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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Fashion Design Alumna Deborah Sabet

Dec 16, 2013
Spotlight Category: Alumni

Deborah Sabet (’05 Fashion Design)
District Homme

District Homme is a fashion house that believes in the lost art of tailoring and construction while designing one-of-a kind suits for unique individuals. With design headquarters in downtown L.A. and tailors in both L.A. and N.Y., this made-to-measure suitery offers bespoke suits for the modernly masculine man. Each suit represents a creative collaboration, with distinctive fabrics, cuts, colors and details. District Homme has steadily built up an extensive, international clientele base including celebrities and high-power executives. We are currently developing District Femme, to provide custom suits and couture fashion for women.

Starting up
I’ve worked for various retailers – from large corporations to family-owned companies. I realized the best way to achieve everything I wanted was to venture off on my own, and that’s how District Homme was born. I honestly had no idea that I would end up where I am today. Otis introduced me to the possibility of designing menswear and all the choices I made upon graduating pushed me towards creating District Homme.

Biggest reward
I have the biggest smile on my face when I see that a client is happy with the end product and is excited about wearing it, whether on their wedding night or on the red carpet. Having your own business is very different than working for a national retailer, where a lot of people have input on your designs, and you often don’t get to see the final product on a customer. I really enjoy working with my clients from start to finish, while at the same time getting to know them, and designing them a one-of-a-kind suit.

Biggest challenge
As a more creative individual, I struggle to enjoy the days where I have to organize my books, deal with licenses, and pay the bills. I wish all of that stuff just magically worked out on its own. I surround myself with people who know what they are doing, and I learn from them.

Breakthrough moment
A friend I made in N.Y. introduced me to an actor who was starring on Glee, a popular TV show, and in just two short weeks, I designed him a suit that he wore to the Grammy Awards. The exposure I got from that event gave my business the attention and press it needed to get off the ground, and opened my eyes to all that I was capable of.  It was then that I realized I wasn’t meant to design for someone else.

Thank you, Otis!
All that hard work gave me the confidence I needed to be able to walk into any interview believing that no challenge would be out of my reach.

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