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Events
  • Nancy Lupo

    Apr 21| Lectures
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    Nancy Lupo is a Los Angeles based artist who has attended Flagstaff Arts and Leadership Academy, Pratt Institute, Cooper Union School for the Advancement of Science and Art, and École Nationale Superiérieur des Beaux-Arts in Paris, France. 

     

    Learn more about the artist here.

  • LA/LA: Place and Practice is a two-day symposium organized by Scripps College, the Getty Foundation, the Getty Research Institute, and The San Diego Museum of Art in conjunction with Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA an initiative led by the Getty. Supported by a grant from the Getty Foundation, this two-day event will be held at The San Diego Museum of Art on Saturday, May 2, 2015 and at the Getty Center on Monday, May 4, 2015. RSVP here.

  • 33rd Annual Scholarship Benefit and Fashion Show

    Saturday, May 2, 2015
    6:30pm
    The Beverly Hilton
    Cocktails, Dinner, and Runway Fashion Show

  • LA/LA: Place and Practice is a two-day symposium organized by Scripps College, the Getty Foundation, the Getty Research Institute, and The San Diego Museum of Art in conjunction with Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA an initiative led by the Getty. Supported by a grant from the Getty Foundation, this two-day event will be held at The San Diego Museum of Art on Saturday, May 2, 2015 and at the Getty Center on Monday, May 4, 2015. RSVP here.

  • On the Roof

    May 05| Exhibition
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    Graduate Fine Arts Final Exhibition featuring work by

    Soo Yun Jun 
    Delia Perez Salinas Tijerina 
    Yasmin Than
    Sean Cully
    Rachel Indergaard 
    Kristy Baltezore 
    Angie Kim 

  • View work by the next generation of creative professionals in

    Architecture/Landscape/Interiors
    Communication Arts: Advertising Design, Graphic Design, Illustration
    Digital Media: Animation, Game & Entertainment Design, Motion Design
    Fashion Design: Costume Design
    Fine Arts: Painting, Photography, Sculpture/New Genres
    Product Design
    Toy Design

    Graduate Fine Arts

  • View work by the next generation of creative professionals in

    Architecture/Landscape/Interiors
    Communication Arts: Advertising Design, Graphic Design, Illustration
    Digital Media: Animation, Game & Entertainment Design, Motion Design
    Fashion Design: Costume Design
    Fine Arts: Painting, Photography, Sculpture/New Genres
    Product Design
    Toy Design

    Graduate Fine Arts

O-Tube

Boolean Logic for Better Searching

"Computers are useless. They can only give you answers." --Pablo Picasso

Computers can be very effective tools to locate information, but they are ONLY machines. Computer output depends upon human input.

Computerized search mechanisms are based on Boolean logic. When you use the enter code words known as boolean operators you are telling the computer exactly how to perform a search which will be tailored to your specific needs.

The most commonly used code words are: AND, OR, and NOT. The phrase you enter into a search box is called the search string (or syntax)

Here are some diagrams to help explain the effects of these operators.

 

AND
This operator combines the individual words (terms) in order to create a more specific search.

It actually NARROWS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

cats AND dogs

Some search engines use a plus (+) sign instead of the word AND.

+Cats +dogs 

boolean AND diagram

 

 

OR
This operator combines possible synonyms of the individual words in order to create a wider search.

It actually BROADENS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

films OR movies OR motion pictures

 

boolean OR diagram

 

 

 

NOT 
This operator limits (reduces) your search results by excluding specific terms.

It actually NARROWS, in a very specific way, your search.

Possible search string (syntax):

dolphins NOT football

Some search engines use the minus sign (-) instead of the word NOT.

+Dolphins -football

boolean NOT diagram

Different search engines incorporate Boolean logic in different ways, but they all use it. Some assume AND, some OR. It is important to read the instructions for each search engine before entering your search terms. Info People publishes a nice search engine comparison guide which shows the differences in Boolean syntax used in the different engines: http://infopeople.org/search/chart.html

The use of quotation marks or parenthesis around phrases is a handy device to cause the computer to search for the exact phrase. For instance:

  • "American Beauty"
  • "computer graphics artist"
  • (motion pictures)