Otis College of Art and Design logo
Events
  • Otis Books is pleased to publish Tim Erickson’s debut collection of poetry, Egopolis, a textual journey through destruction, resistance, city, and the Ego, from ancient times to the present day. Erickson’s work has appeared in the Chicago Review, Western Humanities Review, and the Salt Anthology of New Writing. He lives in Salt Lake City.

  • Otis Graduate Writing students will read from their works-in-progress.

  • Exquisite Beauty is the first retrospective and publication to document the eye-dazzling ceramics created by Ralph Bacerra (1938–2008), a Los Angeles–based artist known for his innovative approach to surface embellishment. Curated by Jo Lauria, the exhibition features more than ninety of the artist’s finest pieces—dramatic, highly decorated vessels and sculptures that have never before been the focus of a major exhibition or publication.

  • Opening Reception for Ralph Bacerra: Exquisite Beauty

  • David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota and currently teaches at USC. He is the author of the novels Little, The Hiawatha, The Translation of Dr. Apelles, named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, as well as a critical work, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual. In 2012, he published another nonfiction work, Rez Life.

  • Angela Flournoy’s first novel The Turner House was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. Her fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, and she has written for The New Republic, The Los Angeles Review of Books and elsewhere. Flournoy has taught at the University of Iowa and Trinity Washington University. She lives in Los Angeles.

  • Susan Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction, and her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her most recent novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. With David Remnick she co-edited the anthology Wonderful Town: New York Stories from The New Yorker. A recipient of fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, and in 2010, the inaugural winner of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award, Choi lives in Brooklyn.

O-Tube

Raymond Zibach

Raymond ZibachRaymond ZibachRaymond Zibach

 

Watch youtube video interview

Zibach (’90 Illustration) entered the world of Hollywood as a background artist, stylist, and key background painter before becoming head of a feature background paint department, then art director, and has recently crowned his achievements as the production designer for Kung Fu Panda, a DreamWorks hit, receiving the most Animated Film Society ‘Annie Award’ nominations (17) among animated films in 2008. The film is currently a shortlisted nominee for one of three coveted Academy Award feature animation spots, garnering critical raves such as Time magazine’s, that it "provides a master coursed in cunning visual art.”

"Raymond had great design ideas for the show in terms of the characters' shape language and the textural detail we wanted to achieve, “says visual effects supervisor Markus Manninen in Animation World magazine. "We spent a lot of time evaluating and deciding how to get that richness onscreen while making smart choices about what big complicated systems we needed to develop [in order to realize the final project]."

“We used tons of reference sources,” adds Zibach. “I was on the film for five years. We looked at Chinese art and architecture, even temple carvings. We immersed ourselves in the culture. […] Our original [concept] paintings of China were a big influence. They were done in watercolor and ink wash, but the more modern colors we used came naturally to me from working in animation. I was more influenced by people like Mary Blair and classic animation art directors who always pushed the color emotionally. Our backgrounds have an electricity to them when they're lit in CG.”

"I was definitely more influenced by traditional animation, but also by movies like Hero, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon or House of Flying Daggers. They're kung fu movies, but they're so heavily art-directed and beautiful, with a great emotional tie between color and what's happening onscreen.”

Zibach has constantly found ways to blend drawing and painting with cutting-edge CG techniques in order to create a fresh look and feel for each TV or film project that he works on, which includes Space Jam, Star Wars: Clone Wars, Alvin and the Chipmunks, Ren and Stimpy and Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas.

Thinking back on his Otis days, Zibach recalls: “Design, composition, color, traditional painting ability, the drive to complete assignments in creative ways and be your own worst critic, were all key to landing a job in animation. From that point on I found my own way.”