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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


What is it?

The LAS capstone course offers you a unique opportunity to reflect on your education, artistic practices and/or interests. Through discussion and reflection, you will identify, articulate, research, write about, and discuss specific issues and concerns that you believe are the most critical in understanding and evaluating an engaging issue and its dynamic relationship to you
as an artist and designer.

The capstone is a blended class which means that about 30% of the course will be communicated online.  Some weeks you will meet as a class, some weeks you will meet individually with your instructor, and some weeks will you will work independently posting work online instead of going to class or having meetings.  You will work closely with your instructor discussing and reviewing all posted work to help you revise and be successful.


What will be expected of you?

You will be researching and writing a paper that is approximately 12-15 pages or 3750 words, post this paper, along with a cover letter, a bibliography, and an annotated bibliography on your eportfolio, and will present this work to your class.  You will have much support from your instructor, the library staff, the SRC, and your peers.


Why should you want to do this?

Your ability to critically think, to research, to utilize visual literacy, to analyze, to demonstrate mastery of a particular topic, to write in an articulate manner, and to skillfully present your work to an audience are all demonstrated through your capstone experience.  In other words, this class and what you produce “caps” or completes your Liberal Studies and Otis experience.


What can I do over the summer?

Write down a list of topics you are interested in researching.  You will be asked to bring this list with you the first day of class in the fall.  Should you wish to get a head-start on your semester, you should choose a topic, email a LAS instructor from the list below for commentary, work with that instructor to write and revise a thesis statement (perspective or argument for your paper), and do some research using the Otis Databases (linked through our library page).    There will be a pathfinder or link on the Otis library page available before summer break which will take you to an eportfolio which has some helpful advice and useful links.


Who can I contact?

The following are professors in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Dept.  Their specialties are listed although they all have other interests and expertise.  Feel free to email them this semester or over the summer with questions.


Parme Giuntini, Art History

Heather Joseph-Witham, Folklore and Mythology

Jeanne Willette, Art History and Critical Theory

David Bremer, Literature and Theology