Events
  • Mining fields like education, cinema, psychology, literature and art history Anna Craycroft examines cultural models for fostering individuality. Through drawings, paintings, videos, sculptures, furniture, installations, books, workshops, or curatorial projects she works thematically on a single thesis over a series of exhibitions.

  • In his lecture, Laurence Rickels reenters the exchange between Walter Benjamin and Alexander Mette, which led to Mette’s review of Ursprung des deutschen Trauerspiels in Imago and brought Benjamin to consider the clinical picture of schizophrenia, the topic of Mette’s dissertation-book, which he in turn reviewed.

  • Artist Anna Craycroft, of the current exhibition Tuning the Room in Ben Maltz Gallery, in discussion with artist and curator Micah Silver.

  • Emily Thorpe's art work addresses the twisting formation of memory through spatial relations and moments of domesticity. She will be presenting a solo exhibition for her Graduate Thesis at The Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art & Design, on view February 20 to February 25, 2017. There will be a closing reception on Saturday, February 25, 6-9pm.

  • Solmaz Sharif

    Mar 01| Lectures
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    Solmaz Sharif’s first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press and is a 2016 National Book Award finalist. Her poetry has appeared in the New Republic, Granta, Poetry, and other journals. Her first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press. A former Stegner Fellow, she is currently a lecturer at Stanford University and lives in the Bay Area.

  • Brendan Folwer was born 1978, Berkeley, California and lives and works in Los Angeles. His solo exhibitions include New Portraits (2017), Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, Portraits (2016), Mathew, New York and New Pictures, Six Sampler Works, and Benches (2015), Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles.

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Nekeya Billingslea: 2007 TLC Technology Grant Report


Excerpt:

Instructor's Journal for the OtisStar Blog

Before:

The first thing I did for this project was familiarize myself with Blogger. Although I had visited blog sites and considered myself relatively knowledgeable of the technology, I felt I needed a little more information to actually create one. So, at the suggestion of Kathlen Forrest, I signed up for the Lynda.com tutorial. It was great. What it helped me do was plan and organize the blog site while trouble-shooting at the same time. Also, I continued to visit blog sites to get ideas for what I could possibly do. I especially decided to focus on sites created by artists and sites for artists.

I already had an idea of the kinds of prompts and discussions I wanted us to have. One early morning, at 3 a.m., I woke up and all of the questions I wanted to ask the class came to me. Actually, that was the most stressful part of this project. In my opionion, it doesn't matter how fancy or visually attractive a site is; if it doesn't have meaningful content, especially for a class, then it still doesn't mean much.

Week 1:

Creating the site was a virtual breeze (pun intended.) Everything is up and running. I put images up and it is looking quite neat. After I posted the first prompt, their responses trickled and surprised me pleasantly. This thing began to take on a life of its own. In the layout of the site, I didn't have a prompt section. The prompt was embedded in my initial post. So, after a few responese, the prompt was lost. What happened is that students began posting responses to each other's posts. The prompt was entirely lost. For a few seconds I was irritiated --- I think more at myself that at the students or the unexpected turn of events. Why didn't I foresee that? Then I began to really appreciate the life that the discussion took on of its own accord. It reminded me that I am only a faciliatator and catalyst of sorts. I was pleased to discover that my role is secondary and that this site is all about the students' discussion and exploration of ideas.

--Nekeya Billingslea
Liberal Arts and Sciences

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