Events
  • In conjunction with the current exhibition Patterns Bigger Than Any of Us: Jesse Fleming / Pat O'Neill in Ben Maltz Gallery, May 7 - August 12, 2017.

    In Conversation: Jesse Fleming and Pat O'Neill, moderated by LA-based idependent curator and historian Ciara Moloney

     

    Jesse Fleming (b. 1977) is part of an emerging group of artists and technologists that examine the convergence of media art and mindfulness. Recent solo exhibitions were held at Five Car Garage; 356 Mission; and Night Gallery, all in Los Angeles, CA; and the University of Texas in Austin, TX.

    Pat O’Neill’s (b. 1939) artistic and filmmaking career spans over 50 years, and he is highly-regarded for his experiments with film and optical printing. Recent solo exhibitions were held at Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive in Berkeley, CA; Monitor in Rome, Italy; VeneKlasen/Werner in Berlin, Germany; Quinta do Quetzal in Vidigueira, Portugal; Mitchell-Innes & Nash in New York, NY; and Cherry and Martin in Los Angeles, CA.

    Ciara Moloney is an independent curator, editor, and writer based in Los Angeles. She was formerly Curator of Exhibitions and Projects at Modern Art Oxford where she curated exhibitions by Barbara Kruger, Josh Kline, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Christian Boltanski and Kiki Kogelnik.

  • Amelia Gray is the author of the short story collections AM/PM, Museum of the Weird, and Gutshot, as well as the novels Threats and, most recently, Isadora, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Tin House, and VICE. She is winner of the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, of FC2's Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. 

  • Luis J. Rodriguez was Los Angeles Poet Laureate from 2014-2016. The twenty-fifth edition of his first book, Poems Across the Pavement, won a 2015 Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement. He has written fourteen other books of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and nonfiction, including the best-selling memoir Always Running: La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A. Rodriguez is also founding editor of Tia Chucha Press and co-founder of Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural & Bookstore in the San Fernando Valley. In 2016 Tia Chucha Press produced the largest anthology of L.A.-area poets, Coiled Serpent: Poets Arising from the Cultural Quakes & Shifts of Los Angeles. Rodriguez’s last memoir It Calls You Back: An Odyssey Through Love, Addiction, Revolutions, and Healing was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award. His latest poetry collection Borrowed Bones appeared in 2016 from Curbstone Books/Northwestern University Press.

  • Raised in Philadelphia, with roots in South Africa and Trinidad, Zinzi Clemmons’ writing has appeared in Zoetrope: All-Story, Transition, The Paris Review Daily, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships and support from the MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the Kimbilio Center for African American Fiction. She is co-founder and former Publisher of Apogee Journal, and a Contributing Editor to LitHub. She teaches literature and creative writing at the Colburn Conservatory and Occidental College. Her debut novel, What We Lose, as well as a second title, are forthcoming from Viking.

  • Louise Sandhaus is a graphic designer and graphic design educator. She was previously Director of the Graphic Design Program at CalArts where she currently is faculty. Her recent book on California graphic design, Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires and Riots: California and Graphic Design 1936-1986, co-published by Metropolis Books and Thames & Hudson, has received laudatory reviews from The New York Times, The Guardian, Eye, and Creative Review. The book received the Palm d’Argent for best art book at FILAF (International Festival of Art Books and Films on Art).

  • Photo Credit: Jesse Pniak

     

    F. Douglas Brown received the 2013 Cave Canem Poetry Prize (selected by Tracy K. Smith) for Zero to Three, published by the University of Georgia. He also co-authored the chapbook Begotten with Geffrey Davis as part of Upper Rubber Boot Book's Floodgate Poetry Series. Both a past Cave Canem and Kundiman Fellow, his poems have appeared in the Academy of American Poets, The Virginia Quarterly, Bat City Review, The Chicago Quarterly Review, The Southern Humanities Review, The Sugar House Review, Cura Magazine, and Muzzle Magazine. He is co-founder and curator of un::fade::able - The Requiem for Sandra Bland, a quarterly reading series examining restorative justice through poetry as a means to address racism. Brown currently teaches English at Loyola High School in Los Angeles.

  • Emily Raboteau’s nonfiction work Searching for Zion was named a best book of 2013 by the Huffington Post and the San Francisco Chronicle, and was a finalist for the Hurston Wright Legacy Award, grand prize winner of the New York Book Festival, and a winner of a 2014 American Book Award. She is the author of a novel, The Professor’s Daughter, and her fiction and essays have been published and anthologized in Best American Short Stories, the New York Times, The New Yorker, Tin House, Buzzfeed, LitHub, The Guardian, Guernica, Virginia Quarterly, The Believer, and Salon. Other honors include a Pushcart Prize, the Chicago Tribune’s Nelson Algren Award, and fellowships from the NEA, the Lannan Foundation, and the MacDowell Colony. Raboteau teaches creative writing at City College in New York.

O-Tube

Capstone Research and Citing

Research

Research means finding the  best kind of information for the problem that you want to solve. At the senior level (or in any field where time and money matter) you need to find specific information and that usually means going beyond .com websites.

Popular general websites like Wikipedia give you basic information; it is not always bad information, but it has limitations. The better sources for your capstone paper topic will be found in databases which include journals and articles specific to your issue and books (ditto). You can also get good information from experts in the field so don't overlook interviewing but remember that material from interviews usually has to be put into context or supports and that means....RESEARCH.

To find good sources, you need to learn how to be specific. That can mean using a keyword or phrase like a person's name or a title or specific term. That may lead you to an article or a book that you will need to read and decide how helpful it can be. The library databases include articles, sites, books that are full text and free to you (because the library pays for them).  You may already be familiar with journals or other publications that are germane to your field. Don't overlook government sites (.gov) or educations sites (.edu) for good information.

Be realistic...the more complex your questions and issues, the more you need to read and think and evaluate. Facts are fairly easy to find--they are often in encyclopedias like Britannica but you can't make a strong argument on facts alone. You are going to be asked to explain and interpret and for that you will be using other people's ideas. You may find your position changing as you research; that is the nature of learning.

Finally, don't forget that you can always ask your instructor or the librarian about sources.

Annotated Bibliography

For this paper, you won't be able to do a good job without searching through at least 2-3 appropriate databases. Here is good places to begin: Library Databases.

Then create an annotated bibliography of at least 4-5 resources, some of which by necessity will be found through the Otis databases, including the OPAC, and include journal articles and/or books. You must annotate and evaluate the sources including the identifying the credentials of the author and the type of information (scholarly, popular, etc.) and intended autience. (See CRAAP Detection and Types of Information)

Sample Annotations

See more: Annotating Sources (The Otis Way)

Jagodzinski, Jan. Youth Fantasies: The Perverse Landscape of the Media. Gordonsville, VA: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. ebrary. Web. 29 July 2013.

[Author Credentials]  Jan Jagodzinski is a professor in the department of Secondary Education at the University of Alberta with a Ph.D in education and a scholarly focus on teenagers and popular culture influences. He has written lots of articles on these subjects that have been published in peer-edited journals; this is his second book on the subject. [Audience/Type of Information] The information is a decade old so some of his examples are a little outdated. The book has a bibliography of 85 sources, is heavily footnoted and many of the footnotes are annotated. There are many images including photographs and screen shots from television shows and several graphs and charts. This is a scholarly source that targets an academic audience, especially undergraduate and graduate students. Palgrave Macmillan publishes globally but concentrates on the humanities and social sciences. [How Work Illuminates your Topic] In this book, the author attempts to examine youth culture. Rather than simply attempting to determine the effects of activities teens become involved with, he examines why they become interested in them in the first place, and attempts to rethink the lines of what the realities of teenagers are and what our fantasies of them are.

Bosacki, Sandra, et al. "Preadolescents' Self-Concept and Popular Magazine Preferences." Journal of Research in Childhood Education 23.3 (2009): 340-50. ProQuest. Web. 29 July 2013.

[Author Credentials] Dr. Sandra Bosacki is the Associate Professor (PhD) in the Department of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies in Education at Brock University in Canada. [Audience/Type of Information] The journal is the official publication of the Official Journal of the Association for Childhood Education International. It’s scholarly. [How Work Illuminates your Topic] This article draws on a larger study of Canadian children's sense of self and media habits. The analysis shows a great diversity in preadolescents' magazine reading habits and self-descriptions. Results showed that across all ages, girls preferred mainly fashion and entertainment magazines, whereas boys preferred mainly magazines concerning sports and video games. This is good information for my paper because it analyzes the interests of children by gender.

Wolfgang, Ben. "Police to Use Social Media as Way to Head Off Flash Mobs." The Washington Times, August 18, 2011, A1.

[Author Credentials] Ben Wolfgang is a national reporter for The Washington Times. Before coming to the Times, he spent four years as a political reporter in Pennsylvania. His focus is on education and science policy. [Audience/Type of Information] This article is in a newspaper and can be considered directed at a popular audience. The article is fairly short and primarily just reporting without a lot of analysis. [How Work Illuminates your Topic] I am interested in how social media is used by youth, but this is a case where police seem to using the media against the organizers. The article is clearly biased toward considering flash mobs a crime that is organized quickly by youth on social media. The youth are referred to as “troublemakers.”

Citations

Students are often confused about what to cite, when to cite, how to cite.  In a world with so much information available, it is important to acknowledge the original ideas and the exact words of your sources. Citing is like leaving a trail for the reader to know exactly where you got any information that was not your original idea. This includes images as well unless they are your original work. It means that it you paraphrase original ideas or texts, you still need to cite the source. Paraphrasing is a good idea most of the time because it means that what you are writing keeps the same syle and voice and you get the information across...much better than long quotations. Proper citations in MLA style and a Works Cited page must accompany all papers.

By the senior level you should know when and how to cite but...it you are still not sure, there are very good educational sites listed at Citing Sources.

Plagiarism

Check yourself by putting your paper through Grammarly (Otis has an account. Use your Otis email). Plagiarism occurs when a person deliberately uses another person’s concepts, language, images, music, or other original (not common knowledge) material without acknowledging the source and/or making substantial modifications. While referencing or appropriating may be part of a studio or Liberal Arts and Sciences assignment, it is the student’s ethical responsibility to acknowledge and/or modify the original material.

See also: Otis Plagiarism Policy

Specific examples of plagiarism include:

  • Submitting someone else’s work in whole or part (including copying directly from a source
  • Having someone else produce, revise, or substantially alter all or part of a written paper or studio assignment.
  • Cutting and pasting any textual or image-based work from the internet without proper documentation or clarification of sources.
  • Failure to cite sources.