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  • Silke Otto-Knapp is a painter and associate professor of painting and drawing at UCLA. 
     
    She has had recent one-person exhibitions at Overduin and Kite, Los Angeles; Galerie Buchholz, Berlin; the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive; Greengrassi, London; Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London; Kunstverein Munich, Germany; Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, New York; the Banff Centre, Canada; Modern Art Oxford, UK; and Tate Britain, London.
     
  • Sergej Jensen

    Mar 31| Lectures
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    Sergej Jensen’s work draws on a wide range of materials and formal references. Primarily known for his textile works, his lyrical compositions incorporate a variety of fabrics, from burlap and linen to silk and wool.
     
    He recently exhibited his work in the show "Classic" at Regen Projects, and his work is also included in LACMA's show "Variations: Conversations in and around Abstract Painting.”
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  • Otis College of Art and Design Fine Arts Department presents the film collaborative from Berlin OJOBOCA.

     

    Thursday April 2nd, 2015
    7pm in Ahmanson Hall, lower-level screening room.
    9045 Lincoln Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90045

     

  • Chen Tamir is a distinguished Israeli curator and art writer based in Tel Aviv, where she works at the Center for Contemporary Art. She was listed by Artslant as one of 15 curators to watch in 2015. Until recently she was based in New York working as an independent curator and also as Executive Director of Flux Factory, a non-profit arts center in Queens, NY, where she founded an acclaimed residency program and set up a thriving institution. Chen holds an M.A. from Bard College's Center for Curatorial Studies, a B.A. in Anthropology, and a B.F.A. in Visual Art from York University.

  • Rea Tajiri

    Apr 07| Lectures
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    Rea Tajiri is a New York based filmmaker and educator who has written and directed an eclectic body of dramatic, experimental, and documentary films currently in commercial and educational distribution. She is also an Associate Professor at Temple University in the Film Media Arts Department.
     
    Learn more about the artist here.
     
  • Dusk to Dusk

    Apr 11| Exhibition
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    James Aldridge, The Gathering, 2010, Acrylic on canvas


    Dusk to Dusk: Unsettled, Unraveled, Unreal

    April 11 - July 26, 2015  |  Gallery Hours: Tue-Fri 10-5 / Thu 10-7 / Sat-Sun 12-4

O-Tube

Joan Takayama-Ogawa: 2006 TLC Technology Grant Report


Report:

I received a Technology Grant to make enhanced podcasts for a paired class, Introduction to Visual Culture and English Developmental II. I worked in the TLC for 13 days 8 hours/day over the summer of 2006 and co-created a total of 11 enhanced podcasts, which are required listening for the English as a Second Language students enrolled in the paired class.

Enhanced podcasts allow for narration, visuals, music, and sound effects to be mixed in Apple’s program, GarageBand. The journey, in learning how to mix enhanced podcasts for ESL students enrolled in the paired Introduction to Visual Culture and English Developmental II class, was more important than the product produced. I learned skills that I can use in all of my classes.

  • How to create interesting power point slides.
  • How to use a Mac computer.
  • How to mix music, with narration and visuals.
  • How to organize computer files effectively.
  • How to delete computer files for better organization.
  • How computers can be networked to share information quickly and effectively in collaborative projects.

Speech writing and script writing skills were useful when writing the narration. Writing an essay is different than writing a script for an enhanced podcast. In particular, several suggestions come to mind:

  • HOOK: A motivating hook is necessary in the first sentence of the script.
  • RHETORICAL DEVICES: Use of rhetorical devices such as parallel structure, repetition, and contrapuntal turn around add dramatic effect to the script.
  • SENTENCE PATTERNS: Use short pithy sentences to make a point. Use long compound, complex sentences to develop an idea or set a relaxed mood.
  • PACE: A series of short sentences create a fast pace. A series of long sentences create lyrical, poetic verse.

Thinking of the voice as a musical instrument, starting in the diaphragm and ending outside of the mouth assists with enunciation and clarity in the recorded narration. A few suggestions:

  • UPTALK at the END of a SENTENCE: When reading aloud, we were taught to lower our voices to signal the end of a sentence. In broadcast journalism, the opposite is required. The speaker “up talks” at the end of the sentence, so the viewer can hear the end of the sentence. A good example is Tom Brokaw’s speech patterns as his deep baritone voice would be hard to understand if he lowered his voice at the end of a sentence.

--Joan Takayama-Ogawa
Liberal Arts and Sciences

Related: 2005-06 Faculty Development Grant