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  • Visit the Campus. Get advice on your portfolio. Talk to faculty and students. Learn more about financial aid.

     

    Register now for Open House 2014.

     

    CHECK-IN BEGINS AT 12:30
    WORKSHOPS 

    1:00 – 1:45
    Financing Your Education
    Center for Creative Professions: Create Your Future 

    2:00 – 2:45
    Housing Options: Making a Good Fit

  • Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week 4-6pm is Waves to Asia with DJ Pheonix, DJ Z and DJ Kai, bringing some Asian culture to the air waves, including J-Pop, K-Pop and Chinese Pop, as well as popular anime music. Also as part of the show we will feature a talk about Asian food that you can get and try in Los Angeles.

     

  • Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

    This week 4-5pm is Rewind 1976 with DJ’s Gabriel Rojas, Nauseous P, and Little C. Join us to count down the songs on the top of the charts... 1976 style. We'll be playing the hits as if it's that very Autumn day 30+ years ago.

  • Otis Radio: Rap Realm

    Nov 10| Special Event
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    Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

  • Scott Short

    Nov 11| Lectures
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    Scott Short | Born 1964 in Marion, OH | Lives and works in Paris, France 

     

  • Cathy Park Hong's poetry collections include Translating Mo'um and Dance Dance Revolution, which was chosen for the Barnard Women Poets Prize. Norton published her third book of poems, Engine Empire, in 2012. A former Fullbright Fellow, Hong is also the recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the New York Foundation for the Arts. Her poems have been appeared in A Public Space, Poetry, Paris Review, Conjunctions, McSweeney's, APR, Harvard Review, Boston Review, The Nation, and other journals.

  • Monica Majoli

    Nov 13| Lectures
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    Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artist, Monica Majoli.

    Thursday, November 13th 11:115am - 12:30pm

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

O-Tube

Advertising Program: Research Tutorial

Step 1: Do you have basic research skills?

To learn the basics of library research, review the Info Lit Tutorials.

Step 2: Clarify Your Topic

Your instructor may give you topics such as:

  • Top Advertising Agencies in Los Angeles
  • Marketing on a Low Budget
  • Trend Spotting
  • Guerilla Marketing
  • Targeting Your Audience
  • Appealing to Emotions in Marketing and Advertising
  • Media Planning
  • Award Winning Advertising Campaigns

These are actually all fairly broad subjects encompassing many smaller topics. Before you can do systematic research, you must first clarify your exact topic. A good place to start is by generating synonyms for that topic.

Why is this important?

Take, for instance the term "guerilla marketing." Just because that term may be well understood within the advertising world, it is not true that it will always used every time someone writes or publishes something that could be considered guerilla marketing. Plus, it may involve many types of marketing. When you do a "keyword" search on "guerilla marketing," only those documents containing those exact terms be found. It's entirely possible that you could miss an excellent book on "product placement" such as: Product Placement in Hollywood films : A History. (See also: How to Clarify Your Topic)

Presumably you are researching topics that are not entirely familiar to you and you may not know the definitions and be able to create a list of synonyms. In this case, you may want to briefly browse some recommended websites. Keep a pencil and paper handy to jot down terms which you can use in your research process.

NOTE: Here's a good tutorial which explains about Researching Companies Online

Step 3: Find Books

Students often rely too much on Google or Yahoo and neglect better tools and sources. To be a competent researcher, figure out for yourself a systematic methodology and become proficient with a variety of tools.
Definitely try the Library Catalog (OPAC). Try a variety of keyword from your synonyms list to get an overview of what books are in the Otis Library. Through the OPAC, you may also discover alternate terms that you can use in searching other places.

Some of results you will find will be to e-books which are available to the Otis Community online. Within the OPAC, you'll see a link and all you need to do is click it to bring up the Ebrary database. You may also go directly to Ebrary, to search 80,000 full-text electronic books. This database contains an enormous amount information. It is geared towards college students.

Step 4: Find Articles in Magazines and Journals

Find a journal article or two. Start with EBSCO Omni. It contains the full-text for 3,100 magazines and journals covering a wide variety of subject areas, including advertising. One of the magazines included in Adweek. Try a keyword search with some of your terms. If you get too many hits, limit it to a subject search.

Step 5: Look in Newspapers

Find a newspaper article or two. Try eLibrary. These databases have full text of thousands of newspapers, plus transcripts of TV news programs and congressional testimony. You'll definitely have to limit your search in some way. Think about an additional term or two to enter as a means of limiting the number of hits returned. The name of a company or a specific type of product would be a specific additional term. As a general rule, the larger the database, the more terms you can enter. (Click here to learn about Boolean Logic and how it works to refine a search.)

Step 6: Try the Web

As a last step, search for content-rich academic/educational websites. Searching the web can be overwhelming. Too much information may, in fact, be more trouble than not enough. If you want to refine your skill or you are having trouble, go to the Library and talk with Sue Maberry, the Librarian. Finding information is her expertise.

Pages ending in .org or .edu may be the best ones, but make sure the author is not a student doing a class assignment or that the page is not simply a course syllabus.