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  • Rendering female models and celebrities on large-scale canvases and with quick, expressive brushstrokes, painter Katherine Bernhardt examines representations of beauty in mainstream media and fashion photography. She paints her subjects with severe, exaggerated features and emaciated limbs that sometimes morph into abstraction, recalling the works of Pablo Picasso. “Some people ask if I hate the models I paint,” she says. “I say no, I don't hate them.

  • UpCycle Day 2014!

    Sep 03| Special Event
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    Join us for the 3rd Annual UpCycle Day!

    Learn about the Resource Exchange

    Bring your excess supplies and materials to share and trade. 

    Stock up for the school year with Free supplies and materials. 

    Help divert our collective waste from ending up in landfills.

     

  • Forrest Gander

    Sep 03| Lectures
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    Otis Books/Seismicity Editions is pleased to publish Panic Cure: Poetry from Spain for the 21st Century, an anthology of poems from eleven contemporary Spanish poets, active from the 1960s through the present. Selected and translated by Forrest Gander, Panic Cure is notable for its impressive range of poetic voices.

  • Jan Brandt

    Sep 04| Lectures
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  • Joel Kyack

    Sep 09| Lectures
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    JOEL KYACK Lives and works in Los Angeles.

    ghebaly.com/artists/joel-kyack

  • A dynamic portrait of the life of computer prodigy Aaron Swartz who championed free speech and data sharing, this must-see documentary premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah and was the opening night film at the 2014 Hot Docs International Film Festival in Toronto, Canada. 

    We're excited the film’s director Brian Knappenberger will be our special guest speaker for the Q & A moderated by Movies that Matter series producers Judy Arthur and Perri Chasin after the screening. 

  • Koenraad Dedobbeleer lives and works in Brussels.

     

O-Tube

Curricular Connections

Ben Maltz Gallery Curricular Connections Tour


This information is designed to help Otis faculty members prepare their students for visits to the Ben Maltz Gallery. The reference material for each exhibition may vary but included are artists’ biographies and reviews of previous work; essay(s) by the curator(s); didactic material; checklist; and other background information that might be useful in the classroom. To schedule a tour of the exhibition for your group or class, you can do so online using the Tour Scheduling Form.
 

Guide for Current Exhibition

Food - Water - Life / Lucy + Jorge Orta  |  August 16 - December 6, 2014
 

Recent Curricular Guides

See menu at left for all past guides

Freeway Studies #2: This Side of the 405
April 13 – June 1, 2013

Binding Desire: Unfolding Artists Books
January 25 - March 30, 2014

 

 

Tips for class visits

Prior to coming to the gallery, review the materials and the information available on the Maltz Gallery’s exhibition page: images, press release, and often a short documentary style video tour.

If attending a scheduled tour with the curator or gallery staff member, take a stroll around the gallery for a first look to gather your impressions before the guided experience.

Ask students to prepare a question for the curator or tour guide prior to coming to the gallery to help create conversation, and to promote discussions.The gallery is for conversation not silence.

Please have students leave their bags in the gallery office while on the tour, and remind them that there is no food or drink allowed in the gallery.
 

Sample Assignments

A collection of helpful ideas for instructors who are designing gallery and exhibition related projects.
Sample Assignment 1

Tips for visiting an art gallery or museum on your own

Do research. See what information is available about the institution or specific exhibition prior to your visit.

Time it right. Check the gallery or museum hours before venturing out, and see if there are any public programs you might want to attend.

Keep an open mind. When you enter the gallery, take a look around the room at the work on your own first, before reading any of the didactic materials. Note your first impressions and then as you learn more about what you are looking at, reflect on how your impressions might change with more information. It’s important to understand the “who, what, where, why and how” of an artist’s intent and the context within which they are making work, but also important to allow for your own response to the work itself.

Ask questions. If you don’t understand what you are looking at or want more information, don’t hesitate to ask the people working at the gallery.

Stay in touch. If you like what you see at a gallery, sign up to be on the mailing list and go back again and again to learn more about their programming. Each venue has a different mission or focus.