Events
  • Tim Walsh, is the inventor of the board game Blurt!, which sold more than a milion copies. Tim has lincesned toy and game concepts to Hasbro, Mattel, Brio, Educational Insights, Imagine Entertaiment, and others. Be inspired and entertained by the stories behind the creation of blockbuster toys and games.

     

  • James Hannaham

    Jan 25| Lectures
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    James Hannaham is the author of the novels Delicious Foods, which won the 2016 PEN/Faulkner Award, and God Says No, a Stonewall Honor Book and a Lambda Literary Award finalist.

  • Opening Reception and Acoustic Event: “Tuning the Room” lead by Gregory Lenczycki and Ken Goerres. Gastronomic tuning tastings and elixirs provided by Eden Batki.
     

  • The measure and alterations of Craycroft’s “room tuning” are framed in relation to its setting within the art gallery of an art school. In the wake of the U.S. presidential election, and in anticipation of the exhibition runtime falling during the first months of the new administration, Tuning the Room is a proposal to pay attention to the role that art and art education play in how voices are heard.

  • Robin Coste Lewis won the National Book Award for Voyage of the Sable Venus. Her writing has appeared in The Massachusetts Review, Callaloo, The Harvard Gay & Lesbian Review, Transition: Women in Literary Arts, VIDA, Phantom Limb, and Lambda Literary Review. She has taught at Wheaton, Hunter, Hampshire, and the NYU Low-Residency MFA in Paris. Lewis is a fellow of Cave Canem and of the Los Angeles Institute for the Humanities, as well as a Provost’s Fellow in Poetry and Visual Studies at USC.

  • Artist Anna Craycroft, of the current exhibition Tuning the Room in Ben Maltz Gallery, in discussion with artist and curator Micah Silver.

  • Solmaz Sharif

    Mar 01| Lectures
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    Solmaz Sharif’s first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press and is a 2016 National Book Award finalist. Her poetry has appeared in the New Republic, Granta, Poetry, and other journals. Her first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press. A former Stegner Fellow, she is currently a lecturer at Stanford University and lives in the Bay Area.

O-Tube

CRAAP Detection: Criteria for Evaluating Information

War on Bullshit

  Questions to Ask Web Issues

Currency


How recent is the information?

Is it current enough for your topic? 

Has it been updated or revised?

Is the publication/copyright date clearly labeled?


  • Dates not always included on Web pages
  • If included, a date may have various meanings:
  1. Date information first written
  2. Date information placed on Web
  3. Date information last revised

Relevance


Does the information relate to your topic or answer your question?

Is it easy to navigate and read?

Who is the intended audience?

Is the information at an appropriate level (i.e. not too elementary or advanced for your needs)?

Have you looked at a variety of sources before determining this is one you will use?

Would you be comfortable using this source for a research paper?

Are the topics included explored in depth?


  • Is there a contents page, site map, navigation bar?
  • Is it easy to navigate and read?
  • Are special plug-ins required?
  • Is there a way to return to the "home page" to determine the source of the information?
  • Often hard to determine extent of  Web coverage

Authority


Who is the author or creator?

What are the author's qualifications and credentials for writing about this subject?

How reputable is the publisher? 

Are there organization affiliations? And are they reputable?

Does the information provide references or sources for data or quotations?


  • Often difficult to determine authorship of Web sources 
  • Search engines may retrieve pages out of context making it difficult to know where you are
  • If author's name is listed, his/her qualifications are frequently absent 
  • Publisher responsibility often not indicated or easily found

Accuracy


Where does the information come from?

How reliable and free from error is the information? How do you know?

Were there editors and fact checkers?

Is the information supported by evidence?

Has the information been reviewed or refereed?

Can you verify the information in another source or from personal knowledge?

Is the content primarily opinion? Or is it balanced with multiple points of view?

Does the language or tone seem unbiased and free of emotion?


  • Anyone can publish on the Web
  • Web resources may not be verified by editors or checked for accuracy
  • No standards yet developed
  • Web pages move. If you quote this source, will it be available later?
  • Web pages are susceptible to accidental and deliberate alteration

Purpose / Point of View


Is the information presented with a minimum of bias? Is this fact or opinion?

Does the point of view appear objective and impartial?

Are there political, ideological, cultural, religious, institutional or personal biases?

To what extent is the information trying to sway the opinion of the audience?

Who is responsible for its dissemination?

What is the purpose of the information? Is it to inform, teach, sell, entertain or persuade?

Is the creator/author trying to sell you something?

Do the authors/sponsors make their intentions or purpose clear?


  • Goals and aims of the people or groups presenting material is often unclear
  • Web often functions as a "virtual soapbox" 
  • Distinction between advertising and information is blurred on Web

 

See also:
CRAAP Test Worksheet
Crap Detection 101 by Howard Rheingold