Events
  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 4:00 - 5:00 pm is Welcome to the Haunted Boulevard. Join DJ Platinum (Grace Potter) and DJ Batsy (Jessi Hita) for a journey of the folklores, urban legends, and paranormal encounters from different cultures. 

     

    Listen online at KLMU.

  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

  • Mexican artist Yoshua Okón’s videos blur the lines between documentary, reality, and fiction. He collaborates closely with his actors (often amateurs who are also the subjects of the work) to create sociological examinations that ask viewers to contemplate uncomfortable situations and circumstances.
  • Dana Johnson is the author of the short story collection In the Not Quite Dark. She is also the author of Break Any Woman Down, winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, and the novel Elsewhere, California.

  • Gallery 169 will be hosting the Otis College of Art and Design Communication Arts Graphic Design Junior Show, "5328," displaying a selection of work made over the five thousand twenty eight hours that make up the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Work will include collected posters, publications, and typographic projects.
  • Clay, Body is a solo exhibition from artist Sydney Aubert: Unapologetically fat, crass, and sexual, a ceramics artist who also works in video, and whatever other materials arouse her in the moment. Exhibition will be on view from Monday, April 24 - Friday, April 28 at the Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design. On view by appointment only, please contact the artist at sydney.aubert@gmail.com Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6pm-9pm Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design

  • Audrey Wollen is a feminist theorist and visual artist based in Los Angeles. Wollen uses social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, as platforms for her work on Sad Girl Theory, a theory which posits that internalized female sadness can be used as a radical and political action, separate from masculinized forms of protests such as anger and violence. She introduces this form of protest as an alternative to masculinized anger and violence.

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Academic Excellence: Lilit Garibian

Why Otis?
Seeing the display of student work convinced me. Also, I was really excited about working on mentor projects!

 

Hometown?
Glendale, California

 

Your thesis project?
In my senior year I worked with two mentors—Cynthia Vincent (’86) and Betsy Heimann of Western Costume. The process includes developing material boards, illustrations, sketch selection, pattern drafting, draping and sewing, and several fittings. We create all the garments from scratch.

 

Interesting things you did outside of school?
Last summer I interned in New York. I knew I’d love the city, and it was everything I thought it would be.

 

Most influential class?
Design/portfolio, especially the CFDA (Council of Fashion Designers of America) project. We had to complete the project in a very intense and short few weeks, and for the first time we were working on our own concepts and ideas.
I learned a lot about myself as a designer, as I was allowed almost total creative freedom.

 

Most influential faculty member?
I had the pleasure of working with many great instructors, but I have to say that Jill Higashi had a huge impact on me. Her work ethic and the discipline she instills are a big part of the success of Otis fashion design! She continually inspired me, believed in me, and molded me into
a much better designer!

 

Favorite place in L.A.?
I’ve been going to the Getty since I was a kid. Other than the beautiful art, I love the architecture and the tram. My favorite part is the garden. Also, the view of L.A. is wonderful!

 

Impact on your work/life?
My three years were a life-changing experience. Many difficult times seemed impossible to overcome, but I always came through; every time I accomplished something, I proved to myself that I could do it. After surviving Otis, there is no
task that I cannot handle. Bring it on! Also, I made some of the best friends I’ve ever had. We were like crazy family members who loved and sometimes hated each other. We couldn’t have done it without each other’s support.

 

What’s next?
I am living in Seattle and working as an associate designer for women’s knits at Eddie Bauer. I was a bit hesitant at first about moving to Seattle, but I really love it here. It’s perfect for me!

 

Something unusual/idiosyncratic?
I usually have extreme feelings about things/people.

 

Information/tips for future students?
Go to Otis only if you are very serious about becoming a professional artist/designer. Take it as the greatest challenge of your life, and set your mind to believing that you will get through it no matter what and see it to the end. I focused 98 percent of my life on school. It was extremely challenging, but in the end it was so worth it. If you are really passionate, then it shouldn’t feel too much like work.

Otis College Ranked 6th in Nation by The Economist