Events
  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 4:00 - 5:00 pm is Welcome to the Haunted Boulevard. Join DJ Platinum (Grace Potter) and DJ Batsy (Jessi Hita) for a journey of the folklores, urban legends, and paranormal encounters from different cultures. 

     

    Listen online at KLMU.

  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

  • Mexican artist Yoshua Okón’s videos blur the lines between documentary, reality, and fiction. He collaborates closely with his actors (often amateurs who are also the subjects of the work) to create sociological examinations that ask viewers to contemplate uncomfortable situations and circumstances.
  • Dana Johnson is the author of the short story collection In the Not Quite Dark. She is also the author of Break Any Woman Down, winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, and the novel Elsewhere, California.

  • Gallery 169 will be hosting the Otis College of Art and Design Communication Arts Graphic Design Junior Show, "5328," displaying a selection of work made over the five thousand twenty eight hours that make up the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Work will include collected posters, publications, and typographic projects.
  • Clay, Body is a solo exhibition from artist Sydney Aubert: Unapologetically fat, crass, and sexual, a ceramics artist who also works in video, and whatever other materials arouse her in the moment. Exhibition will be on view from Monday, April 24 - Friday, April 28 at the Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design. On view by appointment only, please contact the artist at sydney.aubert@gmail.com Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6pm-9pm Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design

  • Audrey Wollen is a feminist theorist and visual artist based in Los Angeles. Wollen uses social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, as platforms for her work on Sad Girl Theory, a theory which posits that internalized female sadness can be used as a radical and political action, separate from masculinized forms of protests such as anger and violence. She introduces this form of protest as an alternative to masculinized anger and violence.

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About Call Numbers

Classification Systems and Call Numbers

The purpose of a library classification system is to bring related material together in way that will help users locate items of interest to them. Library classification systems organize material by broad subject area. Each item is assigned a call number, which is like an address on a street.

Library of Congress Classification System

LC is used by most academic libraries. It was developed in 1901 as a response to the fact that the Library of Congress collection had grown from several thousand volumes to over a million. They formulated the system based on an actual collection of books rather than a theoretical construct.

LC Outline
A General Works B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion C  Auxiliary Sciences of History
D  History (includes Travel) E  America F  United States. Canada. Latin America
G  Geography H  Social Sciences J  Political Science
K  Law L Education M Music
N  Fine Art P  Language & Literature Q Science
R  Medicine S  Agriculture T  Technology
U  Military Science V  Naval Science Z  Books and Bibliographies

For a more detailed description of the LC call numbers most heavily used in the Otis Library, see What the Call Numbers Mean.


Example of an LC Call Number for the following book:
Techno.Seduction: An Exhibition of Multimedia Installation Work by Forty Artists, by Robert Rindler 

N Books about art
6512.5 Specific topic, usually country, time period, or type of art
I56 Further breakdown of topic; in this case, installation art. Often this line is used for the artist or author number.
R56 In this case, this is the author number (Rindler)

 

Dewey Decimal System

The Dewey Classification is used by most public libraries. Melvil Dewey tried to create a system in which all knowledge was theoretically ordered in a logical way. That is, closely related subjects would be near each other. Unfortunately, many new subjects have come into existence since Dewey invented the DDC, causing some problems with this approach. For instance, there were no computers in his time. The only way to expand a Dewey number is through the addition of numbers after the decimal point. The result can be very long and complicated numbers for some subjects.

Dewey Outline
000 General Works 100 Philosophy
200 Religion 300 Social Sciences
400 Languages 500 Pure Science
600 Technology 700 The Arts
800 Literature 900 Geography and History


Example of a Dewey Call Number for the same book listed above:
Techno.Seduction: An Exhibition of Multimedia Installation Work by Forty Artists, by Robert Rindler 

709.73 Subject is art history. The .73 is the sub-category American art and artists.
RIN The first 3 letters of the author's last name (Rindler).


Other Things to Notice About Call Numbers

Look carefully at the call number. It is sometimes preceded on the top line by words such as:

  • Oversize
  • Ref.
  • Sp.Coll.

They designate separate areas within the library where books are located. A staff member will point you in the right direction or retrieve the materials for you. Please ask.

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