Events
  • You can easily spot The Little Friends of Printmaking in a crowd—their inky hands and clothes are a dead giveaway. Their work is just as distinctive. JW & Melissa Buchanan first made a name for themselves through their silkscreened concert posters, but soon branched out into further fields, designing fancy junk for whoever would pay them money. In addition to their work as illustrators and designers, they've continued their fine art pursuits through exhibitions, lectures, and artists’ residencies, spreading the gospel of silkscreen to anyone inclined to listen.

  • "In publishers’ terms, Shock and Awe – a hefty, intellectual book about glam rock – is timely." - Jude Rogers, The Guardian

  • Solmaz Sharif

    Mar 01| Lectures
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    Solmaz Sharif’s first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press and is a 2016 National Book Award finalist. Her poetry has appeared in the New Republic, Granta, Poetry, and other journals. Her first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press. A former Stegner Fellow, she is currently a lecturer at Stanford University and lives in the Bay Area.

  • Join us on Thursday, March 2nd for an evening of conversation and exploration! Connect with fellow alumni, see friends, tour our new buildings, and meet President Ferguson at this Alumni Night reception. It will be a casual and fun evening and we hope you can join us. 

    The evening includes:

    A beer and wine reception 

    Introduction of the new Director of Alumni Relations Phil Scanlon

    Campus tour

    Visits to the Anna Craycroft exhibit at the Ben Maltz Gallery and Millard Sheets Library

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  • Brendan Folwer was born 1978, Berkeley, California and lives and works in Los Angeles. His solo exhibitions include New Portraits (2017), Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, Portraits (2016), Mathew, New York and New Pictures, Six Sampler Works, and Benches (2015), Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles.

  • One of two "Show and Tell" hands-on book events held inside the exhibition Tuning the Room in the Ben Maltz Gallery, featuring selections from the highly regarded Millard Sheets Library Artists’ Books Collection.

     

  • Paul Lisicky

    Mar 08| Lectures
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    Paul Lisicky’s memoirs include The Narrow Door, a New York Times Editors' Choice, and Famous Builder. He is the author of a collection of short prose entitled Unbuilt Projects, and the novels The Burning House, and Lawnboy.

O-Tube

I-Search Paper for Visual Culture

What is an I-Search Paper?

An I-Search Paper helps you learn the nature of searching and discovery on a chosen topic. Your goal is to pay attention, track this exploration, and LEARN HOW YOU LEARN so that you can repeat the process in other courses. The I-Search Paper should be the story of your search process, including chronological reflections on the phases of research in a narrative form. The I is for YOU. It's the story of YOUR search and what you learned. In Visual Culture, the I Search Paper is your Signature Assignment

 

Signature Assignment Prompt:  

From the west to the non-west, Picasso to reality t.v., and political posters to product design, visual culture is broad, all-encompassing, and influential. Based upon your interests, explore a slice of visual culture that you find exciting or, perhaps, troubling. Then ask a question about this topic and start searching for the answer.

Your I Search paper will be a record of your research, your exploration into using databases, an explanation of your process, and finally, how writing this paper has affected or changed your thinking about visual culture.

 

To begin the I-search paper make sure that you understand the terms and assumptions that are embedded within the prompt. As you begin to consider the questions listed below, keep a record of your thought process. This will become part of your I-Search story.

 

Remember, you are not looking for “the answer.” You are not writing a report. You are investigating a topic in an attempt to learn something new about where and how it is discussed in print and other media. In fact, given the personal nature of this paper, your conclusion might offer reflections on what you learned about the topic and about researching.

 

 

Steps

  1. Start with the Databases that are provided for you through the Library website. Art Source is arguably the best for this course. Try it!
  2. Keep track of the actual search terms and specific databases you used and how you modified your strategy as you went along. (See Beginning Your Research). You will include those details in your paper.
  3. Analyze the results. How many hits did you get? Say how and why you modified your search strategy to get more or less. What did you learn about each database that you tried?
  4. Include actual facts and theories that you discovered about your topic as well as idiosyncratic information such as what surprised you. You could say what you already knew about the topic before beginning the research and how what you knew about that topic may have changed during the research process.
  5. If you have trouble finding relevant articles or books in the Library, ask a librarian. They have Master's Degrees in research, are more discerning than search engines. Plus, they are happy to assist!
  6. You will then create a bibliography of at least 2 sources (books and/or journal articles) that MUST be found through the Otis databases and/or the OPAC (book catalog). You may also include websites if you used them, but those will be in addition to the 2.
  7. You must annotate and evaluate the sources in the bibliography. Remember, the annotations must include the credentials of the author and the type of information (scholarly, popular, etc.), and the intented autience of the publication. (See Sample Annotations, CRAAP Detection  and Types of Information.

 

 Remember that research is a creative process. Use your creative thinking skills in the research process. Explore widely, question, learn, and keep revising your strategy as needed.