• Todd Gray

    Oct 25| Lectures

    Todd Gray was born in 1954 in Los Angeles. Gray received an MFA and a BFA from California Institute of the Arts and is currently a professor at California State University, Long Beach. He has shown performance work at REDCAT (Roy and Edna Disney CalArts Theater), Los Angeles (2010); California African American Museum, Los Angeles (2009); the Commons, New York University (2008); 18th Street Arts Center, Santa Monica (2008); New Renaissance Theater, Syracuse, NY (2007); and Academy of Media Arts, Cologne (2004).

  • Ruby Neri is a sculptor, painter, and former street artist from San Francisco and Los Angeles, California, known for her evocative portrayal of horses.

  • Otis in NYC
    October 27, 2016 
    6 - 8 pm 
    Franklin Parrasch Gallery
    53 East 64 Street
    New York, NY 10065

    Otis College President Bruce W. Ferguson is coming to NYC! 
    Please come say hello and visit with your fellow alumni and friends of Otis College of Art and Design.
    Drinks and hors d'oeuvres.


  • Lecture takes place at 356 S. Mission Rd., co-presented with Ben Maltz Gallery in conjunction with the exhibition Polly Apfelbaum: Face (Geometry) (Naked) Eyes.

    New York-based critic and independent curator Bob Nickas presents his musings on one hundred paintings, choosing one from each year from 1915-2015.

  • Bob Nickas

    Oct 31| Lectures

    Bob Nickas is a critic and independent curator based in New York, having organized more than ninety exhibitions since 1984.
    He was Curatorial Advisor at P.S.1/MoMA in New York between 2004-07, where his exhibitions include: 
    Lee Lozano: Drawn From Life; 
    William Gedney—Christopher Wool: Into the Night; 
    Stephen Shore: American Surfaces; 
    Wolfgang Tillmans: Freedom From The Known. 

  • Looking at the recent works of Sebastian Stumpf one finds an interplay between performance and the recording of performance, between the execution of a physical act and the documentation of it by means of a camera. [He] operates in two distinct realms: in the empty spaces of contemporary art institutions and in urban settings with their preexisting orders. […] An inconspicuous architectural detail suddenly becomes the catalyst for a physical exploit…. The art gallery becomes a space for action.

  • Passionate Voices Expressed in Sound Bearing Plastic: An Evening with Collector Richard Shelton


Hideo Date

Hideo DateHideo DateHideo Date


Hideo Date was born in Osaka, Japan, and emigrated to California in 1923. After graduating from high school, he enrolled at Otis but left after a year to pursue the study of traditional ‘nihonga’ brush painting in Japan. This style melded the strong use of line in Japanese painting with Western techniques of perspective and modeling.

Date returned to L.A. where, during the late 1920s and 1930s he says that he and his fellow artists “were influenced by Orient across the Pacific just as N.Y. was influenced by Europe across the Atlantic. He was part of the so-called "Independents," a group of L.A.-based artists who rejected modernism and described their work as “Linear-composition.”

Date and his colleagues fell under the influence Stanford MacDonald-Wright, who oversaw the Los Angeles Art Students League and was one of the originators of Synchronism, the “orchestration” of colors in paintings based on “major” and “minor” color scales —as well as the avant-garde art scene. Macdonald-Wright’s works impressed Date, who admitted: “I was flabbergasted, such colors I had never seen before.”

Date spent the 1930s creating art and exhibiting through groups such as the College Art Association, the Foundation of Western Art, the Los Angeles Oriental Artists Group, and the Los Angeles Art Association. Because he held onto nearly all of his work, he had to make his living from odd jobs, once working on a mural at Mary Pickford’s mansion. He also depended on the generosity of friends, the occasional commission, and private teaching.

Art exhibitor Hammond Sadler once described Date’s work as being “primarily interested in linear movement and color. Combining these elements in a manner never attempted by the older Japanese painters, he has scorned the strictly traditional for ‘Datean.’ Particular note of his work in watercolor must be made. The finish, developed by him, is unsurpassed in its jewel-like surface.”

The outbreak of World War II sent Date to Wyoming’s Heart Mountain concentration camp, where he taught art privately to other Japanese-American inmates. After the war, he went to New York and traveled extensively, including trips to Italy and France.

“Over his lifetime,” writes Japanese-American National Museum curator Karin Higa, “Date had preferred not to sell his artwork even when he had the chance.” But in 1999, Date finally decided to donate more than 190 works to the L.A.’s Japanese American National Museum.


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