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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Online Summer Courses

Complete Online Learning:

A course offering in which 100% of instruction is delivered online rather than via face-to-face contact between students and instructor(s).

Why take a complete online learning course?

Online courses are convenient, can work around your schedule, allow for time and geographic flexibility, are self-paced, and a different educational experience.

What type of student does well in an online course?

Students who do well in online courses are able and willing to communicate effectively through written texts, are self-motivated and disciplined, have good time management skills, are independent learners, and have access to technology and some literacy in using it.

How can I succeed in an online course?

Set aside certain times to work on the course every week. 
Keep in mind that you are completing hours that normally would be spent in class and on homework.
Do not wait until the last minute to complete work.
Become comfortable with your computer and browser.
Ask your instructors questions if you are unsure or unclear.
Resist distractions—you will often be at home with phones, TVs, stereos, etc.
Read the assignments and instructions carefully.

What do I need to get started?
  • You will need your password and x-numbers before you leave Otis for the Summer. The Registration office will not give this to you over the phone. Only in person.
  • Check O-Space and Otis email weekly as this is the main form of contact.
  • Purchase your books online as soon as possible.

How do I register?

You will be notified when Registration begins. See the Academic Advisor, Marsha Hopkins, in the Liberal Arts and Sciences office (room 303) and she will fill out an advisement form. You will take that signed form to Registration.

What kind of programs will I need to use for an online course?

You will need to be able to use email (particularly attaching documents to your email), O-
Space, and Microsoft Office applications such as WORD or EXCEL or POWERPOINT (or MAC EQUIVALENT). Depending on your class, you may also need to use wikis and/or blogs and library databases. The Library website has a lot of helpful instructions on how to use this software and other technology.

How will I communicate with my instructor?

Initial communication will begin through O-Space and via Otis email. It will be required to use your Otis Student email

How will I know when things are due?

Your instructor will work with each class to determine how due dates and deadlines will be established through the course syllabus.

What if I don't check my Otis email?

Start to! Get in the practice of regularly checking your student email account. It will be required to use your Otis Student email. This will be the primary form of communication. 

How do I turn in homework?

Your instructor will work with each class to determine the process, however, most faculty 
prefer students to attach word documents to an email. Your instructor will notify you of receipt of the course work in a reply email. 

How much work will I have?

Each course will require 4 hours of work (equivalent to the time you would have otherwise spent in class) and 4-6 hours of homework each week.

How do I withdraw?

Contact Registration and Records for information on the process to withdraw from summer courses.

Who do I contact for help?

Your instructor should be your primary and first contact. 
However, additional technology support can be found in the library by contact Heather Cleary, Digital DB Metadata Librarian, by email hcleary@otis.edu

Instructors and courses: