Otis College of Art and Design logo
Events
  • Rendering female models and celebrities on large-scale canvases and with quick, expressive brushstrokes, painter Katherine Bernhardt examines representations of beauty in mainstream media and fashion photography. She paints her subjects with severe, exaggerated features and emaciated limbs that sometimes morph into abstraction, recalling the works of Pablo Picasso. “Some people ask if I hate the models I paint,” she says. “I say no, I don't hate them.

  • UpCycle Day 2014!

    Sep 03| Special Event
    More

    Join us for the 3rd Annual UpCycle Day!

    Learn about the Resource Exchange

    Bring your excess supplies and materials to share and trade. 

    Stock up for the school year with Free supplies and materials. 

    Help divert our collective waste from ending up in landfills.

     

  • Forrest Gander

    Sep 03| Lectures
    More

    Otis Books/Seismicity Editions is pleased to publish Panic Cure: Poetry from Spain for the 21st Century, an anthology of poems from eleven contemporary Spanish poets, active from the 1960s through the present. Selected and translated by Forrest Gander, Panic Cure is notable for its impressive range of poetic voices.

  • Jan Brandt

    Sep 04| Lectures
    More
  • Joel Kyack

    Sep 09| Lectures
    More
    JOEL KYACK Lives and works in Los Angeles.

    ghebaly.com/artists/joel-kyack

  • A dynamic portrait of the life of computer prodigy Aaron Swartz who championed free speech and data sharing, this must-see documentary premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah and was the opening night film at the 2014 Hot Docs International Film Festival in Toronto, Canada. 

    We're excited the film’s director Brian Knappenberger will be our special guest speaker for the Q & A moderated by Movies that Matter series producers Judy Arthur and Perri Chasin after the screening. 

  • Koenraad Dedobbeleer lives and works in Brussels.

     

O-Tube

Berton Hasebe ‘05

Dec 16, 2013
Studying type design in The Hague
Spotlight Category: Alumni
I can’t say that winter in The Hague was the easiest thing for me. As a Hawaii expat, biking in zero-degree weather or being surrounded by grey skies most of the time was difficult. However the city itself is great, the sky eventually became blue more often, and weather-related concerns are a small factor compared to how much I enjoyed living, studying, and traveling in The Netherlands.
I graduated in 2005 with a BFA in Graphic Design, and in my junior and senior years, my interest in letterforms and type design grew to a point where I knew I’d eventually like to continue my studies. After working for about two years at Intersection Studio in Venice, I was accepted at the Type and Media program at The Royal Academy of Art in The Hague (KABK). There are several courses in the world that offer a type design curriculum, however I was particularly interested in KABK because of its great faculty and underlying curriculum. Although research of historical type models plays a part in the curriculum, teaching comes from a hands-on approach, where students quickly begin drawing letterforms through an understanding of basic structures. Through lessons in contrast, spacing and  proportion, we analyzed and drew letters based on an understanding of construction rather than direct historical references. The first part of the curriculum introduces type design through a broad range of topics such as calligraphy, stone carving, letterform sketching, typeface software/production methods, Python programming, and type history and theory. The second part is devoted to an execution of a final project, where the student focuses on a specific area of interest and designs a type family in this context. Intermittently throughout the year are class trips outside of the Netherlands, which included the Plantin Moretus museum in Antwerp and the Typo Berlin Conference. The ten students in the class came from Brazil, Canada, Italy, Switzerland and Vienna. This diversity plays a strong role in the class atmosphere, as each person’s background and perspective  contributes to a variety of coursework and design sensibilities. We became quite close, acting as a family with the same goals, rather than individuals competing against one another.