Events
  • Shila Khatami

    Oct 04| Lectures
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    Though Shila Khatami’s paintings make use of pop cultural references—sometimes the titles quote Blondie or Cyndi Lauper lyrics—her works are ultimately about the tradition and material possibilities of painting. As the base for these works, Khatami uses readymade or manufactured objects found in common hardware stores, such as smooth sheets of aluminum, fiberboards, pegboards, and phonic isolation foam. Her painting process includes a wide range of non-traditional tools, like rubber bands and masking tape, and methods such as rolling, dripping, and scoring.

  • John Keene

    Oct 05| Lectures
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    John Keene is the author of the novels Annotations and Counternarratives, as well as several other works, including the poetry collection Seismosis, with artist Christopher Stackhouse, and a translation of Brazilian author Hilda Hilst's novel Letters from a Seducer. The recipient of a Whiting Award, Keene has been a member of the Dark Room Writers Collective and a Cave Canem fellow. He has served as the managing editor of Callaloo and taught at Northwestern. He currently teaches at Rutgers University-Newark and lives in New York.

  • Leonardo Bravo is an artist, curator, and educator and the Founder of Big City Forum. Big City Forum is an interdisciplinary project designed to explore the intersection between design-based creative disciplines (Design, Architecture, Urban Planning, etc) that take into account public space and the built environment. Big City Forum facilitates the exchange of ideas through gatherings, symposiums, exhibitions, and special events that promote forward-thinking projects and the individuals at the forefront of this vision.

  • Chris Coy

    Oct 11| Lectures
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    Chris Coy is an artist and filmmaker. His work has shown at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Sundance Film Festival, the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, the Netherlands Media Art Institute, and numerous international art festivals and exhibitions. He received his MFA from the University of Southern California in 2012. He is represented by Anat Ebgi, Los Angeles.

  • Professor Karen Tongson joined the USC faculty in English and Gender Studies in fall 2005. She received her Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Berkeley. Before coming to USC, Tongson held a University of California President's Postdoctoral Fellowship in Literature at UC San Diego, and a UC Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI) Residential Research Fellowship at UC Irvine.

  • Artist Polly Apfelbaum in conversation with David Pagel, within Apfelbaum's exhibition Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

     

  • Patrick Jackson studied at San Francisco Art Institute (BFA) and the University of Southern California (MFA). In May 2017, Patrick Jackson will have a solo exhibition at The Wattis Institute, San Francisco.

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Ysamur Flores-Pena: 2004-05 Faculty Development Grant Report


Report: Discovering the Dominican Republic

The Dominican republic occupies two thirds of the island of La Hispaniola. The other one third of the island is Haiti. This past Summer, thanks to the Otis College of Art and Design Faculty Improvement Grant, I traveled to the Dominican Republic to research issues of African folk religions and issues of identity. Haiti and the Dominican Republic have a history of political and cultural tensions dating back to the nineteenth century. After its emancipation from France, Haiti invaded the Dominican Republic and stayed from 1849 to 1850. This invasion not only brought two countries with two distinct colonial histories to a violent encounter it also allowed for the free exchange of traditions and folk practices.

Dominican folk religious practice or Dominican Vudu is a direct result of the geographical and historical closeness. The pantheon and the practices are very similar to Haitian Vodou yet Dominicans have also added their own flavor to the practice. In this context Haiti is both the invader, source of cheap labor, the boggy man, and sacred land at once.

The following images can provide a glimpse of this fascinating country.

Flores-Pena: Columbus Lighthouse

The controversial Colombus Lighthouse built to celebrate the 500th. Anniversary of the encounter and to serve as a mausoleum for Colombus' remains.

Flores-Pena: Painted column

Representations of Africa are always associated with music and magic.

Flores-Pena: Folk dolls

Dominican folk dolls which use Africa as the source of artistic inspiration and national identity.

Flores-Pena: Market

A thriving market that offer the practitioners the hosts of heaven for sale.

Flores-Pena: Columbus Monument

The Colombus Monument celebrates the Hispaniola as "The land that Colombus loved the most."

Flores-Pena: Taino folk carvings

Taíno (Arawak) inspired folk carvings.

Flores-Pena: Meninas

The Meninas, folk carvings that reflects the Dominican concept of being the product of two cultures: Spanish and Arawak. (Africa is not mentioned.)

Flores-Pena: Folk healer

The folk practices remain very visible with folk healers offering their services.

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