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Events
  • Presidents' Day Holiday

    Feb 15| Academic Dates
    More

    Otis offices are closed for the Holiday.

  • Oliver Kellhammer is an independent artist, writer and researcher, who seeks, through his botanical interventions and social art practice, to demonstrate nature’s surprising ability to recover from damage. His recent work has focused on the psychosocial effects of climate change, cleaning up contaminated soils, reintroducing prehistoric trees to landscape damaged by industrial logging and cataloging the ecology of brownfield ecologies. He currently works as a lecturer in sustainable systems at Parsons in New York City.
     
  • Emily Kendal Frey is the author of the poetry collections The Grief Performance, selected for the Cleveland State Poetry Center's 2010 First Book Prize by Rae Armantrout, and Sorrow Arrow, as well as the the chapbooks Frances, The New Planet, and Airport. The winner of the Poetry Society of America's Norma Farber First Book Award, Frey's poetry has appeared in the journals Octopus and the Oregonian. She lives in Portland.

    Seating is limited.

    Maps & Parking Information

  • Performance : Proust in one hour

    by Véronique Aubouy

    Duration : 60 minutes chrono

    In this performance I try to summarize in 60 minutes In search of past time with my own words, as a story of another time which reveals itself contemporary. I deliver my own intimate and personal perception of this book which radiates in my life. Each performance is another opportunity to explore different zones of the book, proceeding at random, inspired by an aleatory and fickle memory.

  • Rear Window

    Kristin Moore
    Thesis Exhibition
    Feb 16th-19th, 2016

    Reception:

    Thursday, Feb 18th, 6-9PM

    Bolsky Gallery
    Otis College of Art and Design
    9045 Lincoln Blvd. 
    Los Angeles, CA 90045 
    310.846.2614


    Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat-Sun 12pm-4pm

     

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture REDUX.4 by IÑAKI ÁBALOS

  • Mr. Yang Chen worked in real estate development companies for eight years and in architecture design companies for fourteen years, serving as architect, General Manager, and Executive President. From 2002 to 2007 he was General Manager of China Construction Design International (CCDI) Shanghai and COO of its headquarters in Shenzhen. He played a significant role in CCDI’s transition from a regional company of around 100 employees to a national corporation of over 3000 employees.

O-Tube

History of Product Design

Step 1: Review How to Do Research

You may want to refresh your information literacy skills. Tutorials are available.

Step 2: Finding Information in Online Databases

Oxford Art is an encyclopedia with very good background information. Movements like Bauhaus and Postmodernism will be defined, sometimes in great detail. But don't expect every designer to be listed there. Sometimes a design-specific encyclopedia or biographical dictionary, such as Contemporary Designers located in the Reference section of the Library will include more.

The library does not subscribe to any databases that specifically covers design periodicals.

Art Source (aka Art Index) is an excellent database which broadly covers art and design periodicals. It's available through the link to Databases on all Library web pages. Other good databases to try are ProQuest and eLibrary.

Once you get a list of hits, look at them carefully. You can determine a lot simply by reading the titles. Sometimes you will see an indication about the content of the article, such as that it is an exhibition review. Obituaries are generally not critical, but they are often good summations of an artist's career. Ignore the book reviews and reproductions. Those won't help. Notice that the page numbers are listed. Longer articles will probably be more in-depth. Also, notice if there is an author listed. Reviews by known writers are preferable.

Many databases include "full-text" articles. Although originally published in print, it means that the actual article is reproduced there in plain text or a PDF version. Lucky you. You can read the articles on screen, email them to yourself, or print them.

One problematic aspect about databased articles is that you don't see them in the context of the full magazine. Unless you look at the actual original print version, you may have difficulty evaluating the publication. As design students, it's a good idea to become familiar with as many of these periodicals as you can, so do have a look at some of these magazines on the shelves.

Step 3: Locating Older Journal Articles

You should know by now that you won't always find everything online in full-text.  Some databases have no full-text at all. When you need to locate the print version of a periodical, you can use the Otis collection of back issues, which includes hundreds of bound volumes. Some are in the Stacks and some in the Annex, which requires paging. Some databases have a link to the Otis holdings or OPAC. Or you can look in Library's Magazine Holdings List.

Step 4: Finding Books and Exhibition Catalogs

Use the OPAC to find exhibition catalogs and books about your artist or designer. Sometimes the Table of Contents will be included in the OPAC and there may be a chapter about your designer or movement. Search broadly at first by using the "keyword" search box.

An catalog, by definition, includes lists and images of works from a particular museum or gallery exhibition of the artist's work. They often include essays written by the curator or critics. It's probably an exhibition catalog if it is published by a gallery/museum and if the word "exhibitions" appears in the subject field. Sometimes the date of the exhibition appears in the title field.

Designers don't participate in exhibitions as much as artists do. The types of books you will find with information on designers will include yearbooks and annuals from professional organizations and chapters in books about design.

For a list of possible areas to browse, see also the pathfinder for the Product Design Program.

Step 5: Citing Sources

Once you've found everything and read it, you're ready to type up your bibliography. Use the categories described in Types of Information for your annotations. See Sample Annotations. Remember to use MLA style for the citation portion. More about Citing Sources here.

Step 6: Assistance Is Readily Available

The librarians and the library staff are your friends. Ask for reference or computer troubleshooting any time. The SRC also has tutors available to assist you with the writing of papers. Start early so that you will have time to avail yourself of these services. We all want to support your learning experience.

 

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