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  • Lucy Orta (b. Sutton Coldfield, UK, 1966) and Jorge Orta (b. Rosario, Argentina, 1953) founded Studio Orta in 1991. Lucy + Jorge Orta’s collaborative practice focuses on the social and ecological factors of environmental sustainability to realise major bodies of work employing drawing, sculpture, installation, object making, couture, painting and silkscreen printing, as well staging workshops, ephemeral interventions and performances.

  • Otis Community Banquet

    Oct 22| Special Event
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    In conjunction with the exhibition Food - Water - Life / Lucy + Jorge Orta
    Wednesday, October 22 | Bobrow Green
    11:30am – 12:30pm: Banquet for participating classes
    12:30 – 1:15pm: Open to Otis Community to view class projects created for Banquet, and sample soup and fruit-infused water

  • Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artists Lucy + Jorge Orta.

    Thursday, October 23rd, 10am

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

  • Artists Lucy + Jorge Orta in conversation with the curators Ginger Gregg Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox of the traveling exhibition Food - Water - Life / Lucy + Jorge Orta. The conversation is followed by a reception. Food - Water - Life / Lucy + Jorge Orta is on view in the Ben Maltz Gallery through December 6, 2014.

  • JP Munro

    Oct 28| Lectures
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    Born 1975, Inglewood, CA. Lives and works in Los Angeles, CA.

    chinaartobjects.com/artists/jp-munro/

  • Minor Declaration

    Oct 29| Student Event
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    Highly Recommended for Sophomores

  • Rob Spillman

    Oct 29| Lectures
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    Rob Spillman is Editor and co-founder of Tin House, which has been honored in Best American Stories, Best American Essays, Best American Poetry, O’Henry Prize Stories, the Pushcart Prize Anthology and numerous other anthologies. He is also Executive Editor of Tin House Books and co-founder of the Tin House Literary Festival. His writing has appeared in BookForum, the Boston Review, Connoisseur, Details, GQ, Nerve, the New York Times Book Review, Rolling Stone, Salon, Spin, Sports Illustrated, Time, Vanity Fair, Vogue, and elsewhere.

O-Tube

Boolean Logic for Better Searching

"Computers are useless. They can only give you answers." --Pablo Picasso

Computers can be very effective tools to locate information, but they are ONLY machines. Computer output depends upon human input.

Computerized search mechanisms are based on Boolean logic. When you use the enter code words known as boolean operators you are telling the computer exactly how to perform a search which will be tailored to your specific needs.

The most commonly used code words are: AND, OR, and NOT. The phrase you enter into a search box is called the search string (or syntax)

Here are some diagrams to help explain the effects of these operators.

 

AND
This operator combines the individual words (terms) in order to create a more specific search.

It actually NARROWS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

cats AND dogs

Some search engines use a plus (+) sign instead of the word AND.

+Cats +dogs 

boolean AND diagram

 

 

OR
This operator combines possible synonyms of the individual words in order to create a wider search.

It actually BROADENS your search.

Possible search strings (or syntax):

films OR movies OR motion pictures

 

boolean OR diagram

 

 

 

NOT 
This operator limits (reduces) your search results by excluding specific terms.

It actually NARROWS, in a very specific way, your search.

Possible search string (syntax):

dolphins NOT football

Some search engines use the minus sign (-) instead of the word NOT.

+Dolphins -football

boolean NOT diagram

Different search engines incorporate Boolean logic in different ways, but they all use it. Some assume AND, some OR. It is important to read the instructions for each search engine before entering your search terms. Info People publishes a nice search engine comparison guide which shows the differences in Boolean syntax used in the different engines: http://infopeople.org/search/chart.html

The use of quotation marks or parenthesis around phrases is a handy device to cause the computer to search for the exact phrase. For instance:

  • "American Beauty"
  • "computer graphics artist"
  • (motion pictures)