories to a violent encounter it also allowed for the free exchange of traditions and folk practices.

Dominican folk religious practice or Dominican Vudu is a direct result of the geographical and historical closeness. The pantheon and the practices are very similar to Haitian Vodou yet Dominicans have also added their own flavor to the practice. In this context Haiti is both the invader, source of cheap labor, the boggy man, and sacred land at once.

The following images can provide a glimpse of this fascinating country.

 Columbus Lighthouse

The controversial Colombus Lighthouse built to celebrate the 500th. Anniversary of the encounter and to serve as a mausoleum for Colombus' remains.

 Painted column

Representations of Africa are always associated with music and magic.

 Folk dolls

Dominican folk dolls which use Africa as the source of artistic inspiration and national identity.

 Market

A thriving market that offer the practitioners the hosts of heaven for sale.

 Columbus Monument

The Colombus Monument celebrates the Hispaniola as "The land that Colombus loved the most."

 Taino folk carvings

Taíno (Arawak) inspired folk carvings.

 Meninas

The Meninas, folk carvings that reflects the Dominican concept of being the product of two cultures: Spanish and Arawak. (Africa is not mentioned.)

 Folk healer

The folk practices remain very visible with folk healers offering their services.