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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Benefits and Uses

Benefits to Students:

  • Assists learners in making connections among learning experiences (formal and informal learning, academic, co-curricular and extra-curricular learning).
  • Promotes development of reflective learning - “Reflection … challenges students to use critical thinking to examine presented information, question its validity, and draw conclusions based on the resulting ideas” (Intime: Integrating New Technologies Into the Methods of Education). This type of learning is developmental, self-directive, and lifelong.
  • Provides a history of development and growth to assist in planning future learning needs based on previous successes and failures.
  • Further addresses Information Literacy through protocols for obtaining permissions and documenting Internet sources.
  • Helps students gain knowledge about how they represent themselves on the web  through purposeful collection and presentation of information that conveys a web-savvy, deliberately constructed virtual identity.
  • Personal control of learning history (as compared to organizations controlling learner history) and manage various levels of access to their portfolios.
  • Expand students’ understanding of visual rhetoric.

Benefits to Faculty:

  • Encourages students to link artifacts to learning outcomes.
  • Allows faculty to better sequence and scaffold learning outcomes at different developmental stages.
  • Supports transferability of common learning outcomes by linking artifacts to other courses.
  • Can use Learning Portfolio assessment to improve teaching strategies.
  • Provides a vehicle for more authentic assessment over time as creates an assessment-trail that is centralized and under learner control.
  • Means to share content with other faculty.
  • Prepare student learners for life-long learning.

Benefits to Otis Community:

  • Provides a system to demonstrate college-wide learning outcomes.
  • Encourages collaboration among departments to articulate common learning outcomes and shared assessment goals.
  • Provides a way to synthesize the students’ academic experiences, strengthen curricular coherence, and provide a potential venue for the growing prominence of extra-curricular experiences.
  • Demonstrates applications and critical literacies for course or programmatic assessment.
  • Contributes to idea of education as lifelong learning - students are able to adapt their Learning Portfolios to various purposes and uses beyond their academic careers (with the potential of ongoing alumni relationships and longitudinal tracking).