Events
  • Lucas Blalock (b. 1978, Asheville, North Carolina, USA) lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. He earned a BA from Bard College (2002), attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (2011), and is an MFA candidate at UCLA (2013).

  • Daniel Mendel-Black has exhibited widely in the U.S. and abroad. Recent shows include Pretty Lips Are Red at China Art Objects Galleries in Los Angeles, and André Butzer, Marcel Hüppauff, Daniel Mendel-Black, Philipp Schwalb at Galerie Bernd Kugler in Innsbruck, Austria. Mendel-Black’s work is represented in a number of public collections.

  • Tim Walsh, is the inventor of the board game Blurt!, which sold more than a milion copies. Tim has lincesned toy and game concepts to Hasbro, Mattel, Brio, Educational Insights, Imagine Entertaiment, and others. Be inspired and entertained by the stories behind the creation of blockbuster toys and games.

     

  • Tim Davis's wry photographs find the sublime in the quotidian. Whether shooting an abandoned pair of sneakers, the streets of a nameless suburb, or the corner of a framed painting in a museum, Davis captures the peripheral, everyday beauty of our daily life.

  • James Hannaham

    Jan 25| Lectures
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    James Hannaham is the author of the novels Delicious Foods, which won the 2016 PEN/Faulkner Award, and God Says No, a Stonewall Honor Book and a Lambda Literary Award finalist.

  • Opening Reception and Acoustic Event: “Tuning the Room” lead by Gregory Lenczycki and Ken Goerres.

     

     



     

  • The measure and alterations of Craycroft’s “room tuning” are framed in relation to its setting within the art gallery of an art school. In the wake of the U.S. presidential election, and in anticipation of the exhibition runtime falling during the first months of the new administration, Tuning the Room is a proposal to pay attention to the role that art and art education play in how voices are heard.

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Joan Takayama-Ogawa: 2006 TLC Technology Grant Report


Report:

I received a Technology Grant to make enhanced podcasts for a paired class, Introduction to Visual Culture and English Developmental II. I worked in the TLC for 13 days 8 hours/day over the summer of 2006 and co-created a total of 11 enhanced podcasts, which are required listening for the English as a Second Language students enrolled in the paired class.

Enhanced podcasts allow for narration, visuals, music, and sound effects to be mixed in Apple’s program, GarageBand. The journey, in learning how to mix enhanced podcasts for ESL students enrolled in the paired Introduction to Visual Culture and English Developmental II class, was more important than the product produced. I learned skills that I can use in all of my classes.

  • How to create interesting power point slides.
  • How to use a Mac computer.
  • How to mix music, with narration and visuals.
  • How to organize computer files effectively.
  • How to delete computer files for better organization.
  • How computers can be networked to share information quickly and effectively in collaborative projects.

Speech writing and script writing skills were useful when writing the narration. Writing an essay is different than writing a script for an enhanced podcast. In particular, several suggestions come to mind:

  • HOOK: A motivating hook is necessary in the first sentence of the script.
  • RHETORICAL DEVICES: Use of rhetorical devices such as parallel structure, repetition, and contrapuntal turn around add dramatic effect to the script.
  • SENTENCE PATTERNS: Use short pithy sentences to make a point. Use long compound, complex sentences to develop an idea or set a relaxed mood.
  • PACE: A series of short sentences create a fast pace. A series of long sentences create lyrical, poetic verse.

Thinking of the voice as a musical instrument, starting in the diaphragm and ending outside of the mouth assists with enunciation and clarity in the recorded narration. A few suggestions:

  • UPTALK at the END of a SENTENCE: When reading aloud, we were taught to lower our voices to signal the end of a sentence. In broadcast journalism, the opposite is required. The speaker “up talks” at the end of the sentence, so the viewer can hear the end of the sentence. A good example is Tom Brokaw’s speech patterns as his deep baritone voice would be hard to understand if he lowered his voice at the end of a sentence.

--Joan Takayama-Ogawa
Liberal Arts and Sciences

Related: 2005-06 Faculty Development Grant

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