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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia ('07 MFA)

Jan 22, 2014
LA Times Review
Spotlight Category: Alumni

Art review: Faculty member Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia weaves a colorful landscape

Critic's Choice December 19, 2013 |By David Pagel

Last year, Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia exhibited a series of dazzling abstractions that he had made by shredding works on paper into long, skinny strips and then weaving the strips into place-mat-style paintings that simultaneously evoked digital transmissions on the fritz, plaid fabrics stretched by swinging hips and banners flapping in the wind.

This year, in a breakout exhibition at CB1 Gallery, Hurtado Segovia expands the range and intensifies the impact of his ingenious works. Making a mess of distinctions between painting and sculpture, not to mention art and craft, the L.A. artist who was born in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, invites visitors into a world where nothing sits still — least of all, your imagination.

The high-ceilinged main gallery is one part enchanted forest and one part holy chapel. Not one of its 21 works hangs on the wall, like a painting, or takes up much space, like a traditional sculpture. Yet you’re bathed in color. And you’ll want to walk around each piece, so as not to miss the golden glow that reflects off a huge woven work suspended in midair and the gorgeous rainbow of tertiary tints that leaps from the 18 freestanding dowels, some 12 feet tall, that Hurtado Segovia has wrapped in colorful cords ordinarily used to weave rugs.

A side gallery includes fewer pieces but no less drama. Three two-sided woven paper pieces, set atop elegant pedestals, revel in the pleasure, and the power, of asymmetry. On the back wall, a big painting similarly celebrates illogic, inconsistency, impossibility. Part interior, part landscape and part street scene, it takes its place in a sophisticated exhibition that makes room for life’s multilayered richness without taking up much space or wasting a minute.

CB1 Gallery, 207 W. 5th St., (213) 806-7889, through Jan. 26. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays. www.cb1gallery.com