Events
  • Sitting in Sound

    Jul 15| Special Event
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    Image: Electronic Sound Bath
     

  • L: Nora Jane Slade, Kate Mouse Mickey Moss, 2014, Photo transfer and fabric paint on sweatshirt, cardboard and found objects. R: Marisa Takal, I Love My Sister, 2016, Oil on canvas, 65 x 50 inches.

    Opening Reception: I Wish I Was a Telephone: Nora Jane Slade and Marisa Takal

    Celebrate the opening of the two-person exhibition of work by Los Angeles-based artists Nora Jane Slade and Marisa Takal.

    Light snacks and refreshments.

    Exhibition on view July 15 - August 19, 2017.

  • Amelia Gray is the author of the short story collections AM/PM, Museum of the Weird, and Gutshot, as well as the novels Threats and, most recently, Isadora, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Tin House, and VICE. She is winner of the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, of FC2's Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. 

  • Image: BijaRi, On the rooftops of Santa Domingo-Savio neighborhood as part of the project Contando con Nosotros, 2011

    Opening Reception 3-5pm /  Curator and Artist led walk-thru of the exhibition, 3pm  /  Free

  • Talking to Action

    Sep 17| Exhibition
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    Image: Eduardo Molinari, Confluencia 2: Los Angeles River, 2016.

  • Luis J. Rodriguez was Los Angeles Poet Laureate from 2014-2016. The twenty-fifth edition of his first book, Poems Across the Pavement, won a 2015 Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement. He has written fourteen other books of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and nonfiction, including the best-selling memoir Always Running: La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A. Rodriguez is also founding editor of Tia Chucha Press and co-founder of Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural & Bookstore in the San Fernando Valley. In 2016 Tia Chucha Press produced the largest anthology of L.A.-area poets, Coiled Serpent: Poets Arising from the Cultural Quakes & Shifts of Los Angeles. Rodriguez’s last memoir It Calls You Back: An Odyssey Through Love, Addiction, Revolutions, and Healing was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award. His latest poetry collection Borrowed Bones appeared in 2016 from Curbstone Books/Northwestern University Press.

  • Raised in Philadelphia, with roots in South Africa and Trinidad, Zinzi Clemmons’ writing has appeared in Zoetrope: All-Story, Transition, The Paris Review Daily, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships and support from the MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the Kimbilio Center for African American Fiction. She is co-founder and former Publisher of Apogee Journal, and a Contributing Editor to LitHub. She teaches literature and creative writing at the Colburn Conservatory and Occidental College. Her debut novel, What We Lose, as well as a second title, are forthcoming from Viking.

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social practice

Public Lecture by Groupo Etcetera from Argentina

Special lecture by Groupo Etcetera from Argentina Galef Building RM 219


Directly following the lecture is Etcetera's FREE 4-day intensive workshop. Guests are invited to attend and encouraged to participate thoroughout the duration of the workshop.

This 4-day intensive, participatory engagement with GRUPO ETCETERA…(Federico Zukerfield and Loreto Garín Guzmán), NO WORK/NO SHOP, will be focused on research and experiment (through “trial and error”) to explore the diverse uses of artistic actions and social imagination strategies to solve common problems.

Making a Statement at Miami Art Week

Art Basel in Miami Beach, and the adjoining fairs, parties, and shows that converge in Miami, offers an annual sampling of contemporary art and culture. Acting as a barometer of the art world, attendees were able to view well-established and emerging artists alike.

Art, Aesthetics, and Activism Collide in the Work of Faculty Andrea Bowers

Andrea Bowers is a political artist who makes artwork that is just as compelling aesthetically as it is conceptually. She says her work is “service to the cause of activism,” but at the same time she looks for “an aesthetic within the subject” to communicate her political message.

Otis College of Art and Design Honors Socially-Engaged Artists; Rick Lowe and Masami Teraoka to Receive Honorary Degrees

LOS ANGELES, CA - Otis College of Art and Design will award honorary doctorates to Rick Lowe, visionary social-practice artist, and Otis alumnus Masami Teraoka (’68 MFA), internationally recognized artist and human rights advocate, at the 2016 Commencement ceremony May 15, 2016. 

ArtNet Features New Work from Faculty Andrea Bowers

When activism finds its way into the art gallery, the house style is what Paige Sarlin calls "new left-wing melancholy," or what I think of as “post-radical chic:" neutralized and neutralizing, mining the paraphernalia of protest for historical pathos. This is not the way Andrea Bowers operates, as you can confirm for yourself if you visit the LA artist's show at Andrew Kreps Gallery in Chelsea, dubbed “Whose Feminism Is It Anyway?"
 

Graduate Open Studios

2016 Graduate Open Studios

MFA Fine Arts
MFA Public Practice 

 

Visit studios and meet MFA students in Fine Arts and Public Practice.

Public Practice Chair Suzanne Lacy Demystifies Social Practice Art for New York Times

Carmen Papalia’s M.F.A. project doesn’t look much like art. For “Blind Field Shuttle,” he led his classmates across the Portland State campus in Oregon on an eyes-closed walking tour, single file, each with a hand on the shoulder of the person in front.

For the first half of the 40-minute walk, some nervous participants had panic attacks, or cried. Mr. Papalia talked about what they were passing — a fire hydrant, a brick wall, a fence — and the vulnerability they were feeling.

Public Practice Chair Suzanne Lacy's Performance on Gender-Based Violence Featured by Huffington Post

In Ecuador, roughly one in six women have experienced physical, sexual or psychological violence. To put it another way, 3 million Ecuadorians have counted themselves a victim of gender-based violence in their lifetime. According to the same Pan American Health Organization research, 38 percent of women in Ecuador have been physically abused, 26 percent sexually abused, and 17 percent have been victims of patrimonial violence. These statistics, however bleak, are still merely numbers. Numbers that look eerily similar to statistics across the globe.

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