Events
  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

    This week from 4:00 - 5:00 pm is Welcome to the Haunted Boulevard. Join DJ Platinum (Grace Potter) and DJ Batsy (Jessi Hita) for a journey of the folklores, urban legends, and paranormal encounters from different cultures. 

     

    Listen online at KLMU.

  • Creative Action and the Otis Community Radio class present weekly broadcasts each Monday.

     

  • Mexican artist Yoshua Okón’s videos blur the lines between documentary, reality, and fiction. He collaborates closely with his actors (often amateurs who are also the subjects of the work) to create sociological examinations that ask viewers to contemplate uncomfortable situations and circumstances.
  • Dana Johnson is the author of the short story collection In the Not Quite Dark. She is also the author of Break Any Woman Down, winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, and the novel Elsewhere, California.

  • Gallery 169 will be hosting the Otis College of Art and Design Communication Arts Graphic Design Junior Show, "5328," displaying a selection of work made over the five thousand twenty eight hours that make up the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Work will include collected posters, publications, and typographic projects.
  • Clay, Body is a solo exhibition from artist Sydney Aubert: Unapologetically fat, crass, and sexual, a ceramics artist who also works in video, and whatever other materials arouse her in the moment. Exhibition will be on view from Monday, April 24 - Friday, April 28 at the Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design. On view by appointment only, please contact the artist at sydney.aubert@gmail.com Reception: Thursday, April 27 | 6pm-9pm Bolsky Gallery, Otis College of Art and Design

  • Audrey Wollen is a feminist theorist and visual artist based in Los Angeles. Wollen uses social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, as platforms for her work on Sad Girl Theory, a theory which posits that internalized female sadness can be used as a radical and political action, separate from masculinized forms of protests such as anger and violence. She introduces this form of protest as an alternative to masculinized anger and violence.

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Dean Tavoularis

Dean TavoularisDean TavoularisDean Tavoularis

 

Identifying Dean Tavoularis (‘55, Fine Arts) as Francis Ford Coppola’s production designer does not fully encapsulate his design career in and beyond Hollywood. His rich collaboration with Coppola led to such classics as The Godfather films, Apocalypse Now, The Conversation, One From the Heart, Rumble Fish, The Outsiders, Tucker, and New York Stories.

According to Tavoularis, “when I was young, I attended art school, [but] there were no film schools to speak of then, though this was L.A. I went to movies and lost myself in them. Their settings registered but I was not aware of art direction in film and I never said to myself: “This is what I want to do.”

“Very often with Dean,” remembers Coppola, “even early on when I didn’t know if I agreed with him, I learned that his instincts were very good and that later on I would like very much his idea even if it wasn’t immediately something I liked."

Other directors with whom Dean collaborated on his more than 30 films and five Academy Award nominations include Arthur Penn (Bonnie and Clyde), Michelangelo Antonioni (Zabriske Point), Roman Polanski (The Ninth Gate), Wim Wenders (Hammet) and Warren Beatty (Bullworth).

“He attained a higher reality, that of poetry,” notes writer Jean-Paul Scarpitta. “Any form of spectacle is for him a visual feast, a challenge, and a source of inspiration. In his art, he doesn’t dwell on magic, visual deception, optical illusion, or unreality... His penetrating eyes allow him to watch and feel things deeply, which leads him to capture what others are not privy to see: the gimmicks, the artifices, the tricks, the element of life upon which the veil of illusion is cast. In his mind there is a clear parallel between painting and cinema, in that he considers one and the other as different yet compatible means to create an illusory world which only exists in a dimension of its own."

 

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