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Events
  • Angie Bray: Shhhh

    Jan 17| Exhibition
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    Angie Bray: Shhhh

    January 17 – March 22, 2015

    Opening Reception: January 24, 4-6pm

    Angie Bray: Shhhh is a substantial exhibition of the Los Angeles–based artist’s installations, photographs, drawings, sculpture and video organized by guest curator Meg Linton for the Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis College of Art and Design. The exhibition opens on Saturday, January 17, 2015.

    About the Exhibition

  • Opening Reception for Angie Bray: Shhhh a substantial exhibition of the Los Angeles–based artist’s installations, photographs, drawings, sculpture and video organized by guest curator Meg Linton for the Ben Maltz Gallery.

  • Walk-thru the exhibition Shhhh led by the artist Angie Bray. Gain insight into Bray's work and to the exhibition, and hear about her process, materials, and philosophies on art-making and on quieting, listening, and looking.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture REDUX.3 by JAMES CORNER


    Wednesday    18 February 2015    7:30 PM
    Ahmanson Auditorium   limited, open seating starting at 7:00 PM  

    at THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES

    250 SOUTH GRAND AVENUE  LOS ANGELES CA  90012

     

    This lecture is free and open to the public.

     

  • Bassoon Performance

    Feb 22| Special Event
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    Bassoonist John Steinmetz Performs and Converses with the Audience
    Playing live bassoon inside the exhibition Angie Bray: Shhhh, Steinmetz will react to Bray’s installations by playing some of his own music as well as new compositions, and will converse with the audience, who are encouraged to sit or roam through the gallery looking and listening.

  • Composer Kubilay Üner offers a “reactive” experience with a live presentation of a new composition made in response to the exhibition Angie Bray: Shhhh. The performance will be interspersed with conversation between Üner and Bray.

  • Closing reception for exhibition Angie Bray: Shhhh

O-Tube

Types of Information

Identifying the intended audience for information is one step in evaluating information. The descriptions of types of information below can apply equally to periodicals, books, and web pages. Use this in your annotations. See also CRAAP Detection.

Academic, Scholarly, Peer Reviewed

  • Articles written by scholars or researchers in the field, often faculty with Ph.Ds
  • Almost always lists sources and/or includes a bibliography
  • Reports on original research or experimentation
  • Often published by a university press, research center or academic association
  • May contain visual information including charts and graphs that is appropriate and specific to the field and discipline.
  • May be scholarly because of the credentials of the writers, but targeted towards students, such as an encyclopedia
  • Not usually available on a newsstand
  • Examples of periodicals: Fashion Theory, Domus, Art History, Art Bulletin, Journal of the American Medical Association
     

Industry /Trade / Professional Publications

(sometimes referred to as "Professional")

  • Written for (and usually by) people in an industry or field rather than a university professor
  • Assumes knowledge of the field
  • Not usually available on the newsstand
  • Only sometimes lists sources or includes bibliography
  • Often published by a professional association
  • Examples of periodicals: American Libraries, Playthings, Communication Arts, Animation Magazine
     

Substantive News

  • Often glossy in appearance with color illustrations
  • Sometimes list sources or includes bibliography
  • Usually available on the newsstand
  • Articles usually have a named author/s
  • Level of writing geared to educated or well-read audience
  • Examples of periodicals: National Geographic, Art in America, Artforum, Wall Street Journal, Discover
     

Popular

  • Easily purchased on newsstands, bookstores or available for free via the Internet
  • Geared towards general audiences
  • Articles written by staff writers or freelance writers 
  • Slick or glossy (in print version), with lots of advertising
  • Seldom includes list of sources 
  • Examples of periodicals: People, Sports Illustrated, Vogue, Rolling Stone
     

Sensational

  • Variety of styles, but often newspaper format when in print
  • Language is elementary and occasionally inflammatory or sensational
  • Often unsigned
  • Purpose is to arouse curiosity and to cater to popular superstitions
  • Flashy headlines designed to astonish
  • Examples of periodicals/websites: National Enquirer, Star, some Yahoo News