• Todd Gray

    Oct 25| Lectures

    Todd Gray was born in 1954 in Los Angeles. Gray received an MFA and a BFA from California Institute of the Arts and is currently a professor at California State University, Long Beach. He has shown performance work at REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney CalArts Theater), Los Angeles (2010); California African American Museum, Los Angeles (2009); the Commons, New York University (2008); 18th Street Arts Center, Santa Monica (2008); New Renaissance Theater, Syracuse, NY (2007); and Academy of Media Arts, Cologne (2004).

  • Ruby Neri is a sculptor, painter, and former street artist from San Francisco and Los Angeles, California, known for her evocative portrayal of horses.

  • Otis in NYC
    October 27, 2016 
    6 - 8 pm 
    Franklin Parrasch Gallery
    53 East 64 Street
    New York, NY 10065

    Otis College President Bruce W. Ferguson is coming to NYC! 
    Please come say hello and visit with your fellow alumni and friends of Otis College of Art and Design.
    Drinks and hors d'oeuvres.


  • Lecture takes place at 356 S. Mission Rd., co-presented with Ben Maltz Gallery in conjunction with the exhibition Polly Apfelbaum: Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

    New York-based critic and independent curator Bob Nickas presents his musings on one hundred paintings, choosing one from each year from 1915-2015.

  • Bob Nickas

    Oct 31| Lectures

    Bob Nickas is a critic and independent curator based in New York, having organized more than ninety exhibitions since 1984.
    He was Curatorial Advisor at P.S.1/MoMA in New York between 2004-07, where his exhibitions include: 
    Lee Lozano: Drawn From Life; 
    William Gedney—Christopher Wool: Into the Night; 
    Stephen Shore: American Surfaces; 
    Wolfgang Tillmans: Freedom From The Known. 

  • Looking at the recent works of Sebastian Stumpf one finds an interplay between performance and the recording of performance, between the execution of a physical act and the documentation of it by means of a camera. [He] operates in two distinct realms: in the empty spaces of contemporary art institutions and in urban settings with their preexisting orders. […] An inconspicuous architectural detail suddenly becomes the catalyst for a physical exploit…. The art gallery becomes a space for action.

  • Passionate Voices Expressed in Sound Bearing Plastic: An Evening with Collector Richard Shelton


Joan Takayama-Ogawa: 2006 TLC Technology Grant Report


I received a Technology Grant to make enhanced podcasts for a paired class, Introduction to Visual Culture and English Developmental II. I worked in the TLC for 13 days 8 hours/day over the summer of 2006 and co-created a total of 11 enhanced podcasts, which are required listening for the English as a Second Language students enrolled in the paired class.

Enhanced podcasts allow for narration, visuals, music, and sound effects to be mixed in Apple’s program, GarageBand. The journey, in learning how to mix enhanced podcasts for ESL students enrolled in the paired Introduction to Visual Culture and English Developmental II class, was more important than the product produced. I learned skills that I can use in all of my classes.

  • How to create interesting power point slides.
  • How to use a Mac computer.
  • How to mix music, with narration and visuals.
  • How to organize computer files effectively.
  • How to delete computer files for better organization.
  • How computers can be networked to share information quickly and effectively in collaborative projects.

Speech writing and script writing skills were useful when writing the narration. Writing an essay is different than writing a script for an enhanced podcast. In particular, several suggestions come to mind:

  • HOOK: A motivating hook is necessary in the first sentence of the script.
  • RHETORICAL DEVICES: Use of rhetorical devices such as parallel structure, repetition, and contrapuntal turn around add dramatic effect to the script.
  • SENTENCE PATTERNS: Use short pithy sentences to make a point. Use long compound, complex sentences to develop an idea or set a relaxed mood.
  • PACE: A series of short sentences create a fast pace. A series of long sentences create lyrical, poetic verse.

Thinking of the voice as a musical instrument, starting in the diaphragm and ending outside of the mouth assists with enunciation and clarity in the recorded narration. A few suggestions:

  • UPTALK at the END of a SENTENCE: When reading aloud, we were taught to lower our voices to signal the end of a sentence. In broadcast journalism, the opposite is required. The speaker “up talks” at the end of the sentence, so the viewer can hear the end of the sentence. A good example is Tom Brokaw’s speech patterns as his deep baritone voice would be hard to understand if he lowered his voice at the end of a sentence.

--Joan Takayama-Ogawa
Liberal Arts and Sciences

Related: 2005-06 Faculty Development Grant

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