Events
  • Intern Recruitment Day

    Mar 30| Special Event
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    Continental breakfast will be from 8:00 – 8:45, interviews will take place from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm. Otis welcomes companies that are recruiting for Summer internships in the following areas: Architecture/Landscape/Interiors, Digital Media, Communications Arts, Fashion Design, Fine Arts, Product Design, Toy Design.
  • A quintessentially Los Angeles artist, Larry Johnson has worked for over 4 decades investigating the inherent contradictions between the shiny surfaces and underlying cynical logics of American culture. His works reference the languages of animation (especially the fantasy worlds of Walt Disney), graphic and commercial design, and advertising.

  • A limited number of tickets are available to FUN HOME, an emotionally charged and poignant family drama, inspired by the graphic novel of the same name by Alison Bechdel, in which she explores her coming out and the suicide of her domineering father Bruce. Sign up in the Office of Student Activities located in the Student Life Center Room 150E.

  • Transfer Day

    Apr 01| Admissions
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    At Transfer Day, prospective transfer students are invited to take a tour of campus, have their questions answered in a one-on-one appointment, and learn how to make a smooth transition to Otis College. If you are considering transferring into one of our programs, please join us on Saturday, April 1, 2017 from 12-3pm. 

     

  • Edgar Arceneaux was born in Los Angeles in 1972. He investigates historical patterns through drawings, installations, and multimedia events, such as the reenactment of Ben Vereen’s tragically misunderstood blackface performance at Ronald Reagan’s 1981 Inaugural Gala.

  • Rejuvenating Yoga

    Apr 04| Student Event
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    All students and Otis College community welcomed and encouraged to participate. Visiting artist Catherine Tingey facilitates the Yoga class!

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture REDUX.5 by Michiel Riedijk at MOCA.

     

    Michiel Riedijk regularly lectures at universities, cultural institutions and symposia worldwide. His theories and writings on architecture have gained international recognition from fellow architects and scholars. The work of Neutelings Riedijk Architects has received worldwide appreciation through numerous publications, international awards and exhibitions around the world. - Neutelings Riedijk Architects

O-Tube

Celebrating The Woman's Building on International Women's Day

In Conversation with Sue Maberry

"Women are powerful, incredible artists with a lot to say."

International Women’s Day is a movement to celebrate the achievements of women and be a force for a more inclusive, gender equal world. Perhaps one of the greatest success stories of creating space, community, and equality for female artists can be found in the Woman's Building. From its founding in 1973 to its closing in 1991, the Woman’s Building was a potent symbol of women’s creative community. Its exhibitions, performances, readings, lectures, public projects, and educational programs inspired and fostered generations of women artists, writers, performers, and scholars.

Sue Maberry, Director of Library and Instructional Technology at Otis College of Art and Design, was a project director at the Women's Building and has been actively involved in preserving its history. Currently a member of the Woman's Building Board of Directors, she recently participated in the Woman’s Building: Animating the Archives panel at the L.A. Art Book Fair and was featured by KCET in the spotlight piece The Woman’s Building: L.A.’s “Feminist Mecca.”

Maberry was also vital in the development of Doin' It in Public: Feminism and Art at the Woman's Building presented by Otis College's Ben Maltz Gallery in 2011. The exhibition sought to document, contextualize and pay tribute to the groundbreaking work of feminist artists and art cooperatives that were centered in and around the Woman's Building in the 1970s and 1980s. Doin' It In Public was part of the Pacific Standard Time: Art in LA 1945-1980 collaboration, initiated by the Getty, to tell the story of the birth of the L.A. art scene. Doin' It In Public was the first exhibition to fully explore the contributions of the Woman’s Building and included capturing the oral history through commissioned interviews with prominent artists and leaders of the movement including Sheila de Bretteville, Terry Wolverton, Suzanne Lacy, Mother Art, The Waitresses, and many others.

To celebrate International Women's Day, we asked Maberry about her time at the Woman's Building and how its tradition is being carried on by a new generation. 

 

How did you first become involved with the Woman’s Building?

It was 1976, and I was in college taking art and women’s studies classes. I found out about the Woman's Building through the New Woman’s Survival Catalog and immediately knew I had to be there.

 

Is there something you learned during your time there that you still carry with you?

That art makes a difference in people’s lives and culture. That women are powerful, incredible artists with a lot to say.

 

How important is documenting and archiving these stories and works in ensuring female artists are given parity in art history classes and museum walls?

Just as the original Woman’s Building of 1893 was lost to history for 70 years until Judy Chicago and her students discovered the catalog in a second-hand bookstore, the Woman’s Building founded in 1973 was almost lost to history. So much of what is exciting nowadays owes much to the creativity and persistence of all our foremothers. I am very grateful to Otis for supporting the online database which began in 1997 as part of the Getty Information Institute's "Faces of L.A." Project. More than 1500 images documenting both featured artists and their projects were selected and digitized. Then in 2011, Otis supported Doin' It in Public: Feminism and Art at the Woman's Building curated by Meg Linton and funded by the Getty’s the Pacific Standard Time initiative. These projects have been incredible in preserving women’s history in the arts. 

 

What does the Women's Building seek to achieve today and how can people become involved with the organization?

We exist now only to preserve the history. Metabolic Studio discovered the Woman’s Building and became interested in archiving the history. Through their grant, we are able to fund emerging women artists who want to create new work that “animates the archives.” The resulting work, accompanied by several events, will be on exhibit at Avenue 50 Studio, 131 North Avenue 50, Highland Park, CA 90042, from Saturday, May 13 through Saturday, June 3, 2017.

 

The work that came out of the Woman’s Building has informed many contemporary feminist and social justice artists, do you think that the Woman’s Building could be revived by a new generation?

In a sense, the Woman's Building accomplished many of its goals. Women artists are visible and important contributors to art and culture now. But many young women are still hungry for spaces where they can network and collaborate and discuss issues. The Women’s Center for Creative Work is a not-for-profit organization that cultivates L.A.’s feminist creative communities and practices. I see them as one group carrying on the tradition of the Woman's Building. They are doing great work and it’s appropriate for this generation to define and create organizations that support their needs now.

 

To learn more about the Woman's Building, visit www.womansbuilding.org. The Doin' It In Public: Feminism and Art at the Woman's Building exhibition catalog is available for purchase through Amazon.

 

KCET's The Woman’s Building: L.A.’s “Feminist Mecca”.

Image: Group of women from the Feminist Studio Workshop pose while making a banner that reads The Art of Community, 1979. Photo: Florence Rosen

 

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