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Events
  • Angie Kim

    MFA Exhibition: SAME

    Reception Thursday, Feb 6th, 6-9 pm

  • Amy Adler

    Feb 03| Lectures
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    Amy Adler graduated from Cooper Union and received an MFA in Visual Art from UCLA and an MFA in Cinematic Arts from USC. She has had one person shows at the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and The Aspen Art Museum as well as galleries worldwide. 
     
  • same / mfa THESIS EXHIBITION 



    Angie Kim

    Exhibition, February 2 - 8, 2015 

    Reception, February 5, 6:00 - 9:00pm
 

    
Map of Location

     
  • Walk-thru the exhibition Shhhh led by the artist Angie Bray. Gain insight into Bray's work and to the exhibition, and hear about her process, materials, and philosophies on art-making and on quieting, listening, and looking.

  • Alex Israel

    Feb 10| Lectures
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    The work of Alex Israel is deeply entwined with his hometown of Los Angeles. The artist creates art that riffs on Hollywood culture and the cult of celebrity. His first major body of work consisted of rented studio props, transformed into readymades by their placement in the gallery—some blatantly obvious in their artificiality. He gave celebrities the same treatment in the video series “As It Lays”, video portraits based on campy TV talk shows.
  • Menno Cruijsen, Lava Design
    February 12, 12:30-1:30, Ahmanson 6th floor

    Lava was founded in 1990 by creative director Hans Wolbers (the Netherlands, 1965). The current team consists of 10 talented designers and three projectmanagers. The agency is focused on creative strategy, editorial design and dynamic identities.

    http://www.lava.nl

  • MAKING SENSE / Thesis Exhibition 



    Exhibition, February 16 - 21, 2015 

    Reception, February  19, 6:00 - 9:00pm
 

    
Map of Location

     

    

Website: www.rachelwolfe.com | Blog: howlya.tumblr.com

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Visa Interview Tips

Scheduling your F-1 Visa Interview:

  • Your SEVIS ID Number = located above barcode strip on Page 1 of your SEVIS I-20 (under Attached Documents box)
  • {Your institution's abbreviation} school code: {Your institution's school code}
  • Submit required SEVIS I-901 Fee at: www.fmjfee.com

                         *Note: if you are citizen of Canada you can skip the remaining steps as you are not required to obtain a F-1 visa.

When applying for your F-1 student visa, it is important to remember that F-1 is a non-immigrant visa type. Visa interviews usually last only 1-3 minutes and the visa official is looking for you to convince him/her that you do not plan to immigrate to the U.S. and do plan to return to your home country after completing your degree at {Your institution's abbreviation}.

Tips for Visa Interview Questions:

1. TIES TO HOME COUNTRY
Under U.S. law, all applicants for non-immigrant visas are viewed as intending immigrants until they can convince the consular officer that they are not. Thus, you must be able to show that you have reasons for returning to your country that are stronger than those for remaining in the United States. "Ties" to your home country include the following: family, job, financial assets that you own or will inherit, investments etc.  The interviewing officer may ask about your plans for future employment, family or other relationships, educational objectives, and long-term plans in general in your home country. Each person's situation is different and there is no guarantee of visa approval.

2. ENGLISH ABILITY
Anticipate that the interview will be conducted in English and not in your native language. One suggestion is to practice English conversation with a native speaker before the interview. If you are coming to the United States solely to study intensive English (IELP), be prepared to explain how English will be useful for you in your home country.

3. SPEAK FOR YOURSELF
Do not bring parents or family members with you to the interview; the consular officer wants to interview you, not your family. A negative impression is created if you are not prepared to speak on your own behalf.

4. KNOW YOUR ACADEMIC PROGRAM AND HOW IT FITS YOUR CAREER PLANS
If you are not able to articulate the reasons you will study in a particular {Your institution's abbreviation} program, you may not succeed in convincing the consular officer that you are indeed planning to study, rather than to immigrate to the U.S. You should also be able to explain how studying in the U.S. relates to you future professional career when you return home.

5. BE CONCISE
Because of the volume of applications received, all consular officers are under considerable time pressure to conduct a quick and efficient interview. They must often make a decision, on the impressions they form during the first minute or two of the interview. Consequently, what you say first and the initial impression you create are critical to your success. Keep your answers to the officer's questions short and to the point.

6. SUPPLEMENTAL DOCUMENTATION
It should be clear at a glance to the consular officer what written documents you are presenting and what they signify. Lengthy written explanations cannot be quickly read or evaluated. Remember that you will have 2-3 minutes of interview time, if you're lucky, and all documents should be official or certified originals.

7. NOT ALL COUNTRIES ARE EQUAL
Applicants from countries suffering economic problems or from countries where many people have stayed in the United States as immigrants will have more difficulty getting visas. Statistically, applicants from those countries are more likely to be asked about job opportunities at home after their study in the United States. Additional documentation or processing time may be required.

8. EMPLOYMENT
Your main purpose of coming to the United States should be to study, not for the chance to work before or after graduation. While many students do work off-campus during their studies, such employment is secondary to their main purpose of completing their education. You must be able to clearly articulate your plan to return home at the end of your program. If your spouse is applying for an accompanying F-2 visa, be aware that F-2 dependents cannot, under any circumstances, be employed in the U.S.  If asked, be prepared to address what your spouse intends to do with his or her time while in the U.S. Volunteer work and attending school part-time are permitted activities.

9. DEPENDENTS REMAINING AT HOME
If your spouse and/or children are remaining in your home country, be prepared to address how they will support themselves in your absence. This can be an especially tricky area if you are the primary source of income for your family. If the consular general officer gains the impression that your family members will need you to send money from the U.S. in order to support them, your F-1 student visa application will almost certainly be denied. If your family does decide to join you at a later time, it is helpful to have them apply at the same post where you applied for your visa.

10. MAINTAIN A POSITIVE ATTITUDE
Do not engage the consular officer in an argument. If you are denied a student visa, ask the officer for a list of documents he/she would suggest you bring in order to overcome the refusal, and try to get the reason you were denied in writing.