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  • Angie Bray: Shhhh

    Jan 17| Exhibition
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    Angie Bray: Shhhh

    January 17 – March 22, 2015

    Opening Reception: January 24, 4-6pm

    Angie Bray: Shhhh is a substantial exhibition of the Los Angeles–based artist’s installations, photographs, drawings, sculpture and video organized by guest curator Meg Linton for the Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis College of Art and Design. The exhibition opens on Saturday, January 17, 2015.

    About the Exhibition

  • Opening Reception for Angie Bray: Shhhh a substantial exhibition of the Los Angeles–based artist’s installations, photographs, drawings, sculpture and video organized by guest curator Meg Linton for the Ben Maltz Gallery.

  • Walk-thru the exhibition Shhhh led by the artist Angie Bray. Gain insight into Bray's work and to the exhibition, and hear about her process, materials, and philosophies on art-making and on quieting, listening, and looking.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture REDUX.3 by JAMES CORNER


    Wednesday    18 February 2015    7:30 PM
    Ahmanson Auditorium   limited, open seating starting at 7:00 PM  

    at THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES

    250 SOUTH GRAND AVENUE  LOS ANGELES CA  90012

     

    This lecture is free and open to the public.

     

  • Bassoon Performance

    Feb 22| Special Event
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    Bassoonist John Steinmetz Performs and Converses with the Audience
    Playing live bassoon inside the exhibition Angie Bray: Shhhh, Steinmetz will react to Bray’s installations by playing some of his own music as well as new compositions, and will converse with the audience, who are encouraged to sit or roam through the gallery looking and listening.

  • Composer Kubilay Üner offers a “reactive” experience with a live presentation of a new composition made in response to the exhibition Angie Bray: Shhhh. The performance will be interspersed with conversation between Üner and Bray.

  • Closing reception for exhibition Angie Bray: Shhhh

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