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  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

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Alumna Alexandra Cantle

Jul 18, 2014
Spotlight Category: Alumni

Alexandra Cantle Projects

Graduate Public Practice

Alexandra Cantle

 
From Alexandra Cantle’s experience and understanding of people with dyslexia, she is aware of the myriad strengths and weaknesses that people with learning disabilities have. Alexandra is interested in the emotional components that come with having dyslexia, and how, without attention to one’s feelings, emotional wounds become deeply suppressed. Through guidance and reflection, individuals can become more in-touch with their emotions, thus gaining awareness of the effects learning disabilities have had on their self-esteem.
 
Alexandra’s art practice focuses on creating engagement, community, and public awareness about and among people who learn differently, through a variety of media. The points of access to her work are intended to inform the general public, as well as dyslexics, about the impacts of learning disabilities. Through community-building on a public scale she aims to bring awareness to the emotional effects of having dyslexia in our society and to re-position the overvaluing of written language-based intellect.
 
Alexandra received her bachelor’s degree in Art from the University of California, Los Angeles and recieved her Masters of Fine Art, Public Practice program in 2013 at Otis College of Art and Design.
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