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Events
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

O-Tube

Academic Excellence: Alec Egan

What's Next?
I had a show in Amsterdam, which was a really amazing experience, and have several shows coming up in L.A.

 

Hometown?
Los Angeles
 

Why Otis?

Otis was always on my mind because Phillip Guston, my favorite painter, attended Otis. I had been out on the road and
alone for a long time, all over the country, thinking that something was going to happen with my painting career. After a few pitfalls, I decided I didn’t know as much as I thought I did, and decided to go to grad school. I saw being back in L.A. and going to Otis as having a grounding effect on me, allowing me to produce work in a place with some modicum of familiarity and, therefore, safety (which I needed).
 

Your thesis project?
It was more or less about “the personal”; my inability to create a fantasy to deal with my fear of the “unknown.” In many ways, it was a kind of existential quest about a fantasy that falls apart.
Interesting things you did outside of school?
I tried a food challenge in Burlington, Vermont three times one year, and ate five pounds of barbecue in an hour. I failed all three times.
 

Most influential class?
Critique was both the most influential and traumatizing.
 

Favorite place in L.A.?
My bedroom
 

Impact on your work/life?
Otis changed my work and my life a lot. It was the most intense experience I’ve ever had. In the best way, it showed me how to go forward with my work rather than being simply happy to do it.
 

Something unusual/idiosyncratic?
I don’t like transitions but I am addicted to them.
 

Information/tips to share with future students?
Keep your head down. Just because you’re an inmate doesn’t mean you have to act like one. Don’t trust the guards, and make as much work in.

Check out a video on Alec's work...