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  • Silke Otto-Knapp is a painter and associate professor of painting and drawing at UCLA. 
     
    She has had recent one-person exhibitions at Overduin and Kite, Los Angeles; Galerie Buchholz, Berlin; the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive; Greengrassi, London; Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London; Kunstverein Munich, Germany; Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, New York; the Banff Centre, Canada; Modern Art Oxford, UK; and Tate Britain, London.
     
  • Sergej Jensen

    Mar 31| Lectures
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    Sergej Jensen’s work draws on a wide range of materials and formal references. Primarily known for his textile works, his lyrical compositions incorporate a variety of fabrics, from burlap and linen to silk and wool.
     
    He recently exhibited his work in the show "Classic" at Regen Projects, and his work is also included in LACMA's show "Variations: Conversations in and around Abstract Painting.”
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  • Otis College of Art and Design Fine Arts Department presents the film collaborative from Berlin OJOBOCA.

     

    Thursday April 2nd, 2015
    7pm in Ahmanson Hall, lower-level screening room.
    9045 Lincoln Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90045

     

  • Chen Tamir is a distinguished Israeli curator and art writer based in Tel Aviv, where she works at the Center for Contemporary Art. She was listed by Artslant as one of 15 curators to watch in 2015. Until recently she was based in New York working as an independent curator and also as Executive Director of Flux Factory, a non-profit arts center in Queens, NY, where she founded an acclaimed residency program and set up a thriving institution. Chen holds an M.A. from Bard College's Center for Curatorial Studies, a B.A. in Anthropology, and a B.F.A. in Visual Art from York University.

  • Rea Tajiri

    Apr 07| Lectures
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    Rea Tajiri is a New York based filmmaker and educator who has written and directed an eclectic body of dramatic, experimental, and documentary films currently in commercial and educational distribution. She is also an Associate Professor at Temple University in the Film Media Arts Department.
     
    Learn more about the artist here.
     
  • Dusk to Dusk

    Apr 11| Exhibition
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    James Aldridge, The Gathering, 2010, Acrylic on canvas


    Dusk to Dusk: Unsettled, Unraveled, Unreal

    April 11 - July 26, 2015  |  Gallery Hours: Tue-Fri 10-5 / Thu 10-7 / Sat-Sun 12-4

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Whitney BIennial includes Otis alumnus and faculty member

John Mason, Joel Otterson

The Whitney Museum's Biennial opens Friday, March 7, and includes work by alumnus John Mason ('57) and faculty member Joel Otterson. Both artists blur the difference between art and craft.

Mason's abstract clay sculptures completed over the last six decades have contributed to changing the medium. From 1957-1965, Mason focused on exploring the physical properties of clay—its possibilities as well as its limitations, constantly experimenting with plasticity, pushing clay to its technical limits, and developing innovative firing techniques. His tall vertical sculptures, huge wall reliefs, cross forms and geometric shapes explore symmetry, rotation, mass, and the integration of color and form. His interest in primitive art is manifested in the mysterious and totemic quality of many of his works. L.A. art critic Suzanne Muchnic, writing for ArtNews, describes his position: “A major figure in ceramic sculpture, Mason emerged in the mid-1950s as one of the leaders of a revolution that transformed clay from a craft to a fine art medium … In his latest work, Mason has proved himself a master builder and sculptor who knows how to get the most out of a relatively simple three-dimensional form.”  As John Coplans writes, “he is not only capable of endowing his massive images with a rich complexity of associative values, but in helping to free ceramics from its long tradition of vessel form and intimate scale he has persuasively demonstrated the flexibility of a hitherto limited material.”

 

Joel Otterson scours swap meets for found objects that become part of his assemblages. For the past 30 years, he has made sculpture that combines aspects of domestic handicraft with traditional sculptural materials such as copper pipe, woodworking, pottery, porcelain, china, earthenware, concrete, marble, and stained glass. Using quilting, lacemaking, and sewing, traditionally associated with feminine crafts, Joel turns these humble materials into muscular art. He was one of the youngest artists ever selected for a one-person exhibition in the Projects Room of the Museum of Modern Art, N.Y. (1987), and has been included in both the 1993 Venice Biennale, and "Made in L.A," the first California biennial held at the Hammer Museum, L.A. "Brancusi would be one of my favorite artists and influences. I make everything myself. I also love decorative arts, furniture, dinnerware, and architecture, because it’s all about living. My influences are eclectic, and for me it speaks about our “postmodern” world and especially about being American. I am very interested in how an inanimate object can trigger an emotion."