Otis College of Art and Design logo
Events
  • Women of Otis, Please Join…. 

     

    Victoria Alonso 

    Executive Vice President of Visual Effects and Post Production, Marvel Studios 
    In a conversation about how to become a successful woman in a male dominated field 

     

    Thursday, October 30 

    The Forum 

    11:00 – 12:30 

     

    *open to women students, faculty and staff.

  • Phillip Zach

    Oct 30| Lectures
    More

    Graduate Fine Arts, Visiting Artist Lecture Series presents artist, Phillip Zach.

    Thursday, October 30th 11:15am - 12:30pm

    Graduate Studios: 10455 Jefferson Blvd Culver City CA 90230

     

  • Visit the Campus. Get advice on your portfolio. Talk to faculty and students. Learn more about financial aid.

     

    Register now for Open House 2014.

     

    CHECK-IN BEGINS AT 12:30
    WORKSHOPS 

    1:00 – 1:45
    Financing Your Education
    Center for Creative Professions: Create Your Future 

    2:00 – 2:45
    Housing Options: Making a Good Fit

  • Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week 4-6pm is Waves to Asia with DJ Pheonix, DJ Z and DJ Kai, bringing some Asian culture to the air waves, including J-Pop, K-Pop and Chinese Pop, as well as popular anime music. Also as part of the show we will feature a talk about Asian food that you can get and try in Los Angeles.

     

  • Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

    This week 4-5pm is Rewind 1976 with DJ’s Gabriel Rojas, Nauseous P, and Little C. Join us to count down the songs on the top of the charts... 1976 style. We'll be playing the hits as if it's that very Autumn day 30+ years ago.

  • Otis Radio: Rap Realm

    Nov 10| Special Event
    More

     

    Creative Action and the Otis Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

  • Scott Short

    Nov 11| Lectures
    More
     
    Scott Short | Born 1964 in Marion, OH | Lives and works in Paris, France 

     

O-Tube

Joan Takayama-Ogawa: 2006 TLC Technology Grant Report


Report:

I received a Technology Grant to make enhanced podcasts for a paired class, Introduction to Visual Culture and English Developmental II. I worked in the TLC for 13 days 8 hours/day over the summer of 2006 and co-created a total of 11 enhanced podcasts, which are required listening for the English as a Second Language students enrolled in the paired class.

Enhanced podcasts allow for narration, visuals, music, and sound effects to be mixed in Apple’s program, GarageBand. The journey, in learning how to mix enhanced podcasts for ESL students enrolled in the paired Introduction to Visual Culture and English Developmental II class, was more important than the product produced. I learned skills that I can use in all of my classes.

  • How to create interesting power point slides.
  • How to use a Mac computer.
  • How to mix music, with narration and visuals.
  • How to organize computer files effectively.
  • How to delete computer files for better organization.
  • How computers can be networked to share information quickly and effectively in collaborative projects.

Speech writing and script writing skills were useful when writing the narration. Writing an essay is different than writing a script for an enhanced podcast. In particular, several suggestions come to mind:

  • HOOK: A motivating hook is necessary in the first sentence of the script.
  • RHETORICAL DEVICES: Use of rhetorical devices such as parallel structure, repetition, and contrapuntal turn around add dramatic effect to the script.
  • SENTENCE PATTERNS: Use short pithy sentences to make a point. Use long compound, complex sentences to develop an idea or set a relaxed mood.
  • PACE: A series of short sentences create a fast pace. A series of long sentences create lyrical, poetic verse.

Thinking of the voice as a musical instrument, starting in the diaphragm and ending outside of the mouth assists with enunciation and clarity in the recorded narration. A few suggestions:

  • UPTALK at the END of a SENTENCE: When reading aloud, we were taught to lower our voices to signal the end of a sentence. In broadcast journalism, the opposite is required. The speaker “up talks” at the end of the sentence, so the viewer can hear the end of the sentence. A good example is Tom Brokaw’s speech patterns as his deep baritone voice would be hard to understand if he lowered his voice at the end of a sentence.

--Joan Takayama-Ogawa
Liberal Arts and Sciences

Related: 2005-06 Faculty Development Grant