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  • Rendering female models and celebrities on large-scale canvases and with quick, expressive brushstrokes, painter Katherine Bernhardt examines representations of beauty in mainstream media and fashion photography. She paints her subjects with severe, exaggerated features and emaciated limbs that sometimes morph into abstraction, recalling the works of Pablo Picasso. “Some people ask if I hate the models I paint,” she says. “I say no, I don't hate them.

  • UpCycle Day 2014!

    Sep 03| Special Event
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    Join us for the 3rd Annual UpCycle Day!

    Learn about the Resource Exchange

    Bring your excess supplies and materials to share and trade. 

    Stock up for the school year with Free supplies and materials. 

    Help divert our collective waste from ending up in landfills.

     

  • Forrest Gander

    Sep 03| Lectures
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    Otis Books/Seismicity Editions is pleased to publish Panic Cure: Poetry from Spain for the 21st Century, an anthology of poems from eleven contemporary Spanish poets, active from the 1960s through the present. Selected and translated by Forrest Gander, Panic Cure is notable for its impressive range of poetic voices.

  • Jan Brandt

    Sep 04| Lectures
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  • Joel Kyack

    Sep 09| Lectures
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    JOEL KYACK Lives and works in Los Angeles.

    ghebaly.com/artists/joel-kyack

  • A dynamic portrait of the life of computer prodigy Aaron Swartz who championed free speech and data sharing, this must-see documentary premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah and was the opening night film at the 2014 Hot Docs International Film Festival in Toronto, Canada. 

    We're excited the film’s director Brian Knappenberger will be our special guest speaker for the Q & A moderated by Movies that Matter series producers Judy Arthur and Perri Chasin after the screening. 

  • Koenraad Dedobbeleer lives and works in Brussels.

     

O-Tube

Wilfred Jackson

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Born in Chicago in 1906, Wilfred Jackson ('28) one of cartoon's greatest directors, worked in a formative period for the budding new medium. Working long hours through the heydays of early animation, Jackson is widely judged to have set the standard for subsequent cartoon directors. At Disney, he was integral to the creation of feature classics like Snow White, and was also a technical innovator in terms of merging sound to pictures.

“Jaxon,” as he was called by Walt Disney, attended Otis in 1925. Three years later, after “hanging around the Studios,” he volunteered to wash cels and assist animators at Disney until — in the same year that Mickey Mouse was born — he “found himself holding a paycheck,” later joking that "I'm the only guy [at Disney] who was never [actually] hired."

Jackson claims to have gotten into directing, too, by accident. After being asked by Walt to work out a sound-picture synchronization problem for the early sound cartoons, Jackson successfully devised a metronome to mark time that could be converted to a music track (a method still used in contemporary animation). The innovation, featured in Mickey Mouse's debut film "Steamboat Willie," revolutionized the entertainment medium, and Walt quickly promoted him from animator to director. Jackson garnered a reputation among Disney studio directors as “easily the most creative of the directors, but also the most ‘picky.’”

Among his other feats, Jackson contributed to the "Silly Symphony" shorts, and went on to direct 35 Academy Awards®-winning shorts: The Tortoise and The Hare, The Country Cousin, and The Old Mill. Probably the greatest example of his skill in developing action to music, however, was The Band Concert starring Mickey Mouse.

 Jaxon also applied his talent to other animated features, including Pinocchio, Dumbo, Saludos Amigos, Melody Time, Cinderella, Alice in Wonderland, Peter Pan, and Lady and the Tramp. He directed such memorable sequences as "The Night on Bald Mountain" in Fantasia. During the war years, he produced and directed government films for the U.S. Navy.

 In 1954, as Walt entered the new television medium, he asked Jaxon to produce and direct animated shows on the "Disneyland" series. His career at Disney spanned 35 years.