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  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

O-Tube

Holly Tempo: 2009-10 Faculty Development Grant Report


Funded Project:

Attendance at the Can Serrat Artist Residency Program in El Bruc, Spain, October 1-31, 2009 to explore the relationship between color and dystopia and create an artist book.

I have always wanted to visit Spain, and finally got an opportunity to do so in October. I took a month off from teaching and spent time at the Masia Can Serrat, a creative enclave established by 12 Norwegian artists some 20 years ago. Can Serrat is located in the small town of El Bruc and is 45 minutes by bus from Barcelona.

I went to Spain to work on an artist book about color and dystopia. A dystopia is defined as an undesirable society where the quality of life is both defined and compromised by oppression, poverty, violence, and disease, resulting in unhappiness, suffering and pain. A dystopic society may also be a society that self-identifies as a utopia, but suffers from one fatal flaw.

I went to Can Serrat, expecting to intellectually consider unhappiness while living and working in a pastoral setting with other creative people. What I found when I arrived was that I was to reside in close proximity to a clique of misanthropes; and, by default, experience dystopic living first-hand. As the saying goes: Be careful what you go looking for as you may find it…

--Holly Tempo
Associate Professor of Painting, Fine Arts

Read Full Report [PDF]

Olive orchard near Can Serrat

Olive orchard near Can Serrat

Masia Can Serrat

Masia Can Serrat