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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Academic Excellence:Miles Gracey

Most Influential Faculty Members?
You cannot run around Otis with scissors in your hands without accidentally bumping into a teacher that will change your life. They are abundant.


Cambria, California


Why Otis?
It’s really serendipitous. I originally attended Otis for its Graphic Design program.I had a few really influential teachers who led me to seek out something a bit more challenging; the rest is history.


Your thesis project?
I built a wall.


Interesting things that you did outside of school?
Outside of school?


Most influential class?
Any class that made me question everything I had already learned up to that point. Otis was a pattern of education followed by de-education, the exact antithesis of what came before. It’s an important value to have throughout life, learning to listen while simultaneously ignoring everything.


Favorite place in L.A.?
I seek out the places in which L.A. shows its seams: places where you get a sense that it is all just make-up on a desert: the back of the Hollywood sign, infamous sites where celebrities have died, the river. These are truly beautiful places.


Impact on your work/life?
I have realized that I am not me but rather a consequence of my last meal (which happened to be a Big Mac and fries). I go through life consuming the world around me. At some point I must have ingested someone with dark brown hair,
possibly tall, but not too. So exactly who was I before I ate myself? Was I horny? And moreover, how piquant would he or she have been fricasseed?


What’s next?
Anything and everything. I think that is the real beauty of an art education, because you are never acutely trained to do one thing. There will never be precisely one thing to do. It is never a good career move to go to art school, but it can allow you to never really have a career. I hope never to work a single day as an artist. I think that is where the true cultural significance of the artist emanates from.


Something unusual/idiosyncratic?
I eat people. I am a cannibal.


Information/tips for future students?
Don’t worry, about a thing, ’cause every little thing, is going to be all right...