Events
  • Sitting in Sound

    Jul 15| Special Event
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    Image: Electronic Sound Bath
     

  • Opening Reception

    Jul 15| Special Event
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    L: Nora Slade, Kate Mouse Mickey Moss, 2014, Photo transfer and fabric paint on sweatshirt, cardboard and found objects. R: Marisa Takal, I Love My Sister, 2016, Oil on canvas, 65 x 50 inches.

    Opening Reception for the two-person exhibition of work by the Los Angeles-based artists Nora Slade and Marisa Takal

    Light snacks and refreshments.

    Exhibition on view July 15 - August 19, 2017.

    Bolsky Gallery located across from Ben Maltz Gallery, ground floor, Galef Center for Fine Arts.

  • Amelia Gray is the author of the short story collections AM/PM, Museum of the Weird, and Gutshot, as well as the novels Threats and, most recently, Isadora, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Tin House, and VICE. She is winner of the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, of FC2's Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. 

  • Image: BijaRi, On the rooftops of Santa Domingo-Savio neighborhood as part of the project Contando con Nosotros, 2011

  • Talking to Action

    Sep 17| Exhibition
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    Image: Eduardo Molinari, Confluencia 2: Los Angeles River, 2016.

    Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas is an exhibition and bilingual publication that investigates contemporary, community-based social art practices in the Americas. Talking to Action is part of the Getty’s initiative Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles.
     

  • Luis J. Rodriguez was Los Angeles Poet Laureate from 2014-2016. The twenty-fifth edition of his first book, Poems Across the Pavement, won a 2015 Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement. He has written fourteen other books of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and nonfiction, including the best-selling memoir Always Running: La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A. Rodriguez is also founding editor of Tia Chucha Press and co-founder of Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural & Bookstore in the San Fernando Valley. In 2016 Tia Chucha Press produced the largest anthology of L.A.-area poets, Coiled Serpent: Poets Arising from the Cultural Quakes & Shifts of Los Angeles. Rodriguez’s last memoir It Calls You Back: An Odyssey Through Love, Addiction, Revolutions, and Healing was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award. His latest poetry collection Borrowed Bones appeared in 2016 from Curbstone Books/Northwestern University Press.

  • Raised in Philadelphia, with roots in South Africa and Trinidad, Zinzi Clemmons’ writing has appeared in Zoetrope: All-Story, Transition, The Paris Review Daily, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships and support from the MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the Kimbilio Center for African American Fiction. She is co-founder and former Publisher of Apogee Journal, and a Contributing Editor to LitHub. She teaches literature and creative writing at the Colburn Conservatory and Occidental College. Her debut novel, What We Lose, as well as a second title, are forthcoming from Viking.

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Ombudsperson

The Faculty Ombudsperson is available to talk informally and confidentially with any Otis faculty member—parttime, adjunct, or full-time—about any Otis workplace issue, concern, problem or dispute. Talking with the Faculty Ombudsperson may be a first step, a middle step, or even a last resort. The Ombudsperson will listen to you, discuss your concerns, and explain policies and options. As a neutral party and without talking sides, the Ombudsperson will help you develop strategies for solving problems and confiicts.
The Faculty Ombudsperson is not a decision maker and does not have the power to establish, change, or set aside College rules or policies. The Ombudsperson does track trends and challenges, and makes recommendations to the College concerning improvements in policies or practices.


What the Faculty Ombudsperson Does:

• Does: Listen to you, which may be all you want
• Does: Act as a sounding board for your concerns
• Does: Explain institutional procedures and policies and how
they affect you
• Does: Help you develop strategies and resources for solving
problems or confiicts
• Does: Facilitate conversations when appropriate, freeing you to
focus on your concerns

 

When You Should Contact the Faculty Ombudsperson:

• When you need to talk through a challenging workplace situation
• When you are not sure which policy or procedure applies
in your circumstance
• When you feel that you have been treated unfairly by anyone
in the College
• When you are not sure whether your concerns are appropriate (just ask)

 

What the Faculty Ombudsperson Does Not Do:

• Does Not: Make decisions for anyone
• Does Not: Offer psychological counseling
• Does Not: Serve as an advocate for anyone
• Does Not: Testify in formal or legal actions or offer legal advice
• Does Not: Keep records concerning you or your specific concerns
• Does Not: Act as an agent or office of notice to the College

 

Meetings With the Faculty Ombudsperson Are:

• Confidential: The Faculty Ombudsperson will not identify you or discuss your concerns with anyone without your permission. All communications with the Ombudsperson are privileged and others cannot waive this privilege. The only exceptions are when such disclosure is necessary given an imminent risk of serious harm, or if required by law.
• Neutral: The Faculty Ombudsperson advocates not for any individual, but for fairness, equity, and the mission of the College.
Informal: All meetings with the Faculty Ombudsperson are voluntary. They are also separate and apart from the formal processes of the College. The Ombudsperson does not make decisions on behalf of the College. Speaking to the Ombudsperson does not constitute legal notice to the College that a problem exists. The Ombudsperson will not participate as a witness nor agree to be subpoenaed in any formal institutional or legal proceeding. The Ombudsperson does not keep any records.
• Independent: The Faculty Ombudsperson is not part of the Administration of the College, nor responsible to any department in his role as Ombudsperson. The Ombudsperson reports solely and directly to the Provost. These reports are statistical in nature. The Ombudsperson subscribes to the Code of Ethics and the Standards of Practice of the International Ombudsman Association.


Contacting the Faculty Ombudsperson:

LAS Faculty; David Bremer

The Faculty Ombudsperson is David Bremer. He can be reached at 310-665-6861

A graduate of the Harvard Divinity School and Wittenberg University, David has worked with Otis for sixteen years in a variety of both classroom and project situations. He was a founding member of the Otis Academic Assembly, and directed the Otis FIPSE project for faculty development.

In addition to serving as Faculty Ombudsperson, David is an Associate Professor in the Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

The Faculty Ombudsperson will arrange a confidential meeting at a time and place convenient for you. The Ombudsperson believes that it is most effective to meet with you, but will also work with you over the telephone. The Ombudsperson does not work through e-mail, although he can be contacted at ombuds@otis.edu. You are reminded that e-mail is not a secure communication and are discouraged from sending any confidential information through e-mail.

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