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  • Otis Fine Arts hosts a Visiting Artist lecture series featuring John Houck, a Los Angeles-based artist. Read more about him here.
    Contact: Soo Kim, skim@otis.edu
  • Jesse Benson (b. 1978) is an artist based in Los Angeles. Benson's complex practice is driven by the perversion of roles and representation that characterize his generational moment. In obsessively "skillful" objects like the Bureau Paintings, Catalog Page Paintings, Future Sculptures, and Repaintings, Benson constantly questions the authenticity of the document, the function of style, and the value of both art and artist. Benson is equally committed to a curatorial/organizational practice that openly overlaps and inspires his object production.

  • The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at OTIS College of Art and Design is pleased to announce a lecture by Nick SeierupPrincipal | Design Director of Perkins+Will, Los Angeles, on Thursday, December 3, 2015.


  • Marisa Silver is the author most recently of the New York Times bestselling novel Mary Coin. Her other books include the novels No Direction Home and The God of War (a finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize), as well as two story collections, Babe in Paradise and Alone with You. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker and been included in many anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Silver lives in Los Angeles.

  • Jesse Lerner is a filmmaker based in Los Angeles.  His short films Natives (1991, with Scott Sterling), T.S.H. (2004) and Magnavoz (2006) and the feature-length experimental documentaries Frontierland/Fronterilandia (1995, with Rubén Ortiz-Torres), Ruins (1999) The American Egypt (2001), Atomic Sublime (2010) and The Absent Stone (2013, with Sandra Rozental) have won numerous prizes at film festivals in the United States, Latin America and Japan.

  • Otis faculty member Dana Berman Duff will present a program of short 16mm and digital films in her "Catalogue" series.

  • Performing the Grid is an exhibition that brings together an intergenerational group of artists and cultural producers that utilize the grid as a performative strategy to examine, challenge and position philosophical, political, social, domestic, corporeal, and mythical perspectives. Rosalind Kraus famously wrote that the grid “functions to declare the modernity of modern art” in her 1979 essay, Grids.


Blaine Fontana

Blaine FontanaBlaine FontanaBlaine Fontana


Having grown up on an island in the Seattle area, BlaineFontana” Hogg (’02, Communication Arts) made his way through Otis and received top honors with the “Best in Show” award.

While still in school, he worked as an art director at a cutting edge design firm (Abound LLC.) and also at a fashion/lifestyle magazine (Metro.Pop); he has since worked as an Art Director for a young men’s apparel company (Drifter). In January of 2003 he opted for self-employment as a fine artist and designer. “I wanted to put my own voice and vision out there,” says Fontana, “so I left the company and starting working on my own projects. I haven’t looked back.”

Fontana’s work is featured in a monograph that samples his work from 2002-2006. Drawing on elements and experiences as diverse as Asian calligraphy, found objects, and the vibrant color palette of graffiti, Fontana integrates the urban and the natural worlds. His particular vision invokes religious myths, worldly folklore and contemporary social observations that result in work that harmoniously integrates the organic and inorganic, the physical and metaphysical, order and chaos.

Fontana’s freelance lifestyle affords him some extra time to commit to RTEA (Reaching To Embrace Arts), an L.A. organization that raises money to buy supplies and fund art programs for seven inner-city elementary schools. Fontana has worked as an art director/curator and web master. “I became aware of the tremendous under-funding of art programs in our public schools,” says Fontana. “RTEA is helping the next generation get the encouragement they need. Art opens a young person’s mind to the things that are beautiful in this world. Art programs help round out a person’s life experience. My life has been better because of art, and I want to share this opportunity with others.”