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Events
  • MFA Exhibition: Jamie Grace Davis

    Points of Departure

     

    1/28 Performaces

    1:00 - 1:10pm, 220V. 

    1:15 - 1:30pm,  ___________ships.

     

    1/31

    4 - 8:00pm, Closing Reception

     

  • Jason Bailer Losh lives and works in Los Angeles. He graduated with an MFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York. 
     
  • Ludovic Balland Typography Cabinet is a graphic design studio established in 2004 by Ludovic Balland. The studio focuses on book and editorial design, as well as new visual identities for international brands and cultural institutions.

     

    www.ludovic-balland.ch

    www.dar-news.com

  • Amy Adler

    Feb 03| Lectures
    More
    Amy Adler graduated from Cooper Union and received an MFA in Visual Art from UCLA and an MFA in Cinematic Arts from USC. She has had one person shows at the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and The Aspen Art Museum as well as galleries worldwide. 
     
  • Walk-thru the exhibition Shhhh led by the artist Angie Bray. Gain insight into Bray's work and to the exhibition, and hear about her process, materials, and philosophies on art-making and on quieting, listening, and looking.

  • Alex Israel

    Feb 10| Lectures
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    The work of Alex Israel is deeply entwined with his hometown of Los Angeles. The artist creates art that riffs on Hollywood culture and the cult of celebrity. His first major body of work consisted of rented studio props, transformed into readymades by their placement in the gallery—some blatantly obvious in their artificiality. He gave celebrities the same treatment in the video series “As It Lays”, video portraits based on campy TV talk shows.
  • Menno Cruijsen, Lava Design
    February 12, 12:30-1:30, Ahmanson 6th floor

    Lava was founded in 1990 by creative director Hans Wolbers (the Netherlands, 1965). The current team consists of 10 talented designers and three projectmanagers. The agency is focused on creative strategy, editorial design and dynamic identities.

    http://www.lava.nl

O-Tube

Joan Takayama-Ogawa: 2006 TLC Technology Grant Report


Report:

I received a Technology Grant to make enhanced podcasts for a paired class, Introduction to Visual Culture and English Developmental II. I worked in the TLC for 13 days 8 hours/day over the summer of 2006 and co-created a total of 11 enhanced podcasts, which are required listening for the English as a Second Language students enrolled in the paired class.

Enhanced podcasts allow for narration, visuals, music, and sound effects to be mixed in Apple’s program, GarageBand. The journey, in learning how to mix enhanced podcasts for ESL students enrolled in the paired Introduction to Visual Culture and English Developmental II class, was more important than the product produced. I learned skills that I can use in all of my classes.

  • How to create interesting power point slides.
  • How to use a Mac computer.
  • How to mix music, with narration and visuals.
  • How to organize computer files effectively.
  • How to delete computer files for better organization.
  • How computers can be networked to share information quickly and effectively in collaborative projects.

Speech writing and script writing skills were useful when writing the narration. Writing an essay is different than writing a script for an enhanced podcast. In particular, several suggestions come to mind:

  • HOOK: A motivating hook is necessary in the first sentence of the script.
  • RHETORICAL DEVICES: Use of rhetorical devices such as parallel structure, repetition, and contrapuntal turn around add dramatic effect to the script.
  • SENTENCE PATTERNS: Use short pithy sentences to make a point. Use long compound, complex sentences to develop an idea or set a relaxed mood.
  • PACE: A series of short sentences create a fast pace. A series of long sentences create lyrical, poetic verse.

Thinking of the voice as a musical instrument, starting in the diaphragm and ending outside of the mouth assists with enunciation and clarity in the recorded narration. A few suggestions:

  • UPTALK at the END of a SENTENCE: When reading aloud, we were taught to lower our voices to signal the end of a sentence. In broadcast journalism, the opposite is required. The speaker “up talks” at the end of the sentence, so the viewer can hear the end of the sentence. A good example is Tom Brokaw’s speech patterns as his deep baritone voice would be hard to understand if he lowered his voice at the end of a sentence.

--Joan Takayama-Ogawa
Liberal Arts and Sciences

Related: 2005-06 Faculty Development Grant