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Events
  • Ghost particles / THESIS EXHIBITION 



    Exhibition, March 3 - 7, 2015 

    Reception, Thursday March 5, 6:00 - 9:00pm
 

    
Map of Location

     

  • Charlie White

    Mar 03| Lectures
    More
    Charlie White is a photographer and filmmaker whose work has been exhibited internationally since 1999. White holds the position of Associate Professor at the University of Southern California’s Roski School of Fine Arts.
     
  • Torbjørn Rødland is a Los Angeles-based photographer known for portraits, still lives and landscapes that transcend their often banal settings and motifs and move into the otherworldly. Since the late 1990s, his work has been exhibited widely.

     

    Image: Torbjørn-Rødland-courtesy-MACK-www.mackbooks.co.uk

     

    rodland.tumblr.com/

  • Composer Kubilay Üner offers a “reactive” experience with a live presentation of a new composition made in response to the exhibition Angie Bray: Shhhh. The performance will be interspersed with conversation between Üner and Bray.

  • Kathryn Andrews gets some of her best ideas driving around Los Angeles, where the visual contradictions she sees every day find their way into her art. Andrews, who is originally from Mobile, Alabama, is known for the commonplace objects she fabricates from highly polished and painted metal, into which she incorporates inexpensive or borrowed finds, including rented Hollywood props.

  •  

    Los Angeles Premiere Screening of 

    The State of Creativity

    A Look into the Otis Report on the Creative Economy

    Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the formation of a media partnership with KCETLink. The partnership will bring the 2014 Otis Report on the Creative Economy of the Los Angeles Region and the State of California into the digital age through an interactive, multi-platform presentation developed by, and for, KCETLink’s award-winning arts and culture series, Artbound.

  • Sean Cully

    Bolsky Gallery

    Otis College of Art and Design

    9045 Lincoln Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90045
    (310) 846-2614

     

O-Tube

Cultural Studies

Step 1:

If you need to learn the basics of research, visit the Research HowTos section for tutorials covering various aspects of using the Otis library and research tools.

Step 2:

One place to begin your research is to get a broad overview of of your topic. Try one of Otis's online subscription encyclopedias or dictionaries such as the Oxford English Dictionary or World Folklore and Folklife. Just finding the history or origins or words like tattoo or Eucharist could generate many ideas for projects. Note: You will need to think of alternative terms for your subject. For instance, when you don't find lowriders, try  low ridersautomobileshot rods, or  car culture.

Sometimes you may have to turn to actual books for the best information. You might be pleasantly surprised to discover a wealth of valuable, reliable, and academically-oriented material there. Here are four specialized encyclopedias to get you started:

Located in the Reference Section

GR
550
A77
 
Folk and Fairy Tales: A Handbook 
GR
35
F63
 
Folklore: An Encyclopedia of Beliefs, Customs, Tales, Music, and Art
GT
4803
F65
 
Folklore of American Holidays
E
169.1
H2643
 
Handbook of American Popular Culture
E
184
A1
G14
 
Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America
BL
304
D577
 
Myth: A Handbook

Step 3:

Definitely try the OPAC (Library Catalog). Do a keyword search first to get an overview of what books are in the Otis Library, if any. Use only one word at a time and then try different searches using synonyms or related words. Through the OPAC, you may also discover alternate terms that you can use in searching other larger databases.

Step 4:

Find a journal article or two. Start with OmniFile. It's a new database at Otis and has full-text for thousands of magazines and journals covering the area of folklore among other areas. Try a keyword search. If you get too many hits, limit the results to a subject search. Some of your results will be bibliographic citations to journals that Otis Library does not carry. If you want to check our holdings click on this link to the Magazine Holdings List. If Otis doesn't have it, you may be able to find it through another library. If you want to limit your results to only those results for which the full-text is available online, there is a button for that function on the top of the Wilson Omni results page.

Check out the Databases page for more resources.

Step 5:

Search for a content-rich academic/educational websites. Pages ending in .org or .edu may be the best ones, but make sure the author is not a student doing a class assignment or that the page is not simply a course syllabus.

Unless you know exactly what you want to find and are clear on synonyms and alternative terms, you may want to try a directory like ipl2. As search engines go, this is an extremely tiny one. However, each website listed has been carefully selected and reviewed. You'll retrieve the best of the web with the infomercials and junk will be filtered out. Another good directory to scholarly web resources is Infomine. Check out our page on other search engines.

Put in a very broad term like folklore or myth or popular culture. You'll probably get several websites which may, in fact, be free databases that you can browse for ideas. It's a fascinating, but focused way to learn about subjects new to you.

Step 6:

Your instructors will ask that you create a bibliography using the Chicago or MLA Style. Here's a page that covers citing: Citing Sources. Be aware that citing web sources and online databases requires you to indicate the date you accessed it and the name of the provider of the database.

Also, paste your paper into Grammarly.It wiill help you to make sure nothing is plagiarized.

Remember: Librarians are your friends. Ask for reference assistance at any time...