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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Academic Excellence: Lilit Garibian

Why Otis?
Seeing the display of student work convinced me. Also, I was really excited about working on mentor projects!


Glendale, California


Your thesis project?
In my senior year I worked with two mentors—Cynthia Vincent (’86) and Betsy Heimann of Western Costume. The process includes developing material boards, illustrations, sketch selection, pattern drafting, draping and sewing, and several fittings. We create all the garments from scratch.


Interesting things you did outside of school?
Last summer I interned in New York. I knew I’d love the city, and it was everything I thought it would be.


Most influential class?
Design/portfolio, especially the CFDA (Council of Fashion Designers of America) project. We had to complete the project in a very intense and short few weeks, and for the first time we were working on our own concepts and ideas.
I learned a lot about myself as a designer, as I was allowed almost total creative freedom.


Most influential faculty member?
I had the pleasure of working with many great instructors, but I have to say that Jill Higashi had a huge impact on me. Her work ethic and the discipline she instills are a big part of the success of Otis fashion design! She continually inspired me, believed in me, and molded me into
a much better designer!


Favorite place in L.A.?
I’ve been going to the Getty since I was a kid. Other than the beautiful art, I love the architecture and the tram. My favorite part is the garden. Also, the view of L.A. is wonderful!


Impact on your work/life?
My three years were a life-changing experience. Many difficult times seemed impossible to overcome, but I always came through; every time I accomplished something, I proved to myself that I could do it. After surviving Otis, there is no
task that I cannot handle. Bring it on! Also, I made some of the best friends I’ve ever had. We were like crazy family members who loved and sometimes hated each other. We couldn’t have done it without each other’s support.


What’s next?
I am living in Seattle and working as an associate designer for women’s knits at Eddie Bauer. I was a bit hesitant at first about moving to Seattle, but I really love it here. It’s perfect for me!


Something unusual/idiosyncratic?
I usually have extreme feelings about things/people.


Information/tips for future students?
Go to Otis only if you are very serious about becoming a professional artist/designer. Take it as the greatest challenge of your life, and set your mind to believing that you will get through it no matter what and see it to the end. I focused 98 percent of my life on school. It was extremely challenging, but in the end it was so worth it. If you are really passionate, then it shouldn’t feel too much like work.