• Todd Gray

    Oct 25| Lectures

    Todd Gray was born in 1954 in Los Angeles. Gray received an MFA and a BFA from California Institute of the Arts and is currently a professor at California State University, Long Beach. He has shown performance work at REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney CalArts Theater), Los Angeles (2010); California African American Museum, Los Angeles (2009); the Commons, New York University (2008); 18th Street Arts Center, Santa Monica (2008); New Renaissance Theater, Syracuse, NY (2007); and Academy of Media Arts, Cologne (2004).

  • Ruby Neri is a sculptor, painter, and former street artist from San Francisco and Los Angeles, California, known for her evocative portrayal of horses.

  • Otis in NYC
    October 27, 2016 
    6 - 8 pm 
    Franklin Parrasch Gallery
    53 East 64 Street
    New York, NY 10065

    Otis College President Bruce W. Ferguson is coming to NYC! 
    Please come say hello and visit with your fellow alumni and friends of Otis College of Art and Design.
    Drinks and hors d'oeuvres.


  • Lecture takes place at 356 S. Mission Rd., co-presented with Ben Maltz Gallery in conjunction with the exhibition Polly Apfelbaum: Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

    New York-based critic and independent curator Bob Nickas presents his musings on one hundred paintings, choosing one from each year from 1915-2015.

  • Bob Nickas

    Oct 31| Lectures

    Bob Nickas is a critic and independent curator based in New York, having organized more than ninety exhibitions since 1984.
    He was Curatorial Advisor at P.S.1/MoMA in New York between 2004-07, where his exhibitions include: 
    Lee Lozano: Drawn From Life; 
    William Gedney—Christopher Wool: Into the Night; 
    Stephen Shore: American Surfaces; 
    Wolfgang Tillmans: Freedom From The Known. 

  • Looking at the recent works of Sebastian Stumpf one finds an interplay between performance and the recording of performance, between the execution of a physical act and the documentation of it by means of a camera. [He] operates in two distinct realms: in the empty spaces of contemporary art institutions and in urban settings with their preexisting orders. […] An inconspicuous architectural detail suddenly becomes the catalyst for a physical exploit…. The art gallery becomes a space for action.

  • Passionate Voices Expressed in Sound Bearing Plastic: An Evening with Collector Richard Shelton


Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia ('07 MFA)

Jan 22, 2014
LA Times Review
Spotlight Category: Alumni

Art review: Faculty member Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia weaves a colorful landscape

Critic's Choice December 19, 2013 |By David Pagel

Last year, Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia exhibited a series of dazzling abstractions that he had made by shredding works on paper into long, skinny strips and then weaving the strips into place-mat-style paintings that simultaneously evoked digital transmissions on the fritz, plaid fabrics stretched by swinging hips and banners flapping in the wind.

This year, in a breakout exhibition at CB1 Gallery, Hurtado Segovia expands the range and intensifies the impact of his ingenious works. Making a mess of distinctions between painting and sculpture, not to mention art and craft, the L.A. artist who was born in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, invites visitors into a world where nothing sits still — least of all, your imagination.

The high-ceilinged main gallery is one part enchanted forest and one part holy chapel. Not one of its 21 works hangs on the wall, like a painting, or takes up much space, like a traditional sculpture. Yet you’re bathed in color. And you’ll want to walk around each piece, so as not to miss the golden glow that reflects off a huge woven work suspended in midair and the gorgeous rainbow of tertiary tints that leaps from the 18 freestanding dowels, some 12 feet tall, that Hurtado Segovia has wrapped in colorful cords ordinarily used to weave rugs.

A side gallery includes fewer pieces but no less drama. Three two-sided woven paper pieces, set atop elegant pedestals, revel in the pleasure, and the power, of asymmetry. On the back wall, a big painting similarly celebrates illogic, inconsistency, impossibility. Part interior, part landscape and part street scene, it takes its place in a sophisticated exhibition that makes room for life’s multilayered richness without taking up much space or wasting a minute.

CB1 Gallery, 207 W. 5th St., (213) 806-7889, through Jan. 26. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays.