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Events
  • Angie Kim

    MFA Exhibition: SAME

    Reception Thursday, Feb 6th, 6-9 pm

  • Amy Adler

    Feb 03| Lectures
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    Amy Adler graduated from Cooper Union and received an MFA in Visual Art from UCLA and an MFA in Cinematic Arts from USC. She has had one person shows at the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and The Aspen Art Museum as well as galleries worldwide. 
     
  • same / mfa THESIS EXHIBITION 



    Angie Kim

    Exhibition, February 2 - 8, 2015 

    Reception, February 5, 6:00 - 9:00pm
 

    
Map of Location

     
  • Walk-thru the exhibition Shhhh led by the artist Angie Bray. Gain insight into Bray's work and to the exhibition, and hear about her process, materials, and philosophies on art-making and on quieting, listening, and looking.

  • Alex Israel

    Feb 10| Lectures
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    The work of Alex Israel is deeply entwined with his hometown of Los Angeles. The artist creates art that riffs on Hollywood culture and the cult of celebrity. His first major body of work consisted of rented studio props, transformed into readymades by their placement in the gallery—some blatantly obvious in their artificiality. He gave celebrities the same treatment in the video series “As It Lays”, video portraits based on campy TV talk shows.
  • Menno Cruijsen, Lava Design
    February 12, 12:30-1:30, Ahmanson 6th floor

    Lava was founded in 1990 by creative director Hans Wolbers (the Netherlands, 1965). The current team consists of 10 talented designers and three projectmanagers. The agency is focused on creative strategy, editorial design and dynamic identities.

    http://www.lava.nl

  • MAKING SENSE / Thesis Exhibition 



    Exhibition, February 16 - 21, 2015 

    Reception, February  19, 6:00 - 9:00pm
 

    
Map of Location

     

    

Website: www.rachelwolfe.com | Blog: howlya.tumblr.com

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Curricular Connections

Ben Maltz Gallery Curricular Connections Tour


This information is designed to help Otis faculty members prepare their students for visits to the Ben Maltz Gallery. The reference material for each exhibition may vary but included are artists’ biographies and reviews of previous work; essay(s) by the curator(s); didactic material; checklist; and other background information that might be useful in the classroom. To schedule a tour of the exhibition for your group or class, you can do so online using the Tour Scheduling Form.
 

Guide for Current Exhibition

Angie Bray: Shhhh |  January 17 - March 22, 2015

Tips for class visits

Prior to coming to the gallery, review the materials and the information available on the Maltz Gallery’s exhibition page: images, press release, and often a short documentary style video tour.

If attending a scheduled tour with the curator or gallery staff member, take a stroll around the gallery for a first look to gather your impressions before the guided experience.

Ask students to prepare a question for the curator or tour guide prior to coming to the gallery to help create conversation, and to promote discussions.The gallery is for conversation not silence.

Please have students leave their bags in the gallery office while on the tour, and remind them that there is no food or drink allowed in the gallery.
 

Sample Assignments

A collection of helpful ideas for instructors who are designing gallery and exhibition related projects.
Sample Assignment 1

Tips for visiting an art gallery or museum on your own

Do research. See what information is available about the institution or specific exhibition prior to your visit.

Time it right. Check the gallery or museum hours before venturing out, and see if there are any public programs you might want to attend.

Keep an open mind. When you enter the gallery, take a look around the room at the work on your own first, before reading any of the didactic materials. Note your first impressions and then as you learn more about what you are looking at, reflect on how your impressions might change with more information. It’s important to understand the “who, what, where, why and how” of an artist’s intent and the context within which they are making work, but also important to allow for your own response to the work itself.

Ask questions. If you don’t understand what you are looking at or want more information, don’t hesitate to ask the people working at the gallery.

Stay in touch. If you like what you see at a gallery, sign up to be on the mailing list and go back again and again to learn more about their programming. Each venue has a different mission or focus.