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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Visa Interview Tips

Scheduling your F-1 Visa Interview:

  • Your SEVIS ID Number = located above barcode strip on Page 1 of your SEVIS I-20 (under Attached Documents box)
  • {Your institution's abbreviation} school code: {Your institution's school code}
  • Submit required SEVIS I-901 Fee at: www.fmjfee.com

                         *Note: if you are citizen of Canada you can skip the remaining steps as you are not required to obtain a F-1 visa.

When applying for your F-1 student visa, it is important to remember that F-1 is a non-immigrant visa type. Visa interviews usually last only 1-3 minutes and the visa official is looking for you to convince him/her that you do not plan to immigrate to the U.S. and do plan to return to your home country after completing your degree at {Your institution's abbreviation}.

Tips for Visa Interview Questions:

Under U.S. law, all applicants for non-immigrant visas are viewed as intending immigrants until they can convince the consular officer that they are not. Thus, you must be able to show that you have reasons for returning to your country that are stronger than those for remaining in the United States. "Ties" to your home country include the following: family, job, financial assets that you own or will inherit, investments etc.  The interviewing officer may ask about your plans for future employment, family or other relationships, educational objectives, and long-term plans in general in your home country. Each person's situation is different and there is no guarantee of visa approval.

Anticipate that the interview will be conducted in English and not in your native language. One suggestion is to practice English conversation with a native speaker before the interview. If you are coming to the United States solely to study intensive English (IELP), be prepared to explain how English will be useful for you in your home country.

Do not bring parents or family members with you to the interview; the consular officer wants to interview you, not your family. A negative impression is created if you are not prepared to speak on your own behalf.

If you are not able to articulate the reasons you will study in a particular {Your institution's abbreviation} program, you may not succeed in convincing the consular officer that you are indeed planning to study, rather than to immigrate to the U.S. You should also be able to explain how studying in the U.S. relates to you future professional career when you return home.

Because of the volume of applications received, all consular officers are under considerable time pressure to conduct a quick and efficient interview. They must often make a decision, on the impressions they form during the first minute or two of the interview. Consequently, what you say first and the initial impression you create are critical to your success. Keep your answers to the officer's questions short and to the point.

It should be clear at a glance to the consular officer what written documents you are presenting and what they signify. Lengthy written explanations cannot be quickly read or evaluated. Remember that you will have 2-3 minutes of interview time, if you're lucky, and all documents should be official or certified originals.

Applicants from countries suffering economic problems or from countries where many people have stayed in the United States as immigrants will have more difficulty getting visas. Statistically, applicants from those countries are more likely to be asked about job opportunities at home after their study in the United States. Additional documentation or processing time may be required.

Your main purpose of coming to the United States should be to study, not for the chance to work before or after graduation. While many students do work off-campus during their studies, such employment is secondary to their main purpose of completing their education. You must be able to clearly articulate your plan to return home at the end of your program. If your spouse is applying for an accompanying F-2 visa, be aware that F-2 dependents cannot, under any circumstances, be employed in the U.S.  If asked, be prepared to address what your spouse intends to do with his or her time while in the U.S. Volunteer work and attending school part-time are permitted activities.

If your spouse and/or children are remaining in your home country, be prepared to address how they will support themselves in your absence. This can be an especially tricky area if you are the primary source of income for your family. If the consular general officer gains the impression that your family members will need you to send money from the U.S. in order to support them, your F-1 student visa application will almost certainly be denied. If your family does decide to join you at a later time, it is helpful to have them apply at the same post where you applied for your visa.

Do not engage the consular officer in an argument. If you are denied a student visa, ask the officer for a list of documents he/she would suggest you bring in order to overcome the refusal, and try to get the reason you were denied in writing.