Events
  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 4:00 - 5:00 pm is Welcome to the Haunted Boulevard. Join DJ Platinum (Grace Potter) and DJ Batsy (Jessi Hita) for a journey of the folklores, urban legends, and paranormal encounters from different cultures. 

     

    Listen online at KLMU.

  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

  • Mexican artist Yoshua Okón’s videos blur the lines between documentary, reality, and fiction. He collaborates closely with his actors (often amateurs who are also the subjects of the work) to create sociological examinations that ask viewers to contemplate uncomfortable situations and circumstances.
  • Dana Johnson is the author of the short story collection In the Not Quite Dark. She is also the author of Break Any Woman Down, winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, and the novel Elsewhere, California.

  • Gallery 169 will be hosting the Otis College of Art and Design Communication Arts Graphic Design Junior Show, "5328," displaying a selection of work made over the five thousand twenty eight hours that make up the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Work will include collected posters, publications, and typographic projects.
  • Clay, Body is a solo exhibition from artist Sydney Aubert: Unapologetically fat, crass, and sexual, a ceramics artist who also works in video, and whatever other materials arouse her in the moment. Exhibition will be on view from Monday, April 24 - Friday, April 28 at the Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design. On view by appointment only, please contact the artist at sydney.aubert@gmail.com Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6pm-9pm Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design

  • Audrey Wollen is a feminist theorist and visual artist based in Los Angeles. Wollen uses social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, as platforms for her work on Sad Girl Theory, a theory which posits that internalized female sadness can be used as a radical and political action, separate from masculinized forms of protests such as anger and violence. She introduces this form of protest as an alternative to masculinized anger and violence.

O-Tube

ACTin Out

Aug 27, 2013
Albert Valdez (’10) Education Coordinator, LACMA
Spotlight Category: Alumni
by Albert Valdez (’10)

The Artists, Community, and Teaching (ACT) program was a valuable experience not only in terms of learning and developing the pedagogy associated with museum education but also in defining who I am as an artist. The program encourages the connection between an artist’s studio practice and the surrounding community, and putting into practice theories and principles of community arts education. As an ACT student, I participated in lesson planning, pedagogy theories, classroom observation, and hands-on teaching alongside my peers. The internship program placed us in a real world environment to work with professionals in a wide spectrum of educational programs. I was fortunate to intern with the LACMA Education Department, assisting museum educators in a gallery and studio environment.

No job was too small for a LACMA office/ teacher assistant—prepping, stapling, folding, filing, and listening led to a teaching position with the NexGen Program, which provides membership to children under the age of 18. NexGen members visit the museum for free, experience several art-making opportunities, and can invite an adult as their free guest. My NexGen experience led to teaching in the LACMA’s OnSite Library workshops, whichprovide intergenerational learning for all family members. These art education programs paved the way for me to lead my very own program—LACMA’s OnSite School Program.

The OnSite School Program introduces LAUSD students to the Museum’s encyclopedic collection. Each year, we partner with six elementary schools and two middle schools, visiting Special Ed and Pre-K-8 classrooms, where museum educators develop and lead one-hour art-making workshops. The Museum educators provide six art-making workshops per LAUSD classroom. LACMA’s mission is to support current arts programming in LAUSD schools by making personal and meaningful connections between LACMA’s encyclopedic collection and student learning, while building a strong presence in the community. With each visit, students focus on descriptive language to support their ideas and relate their art-making process to their own experience, knowledge and background. By reflecting and reinforcing their conversations about art with art making, students make a personal connection to the arts.

Along with participating in LACMA’s commitment to art education in the underserved areas of Los Angeles, I have worked with fellow alumni on the MobileMuralLab project, and with nonprofi ts such as the San Gabriel Conservation Corps. These groups educate the community on the importance of the arts as an integral part of everyone’s personal education. As an artist and community member, I intend to answer the call and do my best to make sure the arts stay in the minds of future generations.

Albert Valdez is the Education Coordinator for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) Education Department. He maintains a painting studio in Culver City and participates in the monthly art walks. Valdez is also actively engaged in raising community awareness of art through project-based workshops and mural programs.

“ I love that together we [LACMA & Otis] are fostering a new generation of artists who will include public engagement in their practice.”
—Karen Satzman, Director of Youth and Family Programs LACMA Education Department

Tags
Otis College Ranked 6th in Nation by The Economist