Events
  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 4:00 - 5:00 pm is Welcome to the Haunted Boulevard. Join DJ Platinum (Grace Potter) and DJ Batsy (Jessi Hita) for a journey of the folklores, urban legends, and paranormal encounters from different cultures. 

     

    Listen online at KLMU.

  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

  • Mexican artist Yoshua Okón’s videos blur the lines between documentary, reality, and fiction. He collaborates closely with his actors (often amateurs who are also the subjects of the work) to create sociological examinations that ask viewers to contemplate uncomfortable situations and circumstances.
  • Dana Johnson is the author of the short story collection In the Not Quite Dark. She is also the author of Break Any Woman Down, winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, and the novel Elsewhere, California.

  • Gallery 169 will be hosting the Otis College of Art and Design Communication Arts Graphic Design Junior Show, "5328," displaying a selection of work made over the five thousand twenty eight hours that make up the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Work will include collected posters, publications, and typographic projects.
  • Clay, Body is a solo exhibition from artist Sydney Aubert: Unapologetically fat, crass, and sexual, a ceramics artist who also works in video, and whatever other materials arouse her in the moment. Exhibition will be on view from Monday, April 24 - Friday, April 28 at the Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design. On view by appointment only, please contact the artist at sydney.aubert@gmail.com Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6pm-9pm Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design

  • Audrey Wollen is a feminist theorist and visual artist based in Los Angeles. Wollen uses social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, as platforms for her work on Sad Girl Theory, a theory which posits that internalized female sadness can be used as a radical and political action, separate from masculinized forms of protests such as anger and violence. She introduces this form of protest as an alternative to masculinized anger and violence.

O-Tube

'Artbound': Alumna Camille Rose Garcia’s Psychedelic World

'I’ve Always Used My Imagination As An Escape Tool'
By Sarah Linn, KCET Artbound

Reprinted from KCET Artbound, March 13, 2017 

"Three women — a wizened witch, a sleek, pipe-smoking femme fatale and a bare-chested school girl sporting a mini-skirt and a sword — shimmy up the hairy shank of a monstrous wolf. It’s not just the beast that’s foreboding; part of his massive torso has been replaced by a melty mountain range with a gaping chasm at its center.  

"There’s always the battle, I feel, as a female. You’re always going to be fighting. And you’re always going to be fighting something really big," said Southern California native Camille Rose Garcia, whose painting "Someone’s in the Wolf" illustrates that conflict using characters straight out of a feverish fairy tale. (Another painting, "Lolita Phantasm," shows the aftermath of that fight — two battered beauties standing on either side of the wolf’s decapitated head, filling their brimming chalices with his blood. "They’re coming into their power and [becoming] aware of their strength," the artist explained.)

Blending beauty, horror and humor, Garcia, 46, uses the visual language of vintage cartoons and classic children’s stories — filtered through a surreal, psychedelic lens — to explore such subjects as female sexuality, feminine identity and the cultural clash between the manmade, natural and spiritual worlds. The result is equal parts Edward Gorey and Brothers Grimm; Walt Disney by way of David Lynch; Betty Boop with a dash of William S. Burroughs."

Read the full feature...
Source: https://www.kcet.org/shows/artbound/through-the-looking-glass-camille-rose-garcias-surreal-psychedelic-world

Image: Camille Rose Garcia, "Lolita Phantasm." | Courtesy of Corey Helford Gallery

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