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  • Jillian Mayer is an artist and filmmaker living in South Florida. Her video works and performances have been premiered at galleries and museums internationally such as MoMA, MoCA:NoMi, BAM, Bass Museum, the Contemporary Museum of Montreal with the Montreal Biennial (2014) and film festivals such as Sundance, SXSW, and the New York Film Festival. She was recently featured in Art Papers, ArtNews and Art Forum discussing identity, Internet and her artistic practices and influences.
  • York Chang (b. 1973, St. Louis, MO) is an interdisciplinary artist who uses forensic and archival information systems as supports for poetic gestures and alternate histories, in order to interrogate the aesthetic conventions of authority which often serve to blur the line between fiction and reality. He earned both his BFA (1996) and Juris Doctorate (2001) from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). York Chang lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, and is represented by Greene Exhibitions. 
     
  • Presidents' Day Holiday

    Feb 15| Academic Dates
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    Otis offices are closed for the Holiday.

  • Oliver Kellhammer is an independent artist, writer and researcher, who seeks, through his botanical interventions and social art practice, to demonstrate nature’s surprising ability to recover from damage. His recent work has focused on the psychosocial effects of climate change, cleaning up contaminated soils, reintroducing prehistoric trees to landscape damaged by industrial logging and cataloging the ecology of brownfield ecologies. He currently works as a lecturer in sustainable systems at Parsons in New York City.
     
  • Emily Kendal Frey is the author of the poetry collections The Grief Performance, selected for the Cleveland State Poetry Center's 2010 First Book Prize by Rae Armantrout, and Sorrow Arrow, as well as the the chapbooks Frances, The New Planet, and Airport. The winner of the Poetry Society of America's Norma Farber First Book Award, Frey's poetry has appeared in the journals Octopus and the Oregonian. She lives in Portland.

    Seating is limited.

    Maps & Parking Information

  • In this performance I try to summarize In search of past time with my own words, as a story of another time which reveals itself contemporary. I deliver my own intimate and personal perception of this book which radiates in my life. Each performance is another opportunity to explore different zones of the book, proceeding at random, inspired by an aleatory and fickle memory. 
     
  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture REDUX.4 by IÑAKI ÁBALOS

O-Tube

Graduate Fine Arts

Graduate Fine Arts Lecture: Whitney Bedford

Bedford received her MFA from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2003. She was the winner of the 2001 UCLA Hammer Museum Drawing Biennale and received a Fulbright Graduate Fellowship from Hochschule der Kuenste, Berlin in 1999. She has had solo exhibitions at Carrie Secrist Gallery, Chicago, IL; Cherrydelosreyes Gallery, Los Angeles; D’Amelio Terras Gallery, New York; Art Concept, Paris, and Starkwhite, Auckland, New Zealand.
 
Whitney Bedford is represented by Susanne Vielmetter and Weiss Berlin.
 

Catalogue: short films by Dana Berman Duff

Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

Alumnus Matt Carter Selected As an Artist to Watch

Alumnus and Graduate Fine Arts Dept. Asst. Matthew Carter ('10 MFA) has been selected by goop.com as a young artist to watch.

Carter's current solo show at Luis de Jesus in Culver City closes on October 17.

Graduate Fine Arts Lecture: Rebecca Morris

Rebecca Morris paints challenging large-scale abstractions. Known for writing “Abstraction never left, motherfuckers” in a 2004 painting manifesto when abstraction was out of favor in the art world, Morris has developed an unconventional, post-Bauhaus visual language that suggests new directions for abstract painting. Her canvases teem with unusual, seemingly disconnected shapes, each rendered in a different technique and floating freely through space. “I want my work to be a dynamic presence, to create visual and physical impact in a space,” Morris said in a 2012 interview.

Alumnus Jeffrey Vallance

Jeffrey Vallance ('81, MFA Fine Arts) 's work engages religious and secular aspects of pop culture in peculiar and particular ways. His process involves integrating and researching individuals and institutions ranging from the King of Tonga at the Royal Palace, to the Nixon Museum or Vatican officials. One of these video projects, Blinky, the Friendly Hen, was a collaboration with Otis classmates Bruce Yonemoto, Tom Recchion and Jim Rygiel.

Alumna Alison Saar

Interview on Youtube

Alison Saar ('81, MFA Fine Arts) was born in Los Angeles in 1956 to celebrated African American artist Betye Saar and painter-conservator Richard Saar.

She is a recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, an Artist Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, and a City of Los Angeles (C.O.L.A.) Artist Fellowship.

Alumnus Jim Rygiel

Three-time Oscar award winner Jim Rygiel ('81, MFA Fine Arts) supervised special effects on the Lord of the Rings trilogy. A Fine Arts major at Otis, Rygiel entered the world of special effects in the early 1980s, when computer animation for film was in its infancy. His first film, The Last Starfighter (1984), pioneered digital imaging in place of models.

Alumnus Lawrence Gipe

Lawrence Gipe ('86, MFA Fine Arts) paintings and drawings co-opt propaganda as expressed in advertisements, posters, "fine art" photographs, and tourist ephemera. These range from mid-1930s Nazi, WPA, and Stalinist "Five-Year Plan" imagery to recent-day military recruiting and corporate web-based "motivational" materials.

Alumnus Bruce Yonemoto

Media artist Bruce Yonemoto ('79, MFA) has collaborated with his brother Norman on film, video, and multimedia installations since 1978. The Yonemotos’ work is based on notions of difference and visibility, and much of their work appropriates commercial film and television imagery. Operating between the world of the art gallery and media clichés and myths of American culture, the Yonemotos exploit this relationship of art and commerce.

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