Events
  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 4:00 - 5:00 pm is Welcome to the Haunted Boulevard. Join DJ Platinum (Grace Potter) and DJ Batsy (Jessi Hita) for a journey of the folklores, urban legends, and paranormal encounters from different cultures. 

     

    Listen online at KLMU.

  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

  • Mexican artist Yoshua Okón’s videos blur the lines between documentary, reality, and fiction. He collaborates closely with his actors (often amateurs who are also the subjects of the work) to create sociological examinations that ask viewers to contemplate uncomfortable situations and circumstances.
  • Dana Johnson is the author of the short story collection In the Not Quite Dark. She is also the author of Break Any Woman Down, winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, and the novel Elsewhere, California.

  • Gallery 169 will be hosting the Otis College of Art and Design Communication Arts Graphic Design Junior Show, "5328," displaying a selection of work made over the five thousand twenty eight hours that make up the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Work will include collected posters, publications, and typographic projects.
  • Clay, Body is a solo exhibition from artist Sydney Aubert: Unapologetically fat, crass, and sexual, a ceramics artist who also works in video, and whatever other materials arouse her in the moment. Exhibition will be on view from Monday, April 24 - Friday, April 28 at the Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design. On view by appointment only, please contact the artist at sydney.aubert@gmail.com Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6pm-9pm Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design

  • Audrey Wollen is a feminist theorist and visual artist based in Los Angeles. Wollen uses social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, as platforms for her work on Sad Girl Theory, a theory which posits that internalized female sadness can be used as a radical and political action, separate from masculinized forms of protests such as anger and violence. She introduces this form of protest as an alternative to masculinized anger and violence.

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Suzanne Lacy featured in Citizen Culture Exhibition at SMOA

Graduate Public Practice Chair Suzanne Lacy was included in Citizen Culture: Artists and Architects Shape Policy on view at the Santa Monica Museum of Art through December 13, 2014. 

Source: smmoa.org

Artist Suzanne Lacy’s participatory, legislative project No Blood/No Foul represents her work with Oakland youth activists, City Council, and the Mayor’s Office to draft a new youth policy in 1997. On June 5, 1997, the eve of the Oakland City Council’s vote on a newly drafted Youth Policy Initiative, Lacy staged a performance in the form of a basketball game between youth and police officers. No Blood/No Foul was a collaboration with Michelle Baughan, Stan Hebert, Annice Jacoby, Chris Johnson, Councilwoman Sheila Jordan, Mike Shaw, Officer Terrance West, and Frank Williams. The project was one of The Oakland Projects, a series of eight public initiatives Lacy organized with youth and adult collaborators under the acronym TEAM (Teens, Educators, Artists, and Media Makers) between 1991 and 2000. No Blood/No Foul and its legislative processes are presented as a video and mixed media installation created for Citizen Culture.

Citizen Culture explores the intersection of art and politics and doubles as a platform for open dialogue and engagement. It features the work of artists, architects, designers, creative thinkers, and collectives who have reshaped public policy using aesthetic strategies: Ala Plástica (Silvina Babich and Alejandro Meitín), Tania Bruguera, Suzanne Lacy, Michael Maltzan, The Medellín Diagram (Teddy Cruz, Fonna Forman, Matthias Goerlich, and Alejandro Echeverri), Antanas Mockus with Futuro Moncada, and Tamms Year Ten. Through photographs, videos, maps, drawings, architectural models, performances, and activism, Citizen Culture celebrates the power of art to spark dialogue, create new modes of civic engagement, and transform the laws by which cities and citizens are governed. Organized by independent curator Lucía Sanromán, the exhibition spans projects from six cities in the Americas: Oakland, California; Los Angeles, California; Chicago, Illinois; Medellín, Colombia; Bogotá, Colombia; and La Plata, Argentina. Citizen Culture examines effectiveness and outcomes within the growing field of social practice by exclusively featuring projects that have transformed legislation and society.

The projects in Citizen Culture serve as case studies for how artists can work directly with municipal governments, NGOs, legislators, and advocates to effect change.

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