Events
  • Todd Bradford Richmond presents a solo exhibition of new paintings and installation for his Graduate Thesis at The Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art & Design, on view January 22 to February 1, 2017 (closes at 12noon on Feb 1). There will be an artist reception on Saturday, January 28, 2-6pm.

  • Tim Davis's wry photographs find the sublime in the quotidian. Whether shooting an abandoned pair of sneakers, the streets of a nameless suburb, or the corner of a framed painting in a museum, Davis captures the peripheral, everyday beauty of our daily life.

  • Under Armour on Campus

    Jan 24| Student Event
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    Career Services is hosting Under Armour for Lunch & Learn and portfolio reviews. They are actively recruiting for paid summer internships and post grad employment in the following areas: Accessories Design Apparel Design Graphic Design – Apparel, Brand, Retail and Web Film & Video Production Footwear Design Technical Design, Patternmaking & Product Fit
  • Otis College of Art and Design and The Art and Design Department at California State University Dominguez Hills will be partnering to bring two Ceramics Artist, Diego Romero ('90) and Michael Sherrill to give a guest lecture and workshop demonstration to take place at both campuses in conjunction with the 73rd Scripps Ceramic Annua, curated by Joan Takayama-Ogawa (Otis College Faculty member).

  • Workshop at Otis College campus with ceramic artist, Michael Sherrill.

  • James Hannaham

    Jan 25| Lectures
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    James Hannaham is the author of the novels Delicious Foods, which won the 2016 PEN/Faulkner Award, and God Says No, a Stonewall Honor Book and a Lambda Literary Award finalist.

  • Asher Hartman is an interdisciplinary artist, playwright and director whose work at the junction of visual art and theater centers on the exploration of the self in relation to Western histories and ideologies. 

O-Tube

I-Search Paper for Visual Culture

What is an I-Search Paper?

An I-Search Paper helps you learn the nature of searching and discovery on a chosen topic. Your goal is to pay attention, track this exploration, and LEARN HOW YOU LEARN so that you can repeat the process in other courses. The I-Search Paper should be the story of your search process, including chronological reflections on the phases of research in a narrative form. The I is for YOU. It's the story of YOUR search and what you learned. In Visual Culture, the I Search Paper is your Signature Assignment

 

Signature Assignment Prompt:  

From the west to the non-west, Picasso to reality t.v., and political posters to product design, visual culture is broad, all-encompassing, and influential. Based upon your interests, explore a slice of visual culture that you find exciting or, perhaps, troubling. Then ask a question about this topic and start searching for the answer.

Your I Search paper will be a record of your research, your exploration into using databases, an explanation of your process, and finally, how writing this paper has affected or changed your thinking about visual culture.

 

To begin the I-search paper make sure that you understand the terms and assumptions that are embedded within the prompt. As you begin to consider the questions listed below, keep a record of your thought process. This will become part of your I-Search story.

 

Remember, you are not looking for “the answer.” You are not writing a report. You are investigating a topic in an attempt to learn something new about where and how it is discussed in print and other media. In fact, given the personal nature of this paper, your conclusion might offer reflections on what you learned about the topic and about researching.

 

 

Steps

  1. Start with the Databases that are provided for you through the Library website. Art Source is arguably the best for this course. Try it!
  2. Keep track of the actual search terms and specific databases you used and how you modified your strategy as you went along. (See Beginning Your Research). You will include those details in your paper.
  3. Analyze the results. How many hits did you get? Say how and why you modified your search strategy to get more or less. What did you learn about each database that you tried?
  4. Include actual facts and theories that you discovered about your topic as well as idiosyncratic information such as what surprised you. You could say what you already knew about the topic before beginning the research and how what you knew about that topic may have changed during the research process.
  5. If you have trouble finding relevant articles or books in the Library, ask a librarian. They have Master's Degrees in research, are more discerning than search engines. Plus, they are happy to assist!
  6. You will then create a bibliography of at least 2 sources (books and/or journal articles) that MUST be found through the Otis databases and/or the OPAC (book catalog). You may also include websites if you used them, but those will be in addition to the 2.
  7. You must annotate and evaluate the sources in the bibliography. Remember, the annotations must include the credentials of the author and the type of information (scholarly, popular, etc.), and the intented autience of the publication. (See Sample Annotations, CRAAP Detection  and Types of Information.

 

 Remember that research is a creative process. Use your creative thinking skills in the research process. Explore widely, question, learn, and keep revising your strategy as needed.