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Events
  • Otis welcomes the Japan Foundation and honored guests Kashiwagi Hiroshi and Yoshifumi Nakamura for a lecture on contemporary Japanese design. 
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Matthew Brandt, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Kerry Tribe, an artist working primarily in film, video, and installation. Read more about her here
     
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • You are invited to a Movies that Matter Special Screening of the powerful new film shaping the debate about rape on college campuses, The Hunting Ground, on Tuesday, September 15 at 7:15 PM in the Otis Forum.  The Hunting Ground is a startling exposé of sexual assaults on U.S. colleges, institutional cover-ups and the brutal social toll on the victims and their families from the Academy Award-nominated filmmaking team of Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering.
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by 

  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring Hassan Khan, an artist who lives and works in Cairo, Egypt. Read more about him here.

     

    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu

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Debra Ballard: 2007 TLC Technology Grant Report


Excerpt:

Teaching Uncovered

What are Best Teaching Practices and why should we care? I believe most of us teach at Otis because we genuinely care about the students and their learning (and I can say from experience that is not true of all colleges). However, as faculty we come with many different backgrounds and levels of preparation. I distinctly recall the very first time I walked into my own class (18 years ago, when I was mere 16). I was excited and intimidated. It was then I realized teaching was both an art and a science and became interested in pedagogy, or "the art or science of being a teacher, generally refer[ring] to strategies of instruction or a style of instruction." Up until then I must confess that I assumed if you knew your content, you could watch others do it, use them as a model, and then call upon some teaching gene and perform effortlessly. Though my evals were good and the students seemed to learn, I felt like a fraud, albeit one clever at disguising my inexperience. This was the first time I had the "teaching naked" dream (and in my 18 years of teaching. I’ve become quite the exhibitionist, usually just before the semester begins).

--Debra Ballard
Chair, Liberal Arts and Sciences

View full blog post [originally posted on the O Teaching Matters Blog]