Events
  • In his lecture, Laurence Rickels reenters the exchange between Walter Benjamin and Alexander Mette, which led to Mette’s review of Ursprung des deutschen Trauerspiels in Imago and brought Benjamin to consider the clinical picture of schizophrenia, the topic of Mette’s dissertation-book, which he in turn reviewed.

  • Artist Anna Craycroft, of the current exhibition Tuning the Room in Ben Maltz Gallery, in discussion with artist and curator Micah Silver.

  • Emily Thorpe's art work addresses the twisting formation of memory through spatial relations and moments of domesticity. She will be presenting a solo exhibition for her Graduate Thesis at The Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art & Design, on view February 20 to February 25, 2017. There will be a closing reception on Saturday, February 25, 6-9pm.

  • Solmaz Sharif

    Mar 01| Lectures
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    Solmaz Sharif’s first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press and is a 2016 National Book Award finalist. Her poetry has appeared in the New Republic, Granta, Poetry, and other journals. Her first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press. A former Stegner Fellow, she is currently a lecturer at Stanford University and lives in the Bay Area.

  • Brendan Folwer was born 1978, Berkeley, California and lives and works in Los Angeles. His solo exhibitions include New Portraits (2017), Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, Portraits (2016), Mathew, New York and New Pictures, Six Sampler Works, and Benches (2015), Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles.

  • One of two "Show and Tell" hands-on book events held inside the exhibition Tuning the Room in the Ben Maltz Gallery, featuring selections from the highly regarded Millard Sheets Library Artists’ Books Collection.

     

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Ysamur Flores-Pena: 2004-05 Faculty Development Grant Report


Report: Discovering the Dominican Republic

The Dominican republic occupies two thirds of the island of La Hispaniola. The other one third of the island is Haiti. This past Summer, thanks to the Otis College of Art and Design Faculty Improvement Grant, I traveled to the Dominican Republic to research issues of African folk religions and issues of identity. Haiti and the Dominican Republic have a history of political and cultural tensions dating back to the nineteenth century. After its emancipation from France, Haiti invaded the Dominican Republic and stayed from 1849 to 1850. This invasion not only brought two countries with two distinct colonial histories to a violent encounter it also allowed for the free exchange of traditions and folk practices.

Dominican folk religious practice or Dominican Vudu is a direct result of the geographical and historical closeness. The pantheon and the practices are very similar to Haitian Vodou yet Dominicans have also added their own flavor to the practice. In this context Haiti is both the invader, source of cheap labor, the boggy man, and sacred land at once.

The following images can provide a glimpse of this fascinating country.

Flores-Pena: Columbus Lighthouse

The controversial Colombus Lighthouse built to celebrate the 500th. Anniversary of the encounter and to serve as a mausoleum for Colombus' remains.

Flores-Pena: Painted column

Representations of Africa are always associated with music and magic.

Flores-Pena: Folk dolls

Dominican folk dolls which use Africa as the source of artistic inspiration and national identity.

Flores-Pena: Market

A thriving market that offer the practitioners the hosts of heaven for sale.

Flores-Pena: Columbus Monument

The Colombus Monument celebrates the Hispaniola as "The land that Colombus loved the most."

Flores-Pena: Taino folk carvings

Taíno (Arawak) inspired folk carvings.

Flores-Pena: Meninas

The Meninas, folk carvings that reflects the Dominican concept of being the product of two cultures: Spanish and Arawak. (Africa is not mentioned.)

Flores-Pena: Folk healer

The folk practices remain very visible with folk healers offering their services.

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