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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Otis College of Art and Design to Mount Exhibition Doin’ It In Public: Feminism and Art at the Woman’s Building

Please contact Margaret Reeve (310) 665 6957 for inquiries.

Retrospective on the Pioneering Work of Feminist Artists, Art Cooperatives at Los Angeles Woman’s Building to Open October 2011

Exhibition and Catalog Part of The Getty Foundation’s Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980

LOS ANGELES – March 9, 2010 – Otis College of Art and Design, with financial support from The Getty Foundation, is in the final stages of organizing the much-anticipated exhibition, Doin’ It In Public: Feminism and Art at the Woman’s Building, to be held Oct. 1–Dec. 3, 2011 at Ben Maltz Gallery. The gallery show, catalog and supporting public events will document, contextualize and pay tribute to the groundbreaking work of feminist artists and art cooperatives that were centered in and around the Los Angeles Woman’s Building in the 1970s and 1980s. Doin’ It In Public: Feminism and Art at the Woman’s Building is part of The Getty Foundation’s larger initiative Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980 which, through an unprecedented series of concurrent exhibitions throughout Southern California, highlights the significance of art in Los Angeles in the post-World War II decades. The Getty Foundation awarded Otis College of Art and Design two grants totaling $225,000 for this exhibition and a scholarly catalog on the art and artists of the Woman’s Building circa 1975.

Project directors for the Doin’ It in Public exhibition are Meg Linton, director of Galleries and Exhibitions at Otis College, and artist Sue Maberry, director of Library and Instructional Technology at Otis College. Maberry was also program director at the Woman’s Building from 1979-1988. “The feminist art movement of the 1970s set off an explosion of art making and analysis that still reverberates in the art world today, and the Woman's Building in Los Angeles was one of the major centers of activity,” says Maberry. Founded in 1973 by artist Judy Chicago, graphic designer Sheila Levrant de Bretteville, and art historian Arlene Raven, the Woman’s Building pioneered new models of feminist education, advanced new processes for building community, and posited a feminist art that “raises consciousness, invites dialogue, and transforms culture.” From 1973 to 1991 the Woman’s Building housed and supported the creation of highly original works in performance, graphics, literature, video and visual arts, and presented some of the leading women artists of the time, including muralist Judy Baca, artist Betye Saar, performance artist Suzanne Lacy, comedian and actor Lily Tomlin, and authors Kate Millett and Alice Walker, among others.

A prestigious team of scholars has been assembled to contribute essays to the Doin’ It in Public exhibition catalog and provide curatorial advice. The project scholars are Vivien Fryd, professor of art history, Vanderbilt University; Alexandra Juhasz, professor in media studies, Claremont Graduate University; Jennie Klein, assistant professor of art history, Ohio University; Michelle Moravec, assistant professor of history, Rosemont College; Jennifer Sorkin, curatorial associate, Yale Center for British Art, Yale University. One major component of Doin’ It in Public: Feminism and Art at the Woman’s Building will be the focus on the importance of collaborative work that was developed, taught and executed at the Woman’s Building. Collaborative groups and art collaborations are difficult to present and are often neglected in exhibition because they can be too complex - an issue the Woman’s Building exhibition will address.

“The artists, artifacts, and art selected for this project reinforce the profound impact the Woman’s Building had on the feminist art movement,” says Linton, “and will create a strong visual and educational experience for the show’s visitors.” According to the organizers, the goal of Doin’ It In Public is to enhance the audience’s experience by enabling each viewer to fully comprehend the significant impact the Woman’s Building had on the Los Angeles art community, and also how it relates to other Pacific Standard Time exhibitions of the same timeframe.

“Otis College is particularly pleased to present this retrospective on the Woman’s Building,” says Otis President Samuel Hoi, “because Otis has a strong connection to so many of the women artists who established this seminal art center in the 1970s.” Suzanne Lacy is the current chair of Graduate Public Practice at Otis College of Art and Design; Sheila Levrant de Bretteville founded the graphic design program at Otis in 1981; Cynthia Marsh served as the Chair of Communication Arts at Otis from 1992 to 1995; artist Betye Saar taught at Otis in the early 1980s, and was awarded an honorary doctorate in 1992.

See videos and more through the Ben Maltz Gallery site.



Media inquiries, please contact Sheri Mobley



Established in 1918, Otis College of Art and Design is a national leader in art and design education. The College mission is to prepare diverse students of art and design to enrich our world through their creativity, skill, and vision. Alumni and faculty are Fulbright, MacArthur, and Guggenheim grant recipients, Oscar awardees, legendary costume designers, leaders of contemporary art movements, and design stars at Apple, Abercrombie & Fitch, Adobe, Pixar, DreamWorks, Mattel, Nike, and Disney.

Otis enrolls approximately 1,100 full-time students, and offers Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in Architecture/Landscape/Interiors, Digital Media (Game and Entertainment Design, Animation, and Motion Design), Fashion Design, Communication Arts (Graphic Design, Illustration, and Advertising Design), Fine Arts (Painting, Photography, and Sculpture/New Genres), Product Design, and Toy Design.  Otis also awards the Master of Fine Arts degree in Fine Arts, Graphic Design, Public Practice, and Writing.

The five-acre main campus is located on L.A.’s Westside near the beach and LAX; the Graduate Studios are in nearby Culver City, and in the 18th Street Arts Center in Santa Monica.

2,700 adults and children participate in Continuing Education art and design classes and workshops.