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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Made in LA features faculty, alumni

Hammer Museum exhibition

The Hammer Museum's biennial Made in LA, through Sept 7, features work by alumni Tony Greene '85, Kim Fisher MFA '98, Juan Capistran '99, and Mike Frimkess MFA '57. The curators selected 35 artists, with an emphasis on those who are emerging and under recognized. The exhibition debuts recent work and new painting, installation, video, sculpture, photography, and performances created specifically for the exhibition.

One of the under recognized artists in the exhibition is alumnus Tony Greene (‘85), who died of AIDS in 1990. His paintings have not been exhibited or recognized since 1995. One room at the Hammer contains the exhibition Amid Voluptuous Calm, which excavates Greene’s oeuvre, placing it in dialogue with other queer artists in Los Angeles whose work similarly tackles issues of desire, mortality, and trauma. Among those artists is faculty member Judie Bamber.  This “show-within-a-show” hints at the numerous ways visual art, poetry, activism, performance, and S&M converge, and how notions of queerness inform artistic production.

Alumnus Michael Frimkess (’57) and his wife Magdalena Suarez Frimkess have been making ceramic work since Michael graduated from Otis, continuing the tradition that Peter Voulkos began in the 1950s. They collaborate on work that comments on contemporary life with imagery from comic books, scenes from South American villages, and Picasso masterpieces. YouTube Video

Also included in Made in LA are site-specific pieces by Juan Capistran ’99 and Kim Fisher MFA ’98.

Faculty member Lauren Mackler shows work from her enterprise Public Fiction, characterized by the LA TImes as "a social hub and a destination for creative experimentation for dozens of emerging and well-known artists."

"It's something you see internationally," curator Connie Butler says. "But we felt that right here, right now, there's a certain vitality around these groups in L.A." Mackler chooses a topic for each show, then invites artists to create work — visual artworks, lectures, performances, screenings, musical acts, fiction, anything goes — around that idea. Each exhibition's three-month run culminates in a printed journal Mackler creates, featuring new works inspired by the show.