Events
  • Viet Thanh Nguyen’s bestselling novel The Sympathizer won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, the First Novel Prize from the Center for Fiction, and a Carnegie Medal from the American Library Association. It was also a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. Nguyen is also the author of Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America and Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War.

  • Tonya Foster

    Sep 21| Lectures
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    Poet Tonya Foster is the author of the collection A Swarm of Bees in High Court. Her work has appeared in nocturnes, Callaloo, Traffic, Gulf Coast, and other journals. Her essays have appeared in NY Arts Magazine, NYFA Quarterly and The Poetry Project Newsletter. A co-editor of Third Mind: Teaching Creative Writing Through Visual Art, Foster teaches at California College of the Arts and lives in the Bay Area.

  • Opening Reception

    Sep 24| Special Event
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    New York-based artist Polly Apfelbaum’s work has situated itself as a hybrid of painting, sculpture, and installation over a career spanning 30 plus years. Exploring the intricacies of color, Apfelbaum weaves her way, both literally and conceptually, through ideas of Minimalism, Pop aesthetics, and Color Field painting to blur the lines between two and three dimensional art making.

  • Artist Polly Apfelbaum in conversation with Connie Butler, within Apfelbaum's exhibition Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

     

  • John Keene

    Oct 05| Lectures
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    John Keene is the author of the novels Annotations and Counternarratives, as well as several other works, including the poetry collection Seismosis, with artist Christopher Stackhouse, and a translation of Brazilian author Hilda Hilst's novel Letters from a Seducer. The recipient of a Whiting Award, Keene has been a member of the Dark Room Writers Collective and a Cave Canem fellow. He has served as the managing editor of Callaloo and taught at Northwestern. He currently teaches at Rutgers University-Newark and lives in New York.

  • Artist Polly Apfelbaum in conversation with David Pagel, within Apfelbaum's exhibition Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

     

  • Renee Gladman

    Oct 19| Lectures
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    Renee Gladman is the author of eight books of prose and poetry, including the Ravicka triology, published by Dorothy (Event Factory, The Ravickians, and Ana Patova Crosses a Bridge). Other titles include Arlem, Not Right Now, Juice The Activist, A Picture Feeling, and Newcomer Can't Swim. Since 2004, she has been the publisher of Leon Works, a perfect bound series of books of experimental prose, and also has edited the Leroy chapbook series.

O-Tube

Advertising Program: Research Tutorial

Step 1: Do you have basic research skills?

To learn the basics of library research, review the Info Lit Tutorials.

Step 2: Clarify Your Topic

Your instructor may give you topics such as:

  • Top Advertising Agencies in Los Angeles
  • Marketing on a Low Budget
  • Trend Spotting
  • Guerilla Marketing
  • Targeting Your Audience
  • Appealing to Emotions in Marketing and Advertising
  • Media Planning
  • Award Winning Advertising Campaigns

These are actually all fairly broad subjects encompassing many smaller topics. Before you can do systematic research, you must first clarify your exact topic. A good place to start is by generating synonyms for that topic.

Why is this important?

Take, for instance the term "guerilla marketing." Just because that term may be well understood within the advertising world, it is not true that it will always used every time someone writes or publishes something that could be considered guerilla marketing. Plus, it may involve many types of marketing. When you do a "keyword" search on "guerilla marketing," only those documents containing those exact terms be found. It's entirely possible that you could miss an excellent book on "product placement" such as: Product Placement in Hollywood films : A History. (See also: How to Clarify Your Topic)

Presumably you are researching topics that are not entirely familiar to you and you may not know the definitions and be able to create a list of synonyms. In this case, you may want to briefly browse some recommended websites. Keep a pencil and paper handy to jot down terms which you can use in your research process.

NOTE: Here's a good tutorial which explains about Researching Companies Online

Step 3: Find Books

Students often rely too much on Google or Yahoo and neglect better tools and sources. To be a competent researcher, figure out for yourself a systematic methodology and become proficient with a variety of tools.
Definitely try the Library Catalog (OPAC). Try a variety of keyword from your synonyms list to get an overview of what books are in the Otis Library. Through the OPAC, you may also discover alternate terms that you can use in searching other places.

Some of results you will find will be to e-books which are available to the Otis Community online. Within the OPAC, you'll see a link and all you need to do is click it to bring up the ebrary database. You may also go directly to Ebrary, to search 80,000 full-text electronic books. This database contains an enormous amount information. It is geared towards college students.

Step 4: Find Articles in Magazines and Journals

Find a journal article or two. Start with EBSCO OmniFile. It contains the full-text for 3,100 magazines and journals covering a wide variety of subject areas, including advertising. One of the magazines included in Adweek. Try a keyword search with some of your terms. If you get too many hits, limit it to a subject search.

Step 5: Look in Newspapers

Find a newspaper article or two. Try eLibrary. These databases have full text of thousands of newspapers, plus transcripts of TV news programs and congressional testimony. You'll definitely have to limit your search in some way. Think about an additional term or two to enter as a means of limiting the number of hits returned. The name of a company or a specific type of product would be a specific additional term. As a general rule, the larger the database, the more terms you can enter. (Click here to learn about Boolean Logic and how it works to refine a search.)

Step 6: Try the Web

As a last step, search for content-rich academic/educational websites. Searching the web can be overwhelming. Too much information may, in fact, be more trouble than not enough. If you want to refine your skill or you are having trouble, go to the Library and talk with Sue Maberry, the Librarian. Finding information is her expertise.

Pages ending in .org or .edu may be the best ones, but make sure the author is not a student doing a class assignment or that the page is not simply a course syllabus.