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Events
  • Visit the Campus. Get advice on your portfolio. Talk to faculty and students. Learn more about financial aid.

     

    Register now for Open House 2014.

     

    CHECK-IN BEGINS AT 12:30
    WORKSHOPS 

    1:00 – 1:45
    Financing Your Education
    Center for Creative Professions: Create Your Future 

    2:00 – 2:45
    Housing Options: Making a Good Fit

  • Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week 4-6pm is Waves to Asia with DJ Pheonix, DJ Z and DJ Kai, bringing some Asian culture to the air waves, including J-Pop, K-Pop and Chinese Pop, as well as popular anime music. Also as part of the show we will feature a talk about Asian food that you can get and try in Los Angeles.

     

  • Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

    This week 4-5pm is Rewind 1976 with DJ’s Gabriel Rojas, Nauseous P, and Little C. Join us to count down the songs on the top of the charts... 1976 style. We'll be playing the hits as if it's that very Autumn day 30+ years ago.

  • Otis Radio: Rap Realm

    Nov 10| Special Event
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    Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

  • Scott Short

    Nov 11| Lectures
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    Scott Short | Born 1964 in Marion, OH | Lives and works in Paris, France 

     

  • Cathy Park Hong's poetry collections include Translating Mo'um and Dance Dance Revolution, which was chosen for the Barnard Women Poets Prize. Norton published her third book of poems, Engine Empire, in 2012. A former Fullbright Fellow, Hong is also the recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the New York Foundation for the Arts. Her poems have been appeared in A Public Space, Poetry, Paris Review, Conjunctions, McSweeney's, APR, Harvard Review, Boston Review, The Nation, and other journals.

  • Monica Majoli

    Nov 13| Lectures
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    Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artist, Monica Majoli.

    Thursday, November 13th 11:115am - 12:30pm

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

O-Tube

Types of Information

Identifying the intended audience for information is one step in evaluating information. The descriptions of types of information below can apply equally to periodicals, books, and web pages. See also CRAAP Detection.

Academic, Scholarly, Peer Reviewed

  • Articles written by scholars or researchers in the field, often faculty with Ph.Ds
  • Almost always lists sources and/or includes a bibliography
  • Reports on original research or experimentation
  • Often published by a university press, research center or academic association
  • May contain visual information including charts and graphs that is appropriate and specific to the field and discipline.
  • May be scholarly because of the credentials of the writers, but targeted towards students, such as an encyclopedia
  • Not usually available on a newsstand
  • Examples of periodicals: Fashion Theory, Domus, Art History, Art Bulletin, Journal of the American Medical Association
     

Industry /Trade / Professional Publications

(sometimes referred to as "Professional")

  • Written for (and usually by) people in an industry or field rather than a university professor
  • Assumes knowledge of the field
  • Not usually available on the newsstand
  • Only sometimes lists sources or includes bibliography
  • Often published by a professional association
  • Examples of periodicals: American Libraries, Playthings, Communication Arts, Animation Magazine
     

Substantive News

  • Often glossy in appearance with color illustrations
  • Sometimes list sources or includes bibliography
  • Usually available on the newsstand
  • Articles usually have a named author/s
  • Level of writing geared to educated or well-read audience
  • Examples of periodicals: National Geographic, Art in America, Artforum, Wall Street Journal, Discover
     

Popular

  • Easily purchased on newsstands, bookstores or available for free via the Internet
  • Geared towards general audiences
  • Articles written by staff writers or freelance writers 
  • Slick or glossy (in print version), with lots of advertising
  • Seldom includes list of sources 
  • Examples of periodicals: People, Sports Illustrated, Vogue, Rolling Stone
     

Sensational

  • Variety of styles, but often newspaper format when in print
  • Language is elementary and occasionally inflammatory or sensational
  • Often unsigned
  • Purpose is to arouse curiosity and to cater to popular superstitions
  • Flashy headlines designed to astonish
  • Examples of periodicals/websites: National Enquirer, Star, some Yahoo News