Events
  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 4:00 - 5:00 pm is Welcome to the Haunted Boulevard. Join DJ Platinum (Grace Potter) and DJ Batsy (Jessi Hita) for a journey of the folklores, urban legends, and paranormal encounters from different cultures. 

     

    Listen online at KLMU.

  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

  • Mexican artist Yoshua Okón’s videos blur the lines between documentary, reality, and fiction. He collaborates closely with his actors (often amateurs who are also the subjects of the work) to create sociological examinations that ask viewers to contemplate uncomfortable situations and circumstances.
  • Dana Johnson is the author of the short story collection In the Not Quite Dark. She is also the author of Break Any Woman Down, winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, and the novel Elsewhere, California.

  • Gallery 169 will be hosting the Otis College of Art and Design Communication Arts Graphic Design Junior Show, "5328," displaying a selection of work made over the five thousand twenty eight hours that make up the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Work will include collected posters, publications, and typographic projects.
  • Clay, Body is a solo exhibition from artist Sydney Aubert: Unapologetically fat, crass, and sexual, a ceramics artist who also works in video, and whatever other materials arouse her in the moment. Exhibition will be on view from Monday, April 24 - Friday, April 28 at the Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design. On view by appointment only, please contact the artist at sydney.aubert@gmail.com Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6pm-9pm Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design

  • Audrey Wollen is a feminist theorist and visual artist based in Los Angeles. Wollen uses social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, as platforms for her work on Sad Girl Theory, a theory which posits that internalized female sadness can be used as a radical and political action, separate from masculinized forms of protests such as anger and violence. She introduces this form of protest as an alternative to masculinized anger and violence.

O-Tube

BFA Graphic Design Alumna Satsuki Shibuya

Dec 16, 2013
Spotlight Category: Alumni

Satsuki Shibuya (’07 Communication Arts)
Shibuya Designs
www.satsukishibuya.com

My escapades thus far have included studying music at the University of Southern California and graphic design at Otis, pursuing a career as a singer/songwriter, delving into hard processes such as pattern design and sewing, launching a design studio, as well as raising a dog that loves treats and naps a little too much. My most recent pursuits have involved culinary experimentation, ‘zine publication, paper creations and making everyday living goods. Fueled by a combination of her love for nature, appreciation for the simple things in life, and passion for exploration, I forge ahead on my ever-evolving journey and invite you to join me!

Starting up
I had been thinking of starting up my own company for quite some time, even day dreaming about it during my studies at Otis. I decided when I graduated that if I wanted to try something, better sooner than later. I felt that I had enough experience from previous jobs and wanted to create in the way that I envisioned with full creative control.

Biggest reward
I am able to create what I want, when I want, and express my thoughts, feelings and philosophies in a way that I wouldn’t be able to do otherwise. Biggest challenge
Finding the balance between work and life. It is so easy to get caught up in something, especially if you love what you do, but I’ve realized the importance of giving yourself downtime. I used to worry that if I didn’t spend every waking moment doing something work-related, I would fall behind. Now I know that I am even more productive if I give myself the time to unwind and enjoy life.

Breakthrough moment
I sat down and really thought about my personal values and what I wanted out of work. At the end of the day, it wasn’t money that inspired me or fame, but more the freedom the express my own thoughts and philosophies. When I realized this, I knew wholeheartedly that I couldn’t do anything except something on my own.

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