Events
  • Sitting in Sound

    Jul 15| Special Event
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    Image: Electronic Sound Bath
     

  • L: Nora Jane Slade, Kate Mouse Mickey Moss, 2014, Photo transfer and fabric paint on sweatshirt, cardboard and found objects. R: Marisa Takal, I Love My Sister, 2016, Oil on canvas, 65 x 50 inches.

    Opening Reception: I Wish I Was a Telephone: Nora Jane Slade and Marisa Takal

    Celebrate the opening of the two-person exhibition of work by Los Angeles-based artists Nora Jane Slade and Marisa Takal.

    Light snacks and refreshments.

    Exhibition on view July 15 - August 19, 2017.

  • Amelia Gray is the author of the short story collections AM/PM, Museum of the Weird, and Gutshot, as well as the novels Threats and, most recently, Isadora, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Tin House, and VICE. She is winner of the New York Public Library Young Lions Award, of FC2's Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. 

  • Image: BijaRi, On the rooftops of Santa Domingo-Savio neighborhood as part of the project Contando con Nosotros, 2011

    Opening Reception 3-5pm /  Curator and Artist led walk-thru of the exhibition, 3pm  /  Free

  • Talking to Action

    Sep 17| Exhibition
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    Image: Eduardo Molinari, Confluencia 2: Los Angeles River, 2016.

  • Luis J. Rodriguez was Los Angeles Poet Laureate from 2014-2016. The twenty-fifth edition of his first book, Poems Across the Pavement, won a 2015 Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement. He has written fourteen other books of poetry, children’s literature, fiction, and nonfiction, including the best-selling memoir Always Running: La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A. Rodriguez is also founding editor of Tia Chucha Press and co-founder of Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural & Bookstore in the San Fernando Valley. In 2016 Tia Chucha Press produced the largest anthology of L.A.-area poets, Coiled Serpent: Poets Arising from the Cultural Quakes & Shifts of Los Angeles. Rodriguez’s last memoir It Calls You Back: An Odyssey Through Love, Addiction, Revolutions, and Healing was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award. His latest poetry collection Borrowed Bones appeared in 2016 from Curbstone Books/Northwestern University Press.

  • Raised in Philadelphia, with roots in South Africa and Trinidad, Zinzi Clemmons’ writing has appeared in Zoetrope: All-Story, Transition, The Paris Review Daily, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships and support from the MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the Kimbilio Center for African American Fiction. She is co-founder and former Publisher of Apogee Journal, and a Contributing Editor to LitHub. She teaches literature and creative writing at the Colburn Conservatory and Occidental College. Her debut novel, What We Lose, as well as a second title, are forthcoming from Viking.

O-Tube

Rick Owens

Rick OwensRick Owens

 

The Paris-based American fashion designer Rick Owens (‘81) enjoys prominence in the international fashion world. His edgy, rough-hewn designs are sometimes described as “glunge” [glamour + grunge], and are worn by the likes of Courtney Love, Madonna and Helena Bonham Carter. Owens sells tens of millions of dollars’ worth of clothes each year, in 250+ high-end fashion stores around the world.

“Think of Rick Owens as the Ben Franklin of fashion,” writes Fashion Wire Daily Paris, “an American in Paris, a novel inventor, a rabid iconoclast, and an individualist blessed, or blemished, with the whiff of the sexually perverse. Admired at home in the United States, both were hailed in Paris — Franklin for his sharp wit and fertile mind, Owens for his unique vision and successful resuscitation of nearly moribund fur label Revillon. Though they arrived as celebrities in Paris, touted as influential players in the métier of choice, they both came from modest backgrounds — Benjamin from Massachusetts and Rick from Porterville, California.”

After Otis, Owens did knock-offs in L.A. before cutting patterns at a sportswear company owned by his now-wife Michele Lamy. He started selling his designs at Charles Gallay, and a few years later had negotiated a contract with Maxfield; by 1999, his line was a top seller at Barneys. In 2001, he signed a distribution deal with an Italian agency, and an Annie Leibovitz spread in Vogue further propelled his career. In 2002, he won the Council of Fashion Designers of America Perry Ellis Emerging Talent Award. Owens began his longstanding collaboration with stylist, Panos Yiapanis, and showed his first runway collection in New York in 2002. Since 2003, he has worked out of Paris where he doubly serves as creative director for the furrier Revillon. Some of his pieces were used to create the look for Emily Blunt’s character in the 2006 film The Devil Wears Prada. Owens was awarded a Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award, and his second store in New York's Tribeca district opened in 2008.

“With each new favorable notice,” writes The New Yorker, “Owens seems more determined to prove his independence from the fashion establishment. He doesn’t worry that his provocativeness will alienate customers or critics. [And though] he gives few interviews, doesn’t employ a publicist, and has never advertised his line, his diffidence seems to only enhance his cachet among fashion editors and insiders.”

“I have a simple long silhouette that I started out with,” says Owens in Image Gallery, “and still sell those same pieces the most since day one of my business. These are my foundations. But each season allows me to experiment with some new proportions to refresh my foundation.

“My look is about an appreciation of teenage angst without actually having the angst,” he has been known to say, and compares his style to a Brancusi sculpture: “(Just) a slab of metal on a hunk of wood, but it's about the right piece of metal, the right hunk of wood and the perfect gesture.”

 

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