Events
  • In conjunction with the current exhibition Patterns Bigger Than Any of Us: Jesse Fleming / Pat O'Neill in Ben Maltz Gallery, May 7 - August 12, 2017.

    In Conversation: Jesse Fleming and Pat O'Neill, moderated by LA-based idependent curator and historian Ciara Moloney

     

    Jesse Fleming (b. 1977) is part of an emerging group of artists and technologists that examine the convergence of media art and mindfulness. Recent solo exhibitions were held at Five Car Garage; 356 Mission; and Night Gallery, all in Los Angeles, CA; and the University of Texas in Austin, TX.

    Pat O’Neill’s (b. 1939) artistic and filmmaking career spans over 50 years, and he is highly-regarded for his experiments with film and optical printing. Recent solo exhibitions were held at Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive in Berkeley, CA; Monitor in Rome, Italy; VeneKlasen/Werner in Berlin, Germany; Quinta do Quetzal in Vidigueira, Portugal; Mitchell-Innes & Nash in New York, NY; and Cherry and Martin in Los Angeles, CA.

    Ciara Moloney is an independent curator, editor, and writer based in Los Angeles. She was formerly Curator of Exhibitions and Projects at Modern Art Oxford where she curated exhibitions by Barbara Kruger, Josh Kline, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Christian Boltanski and Kiki Kogelnik.

  • Amelia Gray is the author of the short story collections AM/PM, Museum of the Weird, and Gutshot, as well as the novels Threats and, most recently, Isadora, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Tin House, and VICE. She is winner of the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, of FC2's Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. 

  • Luis J. Rodriguez was Los Angeles Poet Laureate from 2014-2016. The twenty-fifth edition of his first book, Poems Across the Pavement, won a 2015 Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement. He has written fourteen other books of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and nonfiction, including the best-selling memoir Always Running: La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A. Rodriguez is also founding editor of Tia Chucha Press and co-founder of Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural & Bookstore in the San Fernando Valley. In 2016 Tia Chucha Press produced the largest anthology of L.A.-area poets, Coiled Serpent: Poets Arising from the Cultural Quakes & Shifts of Los Angeles. Rodriguez’s last memoir It Calls You Back: An Odyssey Through Love, Addiction, Revolutions, and Healing was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award. His latest poetry collection Borrowed Bones appeared in 2016 from Curbstone Books/Northwestern University Press.

  • Raised in Philadelphia, with roots in South Africa and Trinidad, Zinzi Clemmons’ writing has appeared in Zoetrope: All-Story, Transition, The Paris Review Daily, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships and support from the MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the Kimbilio Center for African American Fiction. She is co-founder and former Publisher of Apogee Journal, and a Contributing Editor to LitHub. She teaches literature and creative writing at the Colburn Conservatory and Occidental College. Her debut novel, What We Lose, as well as a second title, are forthcoming from Viking.

  • Louise Sandhaus is a graphic designer and graphic design educator. She was previously Director of the Graphic Design Program at CalArts where she currently is faculty. Her recent book on California graphic design, Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires and Riots: California and Graphic Design 1936-1986, co-published by Metropolis Books and Thames & Hudson, has received laudatory reviews from The New York Times, The Guardian, Eye, and Creative Review. The book received the Palm d’Argent for best art book at FILAF (International Festival of Art Books and Films on Art).

  • Photo Credit: Jesse Pniak

     

    F. Douglas Brown received the 2013 Cave Canem Poetry Prize (selected by Tracy K. Smith) for Zero to Three, published by the University of Georgia. He also co-authored the chapbook Begotten with Geffrey Davis as part of Upper Rubber Boot Book's Floodgate Poetry Series. Both a past Cave Canem and Kundiman Fellow, his poems have appeared in the Academy of American Poets, The Virginia Quarterly, Bat City Review, The Chicago Quarterly Review, The Southern Humanities Review, The Sugar House Review, Cura Magazine, and Muzzle Magazine. He is co-founder and curator of un::fade::able - The Requiem for Sandra Bland, a quarterly reading series examining restorative justice through poetry as a means to address racism. Brown currently teaches English at Loyola High School in Los Angeles.

  • Emily Raboteau’s nonfiction work Searching for Zion was named a best book of 2013 by the Huffington Post and the San Francisco Chronicle, and was a finalist for the Hurston Wright Legacy Award, grand prize winner of the New York Book Festival, and a winner of a 2014 American Book Award. She is the author of a novel, The Professor’s Daughter, and her fiction and essays have been published and anthologized in Best American Short Stories, the New York Times, The New Yorker, Tin House, Buzzfeed, LitHub, The Guardian, Guernica, Virginia Quarterly, The Believer, and Salon. Other honors include a Pushcart Prize, the Chicago Tribune’s Nelson Algren Award, and fellowships from the NEA, the Lannan Foundation, and the MacDowell Colony. Raboteau teaches creative writing at City College in New York.

O-Tube

Marcie Begleiter: 2006 TLC Technology Grant Report


Report:

Mind Mapping in the Classroom -- and Beyond…

In the Spring of ’06 I taught a Senior Thesis Preparation course in the Digital Media Dept. As a research exercise I required the students to create a “MindMap” of their proposed Senior Thesis topic based on the process and theory described in Tony Buzan’s 1993 classic, The Mind Map Book. The results were so engaging and useful that we decided to expand the use of this process and create a series of maps that would chart not only the basics of the project’s content but also the details of character development, environmental history and narrative structure.

The basic tenet behind the Mind Mapping process is that the mind works in a more efficient manner if its structure is reflected in the product of its work. In other words, in order to tap into the extraordinary power of the mind to create and organize thoughts, it is crucial to utilize a methodology that is non-linear and flexible. That said, a stacked list such as that used in shopping for groceries might not be the best approach to brainstorming a complex project such as a senior thesis, a book outline or even a trip abroad.

Buzan’s method not only uses non-linear forms but also blends in color and image to complete the mapping metaphor. And while there are certainly many approaches to brainstorming including cluster mapping, Ven diagramming and flow-charting, in working with students of art and design this multi-disciplinary approach to project planning is particularly apt. As one student in this class stated:

"The mind mapping method taught to me by Marcie Begleiter is not only helpful in organizing ideas, but in expanding them as well. Even outside of the context of school work, I've used it extensively for not only brainstorming, but also organizing ideas. It helps me organize my thoughts in a non-linear manner while still being a concise organizing system."
--MC Griffin (Senior Thesis 2 terms, Thesis Prep, 1 term)

And this:

"My thesis concept was developed and driven by mind map exploration. I started off with the idea of transitions and explored more personally, which then developed into the transition of my adoption. It helped to start using the traditional hand drawn mind map development vs. the digital. I found it distracting to use the computer, because everything typed seemed final. Using the mind map as if it were rough sketching my ideas was definitely a much more effective way for me to brainstorm. I would say mind mapping my idea enabled me to have a backbone to my piece."
--Andersan Saakvitne (Senior Thesis,1 term and Senior Thesis Prep 1 Term)

These students went on to not only use traditional mindmapping in developing his senior thesis, but also worked with Mind Mapping software in scheduling the project in Senior Year. I purchased Matchware’s "OpenMind" software to use in the classroom because of it’s adherence to Buzan’s method. Another student wrote of her experience in the classroom:

"The mind mapping software is a great program. I used it for my senior thesis. The thesis is a one minute animation of a much larger story. I drew mind maps by hand at first and it is a messy business to write out all the possible characters, locations, plots and relationships. I used this software and the process is so much cleaner and better organized. I also used it to figure out what I need to to do to execute the thesis. I broke down shots and the animation. I separated tasks to get a bigger picture of the work and time needed to complete the thesis. glad to have it at hand."
--Diana Huang (Senior Thesis 2 terms, Thesis Prep, 1 term)

One additional note on the "OpenMind" software: the mind maps can be instantly converted into word docs, html files or a number of other useful formats. In addition the software comes complete with hundreds of spot illustrations and it is easy to import images of your own choosing. It also has many study templates including one for basic essay construction that believe may be a valuable asset for some liberal studies courses.

I am a convert – and available for spreading the liturgy.

--Marcie Begleiter
Digital Media

Otis College Ranked 6th in Nation by The Economist