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Events
  • Otis Radio: Hot News

    May 02| Special Event
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    Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 5:00 - 6:00 pm is Hot News with DJs Cindy Ho, Ana Molina, and April Oh who cover all the trending NEWS!

     
    Listen online at KLMU.

    All shows will be simulcast on 96.1FM in the Otis Cafe and archived on otisradio.tumblr.com

  • Otis Radio: flashback

    May 02| Special Event
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    Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

    This week from 5:00pm - 6:00pm is flashback: nostalgic static with DJ's Alix, April and Dane. Come listen and chat about nostalgic representations that make us who we are, from music, accessories, to fashion mistakes.


    Listen online at KLMU.

  • Graduate Fine Arts presents

    Now What?

    Class of 2016 Final MFA Exhibition  

     

    Family and Friends Night Celebration: Saturday, May 14, 6-9pm

    Ashton Allen

    Amanda Benefiel

    Ok-Young Choi

    Janet E. Dandridge

    Melany Dierks

    Elif Erkan

    Kathryn Kert Green

    Elizabeth Medina

    Kristin Moore 

    Jeisung Oh

    Zachary Roach

    Regine Rode

     

  • Learn about the Teacher Credentialing process with:

  • Otis Radio Olympics

    May 03| Special Event
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    Otis Radio students Bree Miller, Natasha Carovska and Rania Ann Zahir present Otis Radio Olympics.

    Play Games and Win Prizes!

    Come join them outside to relieve your stress from finals by playing Musical Chairs, Red Light Green Light, Simon Says, and other beloved childhood games.

  • Graduate Public Practice 
    2016 MFA Degree Presentations

    Henderson Blumer
    Jeanette Degollado
    Margarethe Drexel
    Tonya Ingram
    Jenny Kane
    Shefali Mistry
    Beth Ann Morrison
    Catherine SCOTI Scott
     

    EXHIBITIONS AND EVENTS:

     
    Tuesday May 3, 7 – 9:00 p.m. 

    Shefali Mistry leads Michelada Think Tank event on artists of color

  • For decades, the Los Angeles–based artist Lita Albuquerque has blurred distinctions between Land art and Light and Space on increasingly grander scales, whether it be building installations surrounding the pyramids in Egypt or placing sculptures across Antarctica to mirror the formation of the stars. Her cosmic explorations continue with two new bodies of work that are currently being shown at Kohn Gallery in Hollywood, from January 9 through February 27, 2016, and at USC’s Fisher Museum of Art, from January 26 through April 10, 2016.

O-Tube

Contemporary Fashion Culture

For your writing assignments in this course, you will need a combination of books, periodical articles, and websites. This pathfinder is designed to guide you in your research.

Step 1: Pick Your Terms

What are your specific research interests? Although your overall topic is "fashion culture," using that phrase as a search term is problematic. It's too broad to be effective and it does not have a universally accepted meaning. So think of other terms which identify elements associated with "fashion culture" that can more easily be searched. For instance:

  • teens, teenagers, tweens, kids, adolescent, peer group, peers, etc.
  • fashion trends, popularity
  • coolness, cool
  • advertising, advertisements, ads, campaign
  • consumerism, consumers
  • branding, brands, brand names, logos
  • specific company or product names like Nike, Benetton, Calvin Klein, makeup
  • models, modeling, model types, specific names of models
  • youth market, sales, purchasing behavior, promotion, marketing
  • alienation, rebellion
  • body image, peer pressure, sexuality, sex appeal
  • women, gender, masculinity, homoeroticism, politics, etc.
  • race, Latino, hip hop
  • rave culture, drugs, heroin chic
  • celebrities, celebrity, idols,
  • music, skateboarding, surfing, etc.

It's advisable to browse first, gather ideas, and then narrow the topic as you gain a sense of what's available in various places. As you browse, make a list of specific terms or ideas that you can research further.

Step 2: What Kind of Information Do You Want?

Identifying the type of information that you need will greatly help in formulating a search strategy. After your initial browsing, think seriously about your topic and get as specific as you can. Here are some examples of narrow, searchable topics:

  • a history of wearing denim and jeans
  • types of makeup advertising directed at teenage girls (or African American women)
  • an analysis of the influence of Kate Moss written by a scholar
  • tween consumers and their purchasing behavior
  • high heels--their history and ongoing popularity--from a feminist perspective

Next, think about what you expect to find and where to look.

Statistics come in handy when you want to argue cause and effect. You could use "statistics" in combination with another term like "purchasing power."

Popular culture is readily apparent in pictures and advertising. If you want to see ads targeted toward a particular group, find magazines or websites targeted toward those groups and look through them. Magazines of interest in Otis Library include: Adbusters, Arena, Elle, Entertainment Weekly, ESPN, Face, i-d, Source, Spin, Vanity Fair, Vibe, Vogue. There are also databases of historical ads which you can try such as: Ad Access and AdFlip.

Of course, you will definitely want to find a few articles from journals to substantiate your position.

Step 3: Finding the Materials

To find background information, search in online encyclopedias or dictionaries. For instance, Britannica Online is not a bad place to start if you want to find basic information. On "jeans," for instance, there are 2 short paragraphs about their history and purpose. There are also links to "denim" and the "Levi Strauss." If you search "denim" in the Oxford English Dictionary, you will find the earliest use of the word was actually in 1695 in Merchant's Magazine. A fact like this could be just what you need to start off a paper.

To find books, search in the OPAC, the Otis Library Catalog. Remember, this database is relatively small. To begin, use only one term as a keyword. Once you find one book which is interesting, look at the "subject" field for other useful terms.

To find articles, use indexes, also known as subscription databases. In many cases you will find the full-text of the article which was previously published in a journal, magazine, or newspaper. Hint: Start with EBSCO OmniFile or ProQuest, large multidisciplinary databases. Quickly browse general terms and find an article of interest. Look at the "subject" field. The subject terms are sometimes links. If you click on the link, a search of that term will be performed in the subject field only. This will narrow your search considerably. Example.

To find websites, use search engines. Google is one of the largest. Yahoo, which is one of the most popular, is really more of a directory of selected sites. If you want an academic site, you can adding ".edu" to your search terms will bring up sites published by colleges and universities. Of course, you may end up with a course syllabus or student work. Google is so large that you can enter several terms and still get millions of hits. Other more selective and academically-oriented search engines include: Infomine and ipl2.

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