Events
  • Joint Venture

    Dec 10| Exhibition
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    Joint Venture is a group exhibition of collaborative projects by artists from ECF’s Inglewood Art Center and students from Otis College's Creative Action class, Uniquely Abled, taught by Michele Jaquis and mentored by Marlena Donohue.

     

    December 8, 2016 - January 6, 2017

    Gallery Hours M - F 11am - 3:30pm

     

  • LA Portfolio Day

    Jan 15| Special Event
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    Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to host the Los Angeles Portfolio Day on January 15, 2017 from 12-4pm!

    Bring your portfolio for an informal review by representatives from art and design schools, and learn about their programs of study. Portfolio Day events are held across the country, high school students, parents, teachers, guidance counselors and college transfer students are encouraged to attend.

  • James Hannaham

    Jan 25| Lectures
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    James Hannaham is the author of the novels Delicious Foods, which won the 2016 PEN/Faulkner Award, and God Says No, a Stonewall Honor Book and a Lambda Literary Award finalist.

  • Tuning the Room

    Jan 28| Exhibition
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    Anna Craycroft: Tuning the Room

    January 28 - April 16, 2017

    Ben Maltz Gallery

  • Opening Reception

    Jan 28| Special Event
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    In acoustical engineering, “tuning the room” is a technique for measuring the specific sound properties of an enclosed space and then adapting the environment to improve its acoustic reflections. New York-based artist Anna Craycroft applies this technique both literally and metaphorically to the Ben Maltz Gallery for her exhibition Tuning the Room. Craycroft’s exhibition asks that we consider how the specific characteristics of an environment shape our experience within it, and how we become attuned in return.

  • Robin Coste Lewis won the National Book Award for Voyage of the Sable Venus. Her writing has appeared in The Massachusetts Review, Callaloo, The Harvard Gay & Lesbian Review, Transition: Women in Literary Arts, VIDA, Phantom Limb, and Lambda Literary Review. She has taught at Wheaton, Hunter, Hampshire, and the NYU Low-Residency MFA in Paris. Lewis is a fellow of Cave Canem and of the Los Angeles Institute for the Humanities, as well as a Provost’s Fellow in Poetry and Visual Studies at USC.

  • Solmaz Sharif

    Mar 01| Lectures
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    Solmaz Sharif’s first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press and is a 2016 National Book Award finalist. Her poetry has appeared in the New Republic, Granta, Poetry, and other journals. Her first collection, Look, was recently published by Graywolf Press. A former Stegner Fellow, she is currently a lecturer at Stanford University and lives in the Bay Area.

O-Tube

About Web Search Engines

Using Search Engines

There is no central index or catalog to the Internet. There are many search engines you can use to find the free information on the World Wide Web.

Parts of a Search Engine

  1. Spider (or Crawler). This is software which visits pages on the Web, reading page titles, body copy and other elements. It learns about new pages by following links. A database with copies of every web page visited by the spider is created at the search engine site.
  2. Index. Like a giant book of all the words in the database with pointers to the web pages that contain those words.
  3. Searching Software. This is software that sifts through the millions of pages recorded in the index to find matches to a search. It ranks them in order of relevancy, based on a formula or algorithm.
  4. Directory. Most search engines now also have directories, a hierarchical menu of sites created by people rather than software.

Although search engines have the basic parts described above, there are differences in how these parts are tuned. That is why the same search on different search engines often produces different results.

Tips for Effective Searching:

The trick for getting what you want from a search engine is to give the search engine as much detail as you can about the topic. Instead of typing a single word into the engine, type a phrase or series of words which are specific to the topic. For instance, to find out more about searching for information on the Internet, enter "searching the Internet" instead of "search." There are many ways to control your search. You will increase your search effectiveness by practicing using only one or two search engines until you have learned all the features and the type of information found through it. Information on features of each search engine can be found in the "help" or "search tips" sections.

Special Search Features (Syntax):

  • Phrase searching. Often putting the words of a phrase in quotes will cause the engine to look only for those words together:
    "chocolate cake"
  • You can often use Boolean operators to refine your search.
    • Plus sign. If you by putting a + in front of each word that you want to require the engine to find in a document:
      +recipe +chocolate +frosting will return chocolate frosting recipes
    • Minus sign. Put a - in front of words which must not be found in any listed documents:
      +chocolate -nuts will return documents about chocolate, but not nuts
    • Asterisk. If a word can have many endings, put an * to represent those possibilities:
      photo* will find photograph, photos, photography, photographic, etc.

Besides the Help screens of individual Web Search Tools, try this site: Search Engine Watch


 

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